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Full text of "Annual report of the town of Chelmsford"

IN MEMORIUM 





ROGER BOYD 

Member of Board of Selectmen 1 953-1 956 

Housing Authority 1970-1976 

Tercentenary Committee 1955 

Died November 21, 1976 



ARNE OLSON 

Cemetery Commissioner 

Member-Cemetery Commission 1948-1976 

Died October 30, 1976 



Cover Design By 

Bonita A. Towle 

7 Albina Street 

East Chelmsford, Mass. 01824 



Honorable Mention: 

Edward F. Harris 
16 Gallup Drive 
Chelmsford, Mass. 01824 



ANNUAL REPORT 

of the 

Town of Chelmsford 




FOR THE YEAR ENDING DECEMBER 31, 



1976 



Printed By 
The Rene Press, Inc. 



GENERAL INFORMATION 

Incorporated: May, 1655 

Type of Government: Town Meeting 

Location: Eastern Massachusetts, bordered by Lowell and Tyngsborough on 

the North, Billerica on the East, Carlisle on the South, and West- 
ford on the West. It is 24 miles from Boston, 40 miles from 
Worcester, and 225 miles from New York City. 

County: Middlesex 

Land Area: 22.54 Square Miles 

Population, 1970: 31,032 

Density, 1970: 1 ,394 persons per square mile 

Assessed Valuation, 1976: $260,617,615 (Real Estate) 

$9,967,600 (Personal Property) 

Tax Rate: $41 .50 

United States Senators in Congress: Edward W. Brooke, Newton 

Edward M. Kennedy, Boston 
Representatives in Congress: 

5th Congressional District Paul T. Tsongas, Lowell 

State Senator: 

7th Middlesex District Ronald C. McKenzie, Burlington 

Representative in General Court: 

43rd Middlesex District Bruce N. Freeman, Chelmsford - Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 

45th Middlesex District Philip L. Shea, Lowell - Precincts 2 & 7 

47th Middlesex District Edward LeLacheur, Lowell - Precincts 4 & 11 

Accounting Department Monday thru Friday 8 

Assessors Office Monday thru Friday 8 

except Monday Evenings 7 

(except June, July & August) 

Building Inspector Monday thru Friday 8 

Thursday 5 

Board of Health Monday thru Friday 8 

Highway Department 

Office Monday thru Friday 8 

Garage Monday thru Friday 8 

Public Libraries 

Adams Library Monday thru Friday 10 

Saturdays 10 

MacKay Library Monday thru Friday 2 

Saturday 2 

School Superintendent Monday thru Friday 8 

Selectmen's Office Monday thru Friday 8 

Town Clerk Monday thru Friday 8 

Monday Evenings 7 

(except June, July & August) 

Tax Collector & Treasurer Monday thru Friday 8 

Monday Evenings 7 

(except June, July & August) 

Veterans Agent Monday thru Friday 8:30 a.m. • 5:00 p.m. 



30 a.m. 


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00 p.m. 


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00 a.m. 


-9:00 p. m 


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- 6:00 p. m 


30 p.m. 


- 9:00 p. m 


30 p.m. 


-6:00 p. m 


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-8:00 p. m 



MEETINGS 



Annual Election 
Annual Town Meeting 
Selectmen 
School Committee 
Planning Board 
Appeals Board 
Conservation Commission 
Board of Health 
Housing Authority 



First Saturday in April 

Last Monday in April 

Monday- 7:30 P.M. 

Tuesday -8:00 P.M. 

7:30P.M., 2nd & 4th Wed . every month 

7:30P.M., 4th Thurs . every month 

8:00 P.M., 1st & 3rd Tues. every month 

7:30 P.M., 2nd Tues. every month 

7:30 P.M., 1st Tues. every month 



12 Precincts 

McCarthy Jr. High School 

Town Hall 

High School 

Town Hall 

Town Hail 

Town Hall 

Town Hall 

1 Smith Street 



ELECTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Moderator 

Daniel J. Coughlin.Jr. 
(Term Expires-1978) 

Town Clerk 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
(Term Expires-1978) 



Board of Selectmen 



PaulC. Hart 
Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 
Philip L. Currier 
Arnold J. Lovering 
William R. Murphy 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 



Treasurer & Tax Collector 
Philip J. McCormack 
(Term Expires- -1978) 



Board of Assessors 



Ruth K. Delaney 
Janet Lombard 
Claude A. Harvey 
Richard L. Monahan 



Term expires 1977 

Term expires 1978 

Term expires 1979 

Retired 1976 



School Committee 

George A. Ripsom Term expired 1976 

Robert D. Hall Term expires 1977 

William J. Reynolds Term expires 1977 

Carol C. Cleven Term expires 1978 

Harry A. Foster Term expires 1978 

Myra Silver Term expires 1979 

Sinking Fund Commissioners 

FrancisJ. Goode Term expired 1976 

Kenton P. Wells Term expires 1977 

Lillian Stott Term expires 1977 

Eustace B. Fiske (Resigned) Term expires 1978 

Raymond L. Reynolds Term expires 1979 

Sewer Commissioners 

Joseph M. Gutwein Term expires 1977 

TheodoreJ. Rapallo Term expires 1978 

MatthewJ. Doyle Term expires 1979 

Trustees of Public Libraries 



James M. Harrington 
Jean R. Mansfield 
Audrey A. Carragher 
Elizabeth A. McCarthy 
Dr. Howard K. Moore 
James M. Geary 



Term expired 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Cemetery Commissioners 

Dr. Everett V. Olsen Term expires 1977 

Gerald L. Hardy Term expires 1977 

Arthur J. Colmer Term expires 1978 

Arne R. Olsen Deceased 

Chelmsford Housing Authority 



Robert L. Hughes 
Claude A. Harvey 
Ruth K. Delaney 
Richard L. Monahan 
Roger W. Boyd 



Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1980 
Term expires 1981 
Deceased 



Board of Health 



Paul J. Canniff 
Peter Dulchinos 
Paul F. McCarthy 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Nashoba Valley Technical 
Vocational School District 

James M. Harrington Term expires 1977 

Jay M. Knox Term expires 1977 

Stratos Dukakis Term expires 1978 

Louis E. Kelly Term expires 1979 

Park Commissioners 

Ralph E. House Term expired 1976 

J. Joan Schenk Term expires 1977 

Arthur L. Bennett Term expires 1978 

Bradford O. Emerson Term expires 1979 



Planning Board 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 
Eugene E. Gilet 
Stephen D. Wojcik 
Thomas E. Firth 
A. Robert Raab 
Henrick R. Johnson, Jr. 
CarolynJ. Fenn 
Ann McCarthy 



Term expired 1976 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1980 



William E. Spence 



Myles Hogan 



Constable 



Tree Warden 



Term expires 1977 



Term expires 1978 



Varney Playground Commissioners 
Elected at Town Meeting 

HenryJ. Tucker, Jr. Term expires 1977 

HarryJ. Ayotte Term expires 1978 

Robert C. McManimon Term expires 1979 



APPOINTED TOWN OFFICIALS 

Town Accountant 



Ernest F. Day 



Term expires 1977 



Board of Selectmen, Administrative Assistant 

Evelyn M. Haines Term expires 1977 

Town Counsel 

Clement McCarthy Resigned-12/31/76 

James M. Harrington Appointed-12/13/76 



Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 



Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 



Cemetery Superintendent 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1977 

Park Superintendent 

Donald P. Gray Term expires 1977 

Director of Public Health 

Thomas W. Morris Term expires 1977 

Board of Health Physician 

BenjaminJ. Blechman, M.D. Resigned 6/30/76 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. Appointed 7/1/76 



Superintendent of Streets 
Louis R. Rondeau Term expires 1977 

Dog Officer 

FrankJ. Wojtas Term expires 1977 

Cheryl L. Constatine (Assistant) Resigned 5/4/76 

Stacia Wojtas (Assistant) Appointed 7/26/76 

Special Constable 

Joseph d. Nyhan 

Inspector of Animals 

Dr. Martin A. Gruber Term expires 1977 

Building Inspector 

Peter J. McHugh, Jr. Term expires 1977 

Gas Inspector 

Neal C. Stanley Term expires 1977 

Plumbing Inspector Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 

William H. Shedd Richard M. Kelly 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 
Anthony C. Ferreira 

Town Aide & Council on Aging 
Kathleen Robinson 

Assistant Town Clerk Assistant Assessors 

Mildred C. Kershaw (Retired) Evelyn M. Philbrook 

Elizabeth L. Delaney Gail S. Minns 

Assistant Treasurer 

Florence M. Ramsay 

Planning Board Clerk Zoning Appeal Board Clerk 

Judith E. Carter Velma Munroe 

Veteran's Grave Officer 

George E. Baxendale Term expires 1977 

Wiring Inspector 

Harold M. Tucke, Jr. 



Alternates 

Marguerite Waldron Joseph Dappal 



Recreation Director 

Russell Kerr 



Town Planner 

Robert W. Flynn 



Purchasing Agent 

Christos A. Alexion 



Finance Committee 

Marvin Schenk Term expires 1978 

Richard McDermott Term expires 1978 

William Edge Term expires 1978 

Peter Curran Term expires 1978 

Richard Sullivan Term expires 1978 

Kathryn E. Hughes Term expires 1979 

James A. Decker Term expires 1979 

Donald McGillivray Resigned 

James Thompson Resigned 

Zoning Appeal Board 

Marshall Arkin Term expires 1977 

S. Robert Monaco Term expires 1978 

Robert Kydd Term expires 1978 

Carolyn Bennett Term expires 1980 

Charles Higgins Term expires 1981 



Gula Boyce 
Kathleen Robinson 
Edna Nelson 
Christina Ahern 
Clarence Dane 
Louise Bishop 



Daniel Burke 



Council on Aging 



William Clarke 

Lillian Gould 

Mary McAuliffe 

Sarah M. Dunigan 

William Marston 

Chadbourne Ward 



Joan Arcand (Resigned) 

Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 

Thomas Palmer, Jr. Paul C. Hart 

Edmund Polubinski Peter Dulchinos 

Thomas E. Firth, Jr. Robert R. Gagnon 

Robert C. McManimon Haworth Neild 

John J. Kenney 

Lowell Drug Treatment - Share 

Donald Butler Edward Fallon 

Marion Yonge 

Cable Television Advisory Committee 

Stan Norkunas Harold Witt 

Richard Arcand John Carson 

F.D. Cavallari J. Alan Moyer 

Robert McAdam Robert Brooks 

Chris Tournas School Dept. Rep. 

Susan Schleigh Adams Library Rep. 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Commission 



George A. Parkhurst 
John C. Alden 
Walter R. Hedlund 
J. Perry Richardson 
Charles Marderosian 



Richard Lahue 



Audrey Carragher 

Anna Normand 

MaryJ. Guaraldi 

Hedwig Zabierik 

Janet Lombard 



Youth Center Advisory Committee 

Everett Brown Judy Harrison 

Thomas Dougherty Wendell Luke 

Janet Greeno Dr. Michael Gilchrist 

Melvin Petersen George Weinert 

JoAnn Weisman Elizabeth Marshall 

William R. Murphy Robert Hall 

Jay Finnegan Brian Sullivan 

Norman Douglas 

Youth Center Coordinator 
Gary Wolcott 

Historical Commission 

Bertha Trubey Term expires 1977 

Audrey Carragher Term expires 1977 

George A. Parkhurst Term expires 1978 

Robert C. Spaulding Term expires 1978 

John P. Richardson Term expires 1978 

John C. Alden Term expires 1979 

Richard Lahue Term expires 1979 

Chelmsford Historic District Study Commission 

Harold Davis John Alden 

John Balco Charles Watt 

Jane Drury 



Chelmsford Historic District Commission 



J. Perry Richardson 
Robert P. LaPorte 
Richard Lahue 
Dr. Paul Canniff 
Stephen Wojcik 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 



Alternates 

Harold J. Davis Charles Watt, Sr. 

Clerk-Barbara Arnold 

Library Needs Committee 
Dr. Howard K. Moore Elizabeth A. McCarthy 

Grace W. Pettee Thomas A. St. Germain 

Fence Viewers 

Reginald Furness Esq. 
Richard D. Harper 



Highway Administrative Ass't 
Pearl Koulas 

Veteran's Agent 

Mary McAuliffe 



CETA-Coordinator 

Ralph House 



Director Veterans Services 
William R. Murphy 

Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 

Dr. Albert Willis Thomas A. Ennis 

Victor Fetro Kenneth A. Cooke 

JamesJ. Walker Peter J. Saulis 

John J. McNulty Melvin Dejager 

George F. Waite Herbert T. Knutson 

Alfred H. Coburn Gerard A. Vayo 

Personnel Board 

DavidJ. McLachlan Peter Vennard 

William J. Hardy (Term Exp.) Marion McCready 



Paul Murphy 

John Peters 

Robert Roche 



Recreation Commission 

Harry Ayotte 
Robert Charpentier 
William Dempster, Jr. 

Joan Murray 

Summer- -Director: Donald Babin 

Assistant: Evelyn Newman 



Home Rule Advisory Committee 

Richard F. Burtt John MacPhee 

Denis D. Valdinocci Carol Stark 

Gerald Silver Morton Farber 

Jean-Paul Gravell 



Tom Long 
Ted Magiera 
Paul Westwood 
Charles Hacking 
Lillian Cabana 
George Fournier 



Weighers of Merchandise 



FrancisJ. Sakalinski 

Joseph Bobola 

Peter F. McEnaney 

John Bomal 

Leo Gendron 

Ovila Sirois 



Police Station Addition Committee 

Robert E. Germann Paul V. LaHaise 

Bernard L. George Peter McHugh. Jr. 

JohnH. Kelly. Jr. 

Town Celebration Committee 

Walter R. Hedlund James K. Gifford 

Raymond Day Richard O. Lahue. Sr. 

Board of Registrars 

Edward H. Hilliard Term expires 1977 

Robert J. Noble Term expires 1978 

Michael J. Devine Term expires 1979 

Mary E. St.Hilaire-Ex-Officio 

Capital Planning & Budgeting Committee 

Edward G. Krasnecki IraS. Parks 

Arnaud Blackadar Thomas E. Firth 

Donald McGillivray A. Robert Raab (Alternate) 

Civil Defense Committee 

George R. Dixon William W. Edge 

Walter R. Hedlund Sgt. Walter Edwards 

Christos Alexion Joseph Staveley 

George J. Brown Melvin dejager 



Conservation Commission 



Robert E. Howe 
John McCormack 
Edward J. Duffy 
Donald House 
John Balco 
Charles Parlee 
David Merrill 



Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1977 
Term expires 1978 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 
Term expires 1979 



Alex Coluchi 



Community Teamwork 

Kathleen Robinson 

Committee to Up-Date Town History 

Charles E. Watt, Sr. Charlotte DeWolf 

Julia Fogg Frederick Burne 

Town Forest Committee 

Bruce S. Gullion (Resigned) Kenneth Goggin 

John Smith 

East Chelmsford Fire Station Building Committee 

Walter R. Hedlund Edward G. Quinn 

Edward Hoyt Frederick Reid 

George Dixon 

North Middlesex Area Commission 

Philip L. Currier Selectmen's Rep. 

JohnJ. Kenny Alternate 

U.N. Day Chairman 

Margaret Fudge 

Mosquito Control Committee 

Lawrence McAllister (Resigned) Michael Carr 

Martin Bovey Kenneth Greeno 

Bruce Gullion 



Environmental Advisory Council 
Steering Committee 
Dr. Ethel Kamien Gene Roberts 

Ina Greenblatt Donald Caless 

Diane Lewis MichaelJ. Potsaid 

Dorothy Stumpf Gerald F. Locker 



George W. Marinel 
Joan Dillon 
Nancy K. Fawcett 
Karen Flynn 
Grace Auger 



Special Police Officers 
For School Traffic Duty 



Halvar Peterson 

L. Diane Zebny 

George Johnson 

James Morris 

Helen Chafe 



Alternates 



Janet Connor 
Irene Corsetti 



Carol Souza 
Jean MacPhail 



Special Police Officers 
Dog Officer Garrison House 

Frank Wojtas William A. Comeau 

Industrial Development Financing Authority 

Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. Walter Dronzek 

Bradford Emerson Hendrick Johnson 

Gerald Wallace 

Labor Relations Advisory 

Murphy, Lamere & Murphy 

Police Matrons 



Mary Long 
Emily Peake 



Grace Auger 
Nora Clifford 



Custodians of Public Buildings 

Robert Sheridan Town Hall 

John P. Curran Police Station 

Alphonse Varoski Adams Library 

School Building Committee 

Robert M. Sexton, Jr. Paul Krenitsky 

Anthony S. DeProfio Harry F. McKeon, Jr. 

Richard C. Miller Carol C. Cleven 

James A. Sullivan Carol A. DeCarolis 

Louis Murray 

Comprehensive Permitting Committee 

William R. Murphy Chairman Pro-Tern 

Dr. Paul Canniff Bd. of Health Rep. 

Donald House Conservation Comm. Rep. 

Henrick Johnson, Jr. Peter J. McHugh, Jr. 

Town-Wide Cultural Committee 

Marie Geary Mary J. Guaraldi 

Maureen Geary Christos Simorellis 

Rod Morrison Thomas G. Elliot 

Glen Goodsoozian Richard L. Meaney 

Jeanne Glenfield Irene J. Meaney 

Memorial Day Committee for the year 1976 

Leo F. Gorman 

Timothy F. O'Connor Representative Post 366 

Stanley F. Morrison 

Harold F. Woodman Representatives Post 212 

Carl Reedy 

Elbridge W. Hawes 

Donald House Representatives Post 313 



Central Square Committee 

William R. Murphy Robert L. Kydd 

Dr. L. Rodger Currie Gill Sherman 

John M. Handley, Jr. Robert Flynn 

Florence Mulkern Stephen Wojcik 

Kennel Building Committee 

Carl Seidel Charles Feeney 

Frank Wojtas Peter Green 

Dr. Martin Gruber, DVM 

Water District Colsolidation Committee- 
Disbanded 6/21/76 

Thomas Monteodorisio Samuel I. Parks 

Ronald Pare James McKeown 

Jo Anne Kelch Michael Devine 

David McCarthy William Murphy 
George Abely 

Department of Public Works Study Committee 

Gerald Silver Joan Schenk 

George Auchy Richard Russell 

Barbara Langworthy HenryJ. McClean 

Philip L. Currier - Sel. Rep. 

Flood Prevention Study Committee 

Harold Costa James K. Rogers 

John E. McCormack 



Roger Welch 
Eustace Fiske 



Arnold J. Lovering 



Insurance Advisory Committee 



Walter Hedlund 
Ration Board 

Paul McMillan 



Henrick Johnson 
Peter Dow 



Charles Koulas 



Four-C's Committee 

Kathleen Robinson 

Finance Committee/ Board of Selectmen 
Communication-Sub-Committee 

Donald McGillivray Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

Richard Sullivan William R. Murphy 

Personnel Board/Sel./Fin. Comm. /School Comm. 
Personnel Sub-Committee 

Robert Hall Thomas A. Palmer, Jr. 

Marion McCready James Decker 




BOARD OF SELECTMEN 



At the Board's organizational meeting on April 6, 
1976, following the Annual Town Election, Paul C. Hart 
was elected as Chairman of the Board. Other Board 
members are: Philip L. Currier, Vice-Chairman; 
Thomas A. Palmer, Jr., Clerk; William R. Murphy and 
ArnoldJ. Lovering. 

Highlights of the year's activities are included in the 
following paragraphs: 

As the Licensing Authority, the Board held its usual 
hearings on the issuance of various licenses and also 
reviewed licenses which come under their jurisdiction. 

In accordance with Town Meeting action, the Town 
acquired the Emerson Property, 11 North Road, for 
municipal purposes. During the summer months the 
house was completely renovated to meet office needs 
and the outer buildings were demolished. The house 
is presently being occupied by the Youth Center, Council 
on Aging, Town Planner, Purchasing Agent and CETA 
Co-Ordinator. 

A Local Growth Policy Committee was appointed 
in accordance with Chapter 807 of the Acts of 1975. 
This Committee prepared a final report which was 
presented to the Board of Selectmen for implementation. 

After a meeting with officials of the Town and 
residents, the Board closed the Youth Center at the 
Quessy School. The Youth Center Offices have been 
relocated at the Emerson House and the Quessy School 
is being used for storage by the Chelmsford Theatrical 
Society. 



The Board met with School Officials and toured 
the North Town Hall facility. The Selectmen were 
satisfied that the building was being utilized very effec- 
tively, therefore, the Board granted the use of the 
building to the School Committee for a five-year period. 

The Board had received approval from HUD to 
renovate the School House on Mill Road as a Drop-In 
Center for the elderly. The application was approved 
for $44,000. 

The Flood Relief Board approved the contract for 
the Restoration of Crystal Lake. DeMatteo Construction 
Company commenced work in early Spring and the 
project was completed during the month of December. 

The boundaries between Chelmsford and Billerica 
were perambulated. 

The Board did not renew their contract with the 
City of Lowell for use of landfill facility but did, in 
fact, open the Swain Road Facility for the disposal 
of waste. The Board has prepared several articles for 
the 1977 Annual Town Meeting which are as follows: 
Implement Mandatory Recycling Program; Develop the 
Swain Road Facility in accordance with the Camp, 
Dresser and McKee Report; and appraise land for 
expansion of the landfill. 

In conjunction with the Sidewalk Program developed 
by the Selectmen, sidewalks were constructed on Groton 
Road and North Road. 

In view of the fact that the Grange Hall, located 



on Proctor Road, was turned back to the Town, the 
Selectmen accepted written proposals for the use of the 
facility. At the conclusion of the public hearings, the 
Board voted to lease the hall to the Girl Scouts. 

During the year, the Selectmen adopted the following 
policies: Hiring Policy; Mileage Reimbursement Policy; 
Policy regarding Voting Hours; and Policy regarding 
Meeting with Town Departments. 

Selectmen Murphy has been appointed to the Gover- 
nor's Local Government Advisory Committee and has 
been elected as President of the Massachusetts League 
of Cities and Towns. 



The Board has continued its active role in the 
Massachusetts Selectmen's Association, Middlesex Coun- 
ty Advisory Board, Merrimack Valley Selectmen's Asso- 
ciation and Massachusetts League of Cities and Towns. 

Due to the resignation of Clement McCarthy, the 
Board appointed James Harrington as Town Counsel. 
Mr. William Edge, Finance Committee member, was 
nominated by Town Employees and chosen by the Board 
of Selectmen as the Outstanding Municipal Employee. 

We wish to take this opportunity to thank all 
Departments, Committees, Commissions and Boards for 
their accomplishments during this past year. 



TOWN CLERK 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Town Clerk 
Elizabeth L. Delaney, Ass't. Town Clerk 



LICENSES AND VITAL RECORDS 



Sporting 
Licenses 

1560 



Dog 
Licenses 

2449 



Kennel 
Licenses 



11 



Marriage 
Intentions 

253 



Recorded 
Mortgages, Etc. 

459 



Births 
(Incomplete) 

307 



Marriages 
300 



Deaths 
232 



1976 JURORS DRAWN 



The following names were drawn 
from the 75-76 list. 



The following names were drawn 
from the 76-77 list. 



112 

8 

91 

37 

12 

21 

7 

14 

29 

39 

94 

67 

4 

99 

110 
65 
66 

113 



1/26/76 
1/26/76 
1/26/76 
2/23/76 
2/23/76 
2/23/76 
2/23/76 
3/22/76 
3/22/76 
3/22/76 
3/22/76 
4/20/76 
4/20/76 
4/20/76 
4/20/76 
7/12/76 
7/12/76 
7/12/76 



45 
65 
77 
94 
1 
20 
59 
77 
65 
94 
33 
18 
53 
82 
80 
78 
3 
4 
25 
67 
87 
79 
46 



8/23/76 

8/23/76 

8/23/76 

8/23/76 

9/20/76 

9/20/76 

9/20/76 

9/20/76 

9/20/76 

9/20/76 

10/18/76 

10/18/76 

10/18/76 

10/18/76 

10/4/76 

10/4/76 

11/22/76 

11/22/76 

11/22/76 

11/22/76 

11/22/76 

11/22/76 

12/6/76 



1976-1977 JURY LIST 

Name and Address Occupation 

1. CALVIN P. ALLEN, 6 Hornbeam Hill Road Laborer 

2. EVERETT L. ASHE, 24 Overlook Drive Sales 

3. PETER L. BARD, 180 Tyngsboro Road Elec. Technician 

4. MELVIN E. BEAN, 163 Old Westford Road Inspector 

5. GRACE BEERS, 105 Warren Avenue Clerk 

6. ENID BERNARDI, 8 Queen Street Support Technician 

7. MADELINE P. BRENDEL, 137 Mill Road Group Leader 

8. MARYLEES BROSTOWIN, lOJanet Road Engineer 

9. OLIVE BROWN, 25 Mission Road Courier Cit. Clerk 

10. EDWARD J. BUCKLEY, 28 Sprague Avenue Mechanic 

11. VICTOR CARIGNAN, 159 Tyngsboro Road Fork Lift Operator 

12. LELAND F. CARR, 1 Alamo Circle Contracting Officer 

13. WALTER K. CETARUK, 20 Singlefoot Road Elec. Engineer 

14. WALTER F. CHASE, 10 Lancaster Avenue Retired 

15. ARTHUR CLOUGH, 6 Pecos Circle Ind. Engineer 

16. JOHN P. CONANT, 5 Herbert Road Mech. Engineer 

17. MARILYN D. COWAN, 270 Littleton Road Office Worker 

18. MAURICE CRONIN, 4 Algonquin Road Carpenter 

19. ANNE J. CUNNINGHAM, 30 Robert Bigelow Street Assembler 

20. DAVID F. CUSHING, 15 Trotting Road Engineer 

21 . JOSEPH DAPPAL, 8 Topeka Road Gen. Manager 

22. IRENE DEWARE, 5 Gelding Road Secretary 

23. PAUL R. DRAGON, 117 Graniteville Road Accountant 

24. KENNETH P. DUMAIS, 11 Spaulding Road Receiver 

25. LUCY M. EVANS, 15 Porter Road Housewife 

26. WILLIAM E. FLYNN, 87 Pine Hill Road Designer 

27. WILLIAM J. FULTON, 144 High Street Retired 

28. GREGORY L. GARDNER, 10 Footpath Road Project Mgr. 
29\ RICHARD J. GAVIN, SR., 6 Monument Hill Road Job Analyst 

30. ROBERT A. GILINSON, 8 Fuller Road Elec. Engineer 

31. LOIS M. GOODICK, 225 Acton Road Housewife 

32. ROBERT A. GRAY, JR., 11 Horseshoe Road Engineer 
23. EMMA G. HANSEN, 9 Arbor Road Housewife 

34. OSWALD G. HAYES, JR., 18 Sprague Avenue Engineer 

35. FRANCES E. HILL, 14 Carriage Drive Housewife 

36. JAMES C. HUFFMAN, 35 Abbott Lane Mathmetician 

37. MARY K. HUBBARD, 25 Robin Hill Road Housewife 

38. MARY A. HURLBURT, 93 Richardson Road Housewife 

39. GORDON F. ISLEIB, 14 Sleigh Road Engineer 

40. PAUL J. K AM PAS, 11 Trotting Road Engineer 

41. CLAIRE M. KELLY, 61 High Street Housewife 

42. JOSEPHINE KOKOSKA, 30 Arbor Road Secretary 

43. JEAN KYDD, 71 Elm Street Housewife 

44. ARMAND LALIBERTE, 19 Chatham Road Air Traffic Control 

45. JANET M. LANGENFELD, 8 Coach Road Housewife 

46. MARIE B. LATOUCHE, 196 North Road Hair Stylist 

47. RUSSELL C. LA WSON, 70 Boston Road Cab Driver 

48. HAROLD A. LECCESE, 8 Howard Road Engineer 

49. JEAN C. LONG, 12 Berkshire Road Housewife 

50. JOHN T. LUEBBERS, JR., 17 Hitchinpost Road Salesman 
51.NEOMA FAY MACKEY, 6 Princess Avenue Assembler 

52. FRANCIS D. MALONEY, 12 Laredo Drive Field Engineer 

53. RUTH F. MARSHALL, 24 Sleigh Road Elec. Assembler 

54. SHARON V. MCGRATH, 140 Dalton Road Secretary 

55. JOANNE L. NICHOLSON, 13 Temi Road Claims Clerk 

56. WILLIAM H. PALMER, JR. , 300 Old Westford Road Sheet Metal Worker 

57. WILLIAM PEST ANA, 57 Manning Road Shipper 

58. VINCENZA PHELPS, 30 Worthen Street Banker 

59. AUSTIN J. RALLS, 64 Dunstable Road Business Manager 

60. LOUISE I. REMICK, 219 Westford Street Housewife 
61.JUTTA I. RICHARDS, 13 Ranch Road Housewife 

62. NORMAN H. RUSSELL, 216 Graniteville Road Sales Executive 

63. BETTY A. SCRIBNER, 14 Brentwood Road Housewife 

64. JAMES A. SEYBOLD, 8 Richardson Road Mechanic 

65. MURIEL C. SIDEL, 9 Horseshoe Road Clerk 



66. THOMAS E. SIMMONS, 17 Cove Street 

67. FRANK G. SNOOK, 172 Proctor Road 

68. WAYNE A. SOUSA, 8Jerridge Lane 

69. KAREN SWEENEY, 4 Lord Road 

70. SUSAN M. TRAINOR, 20 Stearns Street 

71. FAITH ANN TUCKE, 67 North Road 

72. DAVID B. ULLOM, 11 Sunset Avenue 

73. SHERWOOD WARREN, 12 Walnut Road 

74. EDWARD R. WHITWORTH, SR., 37 Harding Street 

75. RACHEL E. WINSHIP, 117 Westford Street 

76. BYRON ZAKOS, 231 Groton Road 

77. HENRY R. ZUKOWSKI, 123 Groton Road 

78. FRANCES B. WILKINSON, 328 Old Westford Road 

79. JAMES J. TANSEY, 6 Mout Pleasant 

80. DOLORES H. STROBL, 46 Hornbeam Hill Road 

81. ELIZABETH M. STANTON, 270 Littleton Road 

82. ANDREW F. SHEEHAN, 22 IB Pine Hill Road 

83. MARILYN L. PYNE, 10 Prancing Road 

84. SAMUEL L. OTTEY, 314 Old Westford Road 

85. KENNETH A. O'BRIEN, 7 Muriel Road 

86. WILLIAM O'HARA, 17 Baldwin Road 

87. MINGTZER M.T. MIU, 5 Chestnut Hill Road 

88. IRENE A. MCHUGH, 126 Pine Hill Road 

89. SUSAN L. MCCARTHY, 5 Mission Road 

90. RICHARD H. MCCALL, 15 Sleigh Road 

91. DEBORAH MARCAURELLE, 3 Maple Avenue 

92. CHARLES M. LEHAN, SR., 17 Parlee Road 



Engineer 

Supervisor 

Truck Driver 

Cashier 

Assembler 

Lab Technician 

Lowell Gas 

Coordinator 

Retired 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Machinist 

Cashier 

Janitor 

Housewife 

Secretary 

Electrician 

Housewife 

Retired 

CPA 

Salesman 

Engineer 

Housewife 

Clerk Typist 

Supervisor 

Housewife 

Service Foreman 



1975-1976 JURY LIST 



Name and Address 

1. FRED ADAMS, Sinai Circle 

2. RAMON ARRUDA, 9 Prairie Road 

3. ROBERT P. BELANGER, 83 Dunstable Road 

4. DOROTHY G. BORROWS, 62 Hornbeam Hill Road 

5. ROGER BURKE, 21 Dunstable Road 

6. FRANCES F. CAMPBELL, 55 Locke Road 

7. EDWARD D. CIAMPA, 26 Marinel Avenue 

8. ROLAND J. CONWAY, 30 Mcintosh Road 

9. DAVID J. CUNHA, 144 Littleton Road 

10. ALBERT J. ALLARD, 31 Overlook Drive 

11. JOHN J. AVILA, JR., 15 Gay Street 

12. MICHELLE BENNETT, 25 Cathy Road 

13. JAMES L. BROWN, 16 Essex Place 

14. ARTHUR I. BUTLER, 8 Lantern Lane 

15. ANTHONY P. CELLINI, 249 Graniteville Road 

16. NANCY P. CLARK, 54 Westford Street 

17. PAUL L. COSTANTINO, 23 Charlemont Court 

18. MARY E. CUSHING, 188 Mill Road 

19. FLORENCE M. ANDERSON, 7 Sierra Drive 

20. EDWARD BARCUS, 10 Chestnut Hill Road 

21. KENNETH W. BOCZAR, 1 1 Kiberd Drive 

22. JOSEPH W. BUCCERI, 2 Johnson Road 

23. MARY F. CAIN, 40 Graniteville Road 

24. LEON A. CHASE, 1 Main Street 

25. CAROL A. COLBOURNE, 31 Algonquin Road 

26. CHERYL L. DAPPAL, 8 Topeka Road 

27. ANTHONY J. DECAROLIS, 17 Overlook Road 

28. JOHN P. DIROCCO, 17 Marose Avenue 

29. RICHARD T. DRONSEIKO, 19 Hitchinpost Road 

30. HARRIETTE FARRINGTON, 34 Dalton Road 

31. JAMES J. FOX, JR., 142 Boston Road 

32. JOSEPH A. GEOFFREY, 106 Wightman Street 

33. JOSEPH J. GRAVELLE, 34 North Road 

34. DAVID F. HADLEY, 64 School Street 

10 



Occupation 

Tester 

Sales Manager 

Dir. of Food Service 

Manager 

Driver 

Housewife 

Testman 

Dir. of Advertising 

Owner-Manager 

VP and Sales Manager 

Truck Driver 

Cashier 

Group Leader 

Design Analyst 

Foreman 

Housewife 

Senior Accountant 

Receptionist 

Housewife/ P/T Piano Teacher 

Silk Screener 

Truck Maint. Supt. 

Engineer 

Homemaker 

Retired 

Unemployed 

Teacher 

VP-Sales Manager 

Repair Technician 

Design Engineer 

Bookkeeper 

Secretary 

Machine Technician 

Self-Employed-Gen. Contr. 

Service Technician 



35. ROBERT L. HARMON, JR., 53 Warren Avenue 

36. CATHERINE HILL, 14 Carriage Drive 

37. EDWARD I. DEIBERT, 134 Boston Road 

38. ROBERT E. DONALDSON, JR., 29 Warren Avenue 

39. CECELIA FERREIRA, 39 Marshall Street 

40. ANN M. FRENCH, 9 Jensen Avenue 

41. BARRY M. GILMAN, 21 Thomas Drive 

42. MARION H. GREENWOOD, 2 Juniper Street 

43. RICHARD A. HALLION, 22 Sleigh Road 

44. CATHERINE HEHIR, 25 Church Street 

45. CHARLES P. HOEFLER, 21 Charlemont Court 

46. PATRICIA A. DEYOUNG, 36 Miland Avenue 

47. JAMES T. DOSSETT, 14 Lantern Lane 

48. ROBERT R. EGAN, 221 Mill Road 

49. ANNE M. FLEMING, 1 Manor Circle 

50. ALLAN T. GALPIN, JR. , 70 Davis Road 

51. BARBARA D. GOGGIN, 38Janet Road 

52. J. W. GROVE, 7 Buckman Drive 

53. MARTIN J. HANNON, 20 Carriage Drive 

54. SAMUEL T. HERRICK, JR., 21 Marina Road 

55. EDWARD P. HOPEY, 70 Hunt Road 

56. HUGH F. KEANEY, 81 Dalton Road 

57. EUGENE S. KILLMON, JR., 6 Comanche Circle 

58. JOHN S. LACHUT, 14 Sherman Street 

59. JULIA ELIZABETH LEWIS, 12 Longview Drive 

60. ALBERT A. MARCHAND, 14 Manahan Street 

61. JOHN E. MCM ANUS, 11 Hitchinpost Road 

62. RUTH D. MERRILL, 75 North Road 

63. EVA A. MORIN, 143 High Street 

64. ROBERT E. OSBORNE, 20 Russell Road 

65. THOMAS J. PELLETIER, 10 Pilgrim Road 

66. MARION R. KELLEY, 24 Bridge Street 

67. ERNEST G. KISLEY, 19 Chestnut Hill Road 

68. JOSEPH T. LAMOUREUX, 5 Edgewood Street 

69. BEVERLY A. MACKEY, 4 Wiede Street 

70. JOSEPH T. MAYHAN, SR., 9 Green Valley Drive 

71. WILLIAM J. MCCARTHY, 1 80 Tyngsboro Road 

72. CHARLES E. MILLER, 21 Johnathan Lane 

73. BRENDEN G. MUNGO VAN, 61 Church Street 

74. REGINALD J. PALASKI, 11 Dennison Road 

75. JOHN T. PIERCE, 50 Hall Road 

76. EDWIN KENNERLY, 4 Woodhead Road 

77. J. C. KRAMER, 27 Sandra Drive 

78. HARRY M. LEONARD, JR., 9 Brush Hill Road 

79. JOHN MAGNUSON, 289 Action Road 

80. JOHN T. MCCARTHY, 4 Starlight Avenue 

81. MARTY K. MCLAIN, 310 Old Westford Road 

82. CAROLYN A. MOODY, 23 Billerica Road 

83. STELLA OCZKOWSKI, 274 Billerica Road 

84. DUNCAN PATRIQUIN, 10 Clarissa Road 

85. EVERETT A. PORTEOUS, 270 Littleton Road 

86. ROBERT D. PRESCOTT, 43 Highland Avenue 

87. DORIS L. REIMER, 13 Abbott Lane 

88. JOHN H. ROSS, 10 Kiberd Drive 

89. FRED W. SCHRIM, 5 Sandra Drive 

90. OLIVER C. SHELDON, 43 Clarissa Road 

91. LORRAINE M. STAUFFER, 17 Pleasant Street 

92. MURIEL SWEET, 47 Dunstable Road 

93. THOMAS J. TEVLIN, 10 Bartlett Street 

94. LUISE WADSWORTH, 279 Mill Road 

95. JOANNE L. WILSON, 8 Amherst Street 

96. ELIZABETH K. PUROL, 18 Samuel Road 

97. FELIX ROBERTS, 14 Bishop Street 

98. BEATRICE F. RUSSELL, 216 Graniteville Road 

99. PAUL C. SCRIBNER, 14 Brentwood Road 

100. EILEEN M. SIMPSON, 57 Main Street 

101. PAUL A. STUART, 39 Berkeley Drive 

102. JANICE T. SWIDERSKI, 39 Abbott Lane 

103. NORMAN TREMBLAY, 60 Gay Street 

104. DOROTHY WERLICH, 39 Old Stage Road 

11 



Material Control 

Cook 

Cabinet Maker 

Truck Driver 

Lab. Technician 

At Home 

Dir. of Mat'l. Services 

Housewife 

Truck Driver 

Assembler 

Bank Manager 

Housewife 

Manufacturing Mgr. 

Education Consultant 

Student 

Senior Staff Analyst 

Legal Secretary 

Product Manager 

Technician 

Sales Executive 

Computer Mfg. 

Social Worker 

Project Manager 

Unemployed 

Student 

Custodian 

Personnel Director 

At Home 

Unemployed 

Meat Cutter 

Student 

Manager 

Supervisor 

Machine Operator 

Housewife 

Manager 

Engineer 

Consultant 

Mfg. Test Technician 

Store Owner 

Tech. Staff 

Project Engineer 

Manager 

Accountant 

Unemployed 

Student 

Supervisor 

Horticulturist 

Warehouseman 

Laborer 

Clerk 

Housewife 

Student 

Machinist 

Engineer 

At Home 

Bank Teller 

Manager 

Administrator 

Nurses Aid 

Housewife 

Foreman 

At Home 

Salesman 

Animal Breeder 

Project Manager 

Housewife 

Driver/Counterman 

Sales Representative 



105. MARCY R. YURICK, 270 Littleton Road 

106. MAURICE RACETTE, 250 Dunstable Road 

107. ELIZABETH L. ROESSLER, 3 Raymond Road 

108. JAMES W. SAULNIER, JR., 1 7 Regina Drive 

109. THEODORE G. SHAMP, 35 Longmeadow Road 

110. WAYNE R. ST. ONGE, 58 High Street 

111. RICHARD J. SULLIVAN, 29 Sleigh Road 

112. FRANKLIN W. TAYLOR, 20 Sharon Avenue 

113. JOAN TURK, 9 Chelmsford Street 

114. DAVID R. WILCOX, 205 Graniteville Road 

115. BARBARA J. ENGEL, 305 Acton Road 



Keypunch Supervisor 

Clerk 

Assistant Director 

Contractor/Gen. Mgr. 

Senior Engineer 

Letter Carrier 

Self-employed/Sales 

Manager 

Accountant 
Social Worker 



TOWN WARRANT FOR 
PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 2, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . 
Precinct 2. 
Precinct 3. 

Precinct 4. 
Precinct 5. 
Precinct 6. 
Precinct 7 . 
Precinct 8. 

Precinct 9. 
Precinct 10. 
Precinct 1 1 . 
Precinct 12. 



McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 

School Band Room 

East Chelmsford School 

Byam School Cafetorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

North Elementary School Auditorium 

Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

South Row School Auditorium 

South Row School Auditorium 

Westlands School Cafeteria 

Fire House - Old Westford Road 



On Tuesday, the 2nd day of March, 1976, being the 
first Tuesday in said month, at Eight o'clock a.m. for the 
following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for the 
Election of Candidates of Political Parties for the follow- 
ing offices: 

Presidential Preference 

District Members of State Committee (one man and 

one woman for each Political Party for the Fifth 

Middlesex Senatorial District) 

Thirty-five (35) Members of the Democratic Town 

Committee 

Thirty-five (35) Members of the Republican Town 

Committee 

Ten (10) Members of the American Town Committee 



The polls will be open from 8:00 AM to 8:00 PM. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this warrant with 
your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 23rd day of February, 
A.D., 1976. 

S/ArnoldJ. Lovering, Chairman 
S/Paul C. Hart, Vice Chairman 
S/William R. Murphy, Clerk 
S/ThomasA. Palmer, Jr. 
S/Philip L. Currier 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



February 24, 1976 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room, North Ele- 
mentary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford 
School, Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, North Elementary School Auditorium, Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, 
South Row School Auditorium, South Row School Audi- 
torium, Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire House - 
Old Westford Road seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/William E. Spence 
Posted 2/24/76 



12 



DEMOCRATIC PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 
March 2, 1976 

Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 

12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 Total 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



Robert L. Kelleher 





1 











1 


1 


1 





1 


2 





7 


George C. Wallace 


31 


29 


40 


36 


33 


35 


42 


21 


32 


60 


30 


47 


436 


Ellen McCormack 


4 


8 


20 





10 


15 


3 


9 


4 


13 


8 


13 


107 


Terry Sanford 









































Lloyd Bentsen 









































Fred R. Harris 


21 


19 


18 


12 


25 


12 


16 


12 


13 


24 


18 


22 


212 


MiltonJ. Shapp 


11 


2 


21 


4 


17 


13 


5 


4 


15 


16 


7 


23 


138 


Birch Bayh 


33 


7 


26 


9 


14 


20 


11 


13 


13 


50 


13 


20 


229 


Jimmy Carter 


36 


37 


69 


32 


55 


51 


46 


29 


33 


64 


44 


68 


564 


R. Sargent Shriver 


19 


14 


24 


5 


12 


25 


21 


13 


12 


23 


18 


8 


194 


Henry M. Jackson 


68 


80 


115 


62 


81 


75 


60 


66 


83 


94 


60 


84 


928 


Morris K. Udall 


83 


43 


82 


35 


70 


75 


45 


43 


55 


115 


71 


94 


811 


No Preference 


3 


1 


6 


2 


6 


3 


1 


2 


2 


4 


5 


1 


36 


Write-in 


13 


4 


9 


4 


11 


5 


9 


7 


3 


10 


10 


8 


93 


Blanks 


3 





1 


7 


2 


1 


4 


2 





2 


7 


2 


31 


TOTAL 


325 


245 


431 


208 


336 


331 


264 


222 


265 


476 


293 


390 


3,786 


STATE COMMITTEE 




























John F. Cogan, Jr. 


204 


154 


257 


137 


225 


222 


181 


138 


170 


288 


205 


215 


2,396 


Write-in 


1 




















2 




3 


Blanks 


120 


91 


174 


71 


111 


109 


83 


84 


95 


188 


86 


175 


1,387 


TOTAL 


325 


245 


431 


208 


336 


331 


264 


222 


265 


476 


293 


390 


3,786 


STATE COMMITTEE 




























Jean E. Rubenstein 


189 


142 


237 


123 


211 


210 


154 


133 


156 


292 


187 


214 


2,248 


Write-in 


1 




1 




1 












3 




6 


Blanks 


135 


103 


193 


85 


124 


121 


110 


89 


109 


184 


103 


176 


1,532 


TOTAL 


325 


245 


431 


208 


336 


331 


264 


222 


265 


476 


293 


390 


3,786 



TOWN COMMITTEE 



Dorothy G. Borrows 


148 


110 


192 


107 


174 


154 


122 


108 


132 


221 


154 


186 


1,808 


Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 


163 


127 


211 


104 


176 


176 


134 


126 


148 


236 


154 


210 


1,965 


Charles E. Cummings 


140 


108 


185 


105 


165 


150 


120 


95 


126 


214 


142 


183 


1,733 


Joseph J. Dappal 


141 


100 


179 


98 


178 


131 


121 


102 


138 


250 


139 


187 


1,764 


Ruth K. Delaney 


167 


124 


202 


119 


183 


185 


134 


124 


147 


241 


183 


218 


2,027 


Michael J. Devine 


143 


102 


178 


120 


168 


135 


125 


98 


130 


218 


139 


178 


1,734 


William J. Donovan, Jr. 


156 


113 


196 


102 


174 


163 


130 


109 


142 


222 


162 


189 


1,858 


Matthew J. Doyle, Jr. 


149 


105 


195 


106 


175 


152 


126 


107 


134 


232 


142 


186 


1,809 


Stratos G. Dukakis 


153 


111 


205 


100 


181 


144 


127 


108 


140 


237 


139 


211 


1,856 


Margaret C. Fox 


151 


109 


185 


106 


173 


141 


122 


101 


144 


230 


140 


190 


1,792 


James M. Geary, Jr. 


180 


125 


220 


112 


189 


167 


137 


130 


160 


257 


159 


217 


2,053 


James M. Harrington 


164 


116 


204 


103 


176 


168 


130 


103 


138 


226 


146 


188 


1,862 


Louise M. Harrington 


159 


109 


191 


108 


174 


146 


126 


102 


138 


233 


155 


191 


1,832 


Daniel J. Hart 


177 


123 


224 


125 


181 


181 


147 


125 


155 


251 


167 


206 


2,062 


Janet T. Laughlin 


152 


105 


188 


102 


172 


151 


128 


105 


134 


226 


150 


187 


1,800 


Peter M. Laughlin 


147 


105 


183 


104 


166 


142 


123 


96 


130 


216 


144 


182 


1,738 


Mary H. Long 


165 


118 


190 


107 


177 


174 


139 


105 


133 


226 


187 


196 


1,917 


Thomas F. Markham, Jr. 


162 


129 


233 


121 


182 


172 


141 


135 


151 


242 


154 


221 


2,043 


Mary E. McCarthy 


158 


109 


191 


105 


180 


155 


130 


106 


129 


223 


159 


196 


1,841 


Paul F. McCarthy 


158 


109 


206 


101 


172 


148 


130 


110 


131 


230 


139 


196 


1,830 


Marion E. McCready 


146 


101 


188 


102 


176 


159 


127 


103 


130 


223 


144 


188 


1,787 


Dolores E. McGuire 


145 


99 


187 


99 


168 


134 


127 


101 


129 


217 


139 


188 


1,733 


Mary B. McNally 


143 


106 


187 


103 


168 


161 


129 


97 


130 


214 


150 


192 


1,780 


Carl A. Olsson 


150 


109 


184 


101 


168 


149 


126 


101 


133 


214 


156 


189 


1,780 


Judith A. Olsson 


149 


103 


182 


97 


172 


147 


126 


102 


133 


217 


156 


192 


1.776 


Emily A. Peake 


148 


105 


181 


111 


166 


131 


124 


96 


138 


213 


152 


181 


1,746 


Mary E. St.Hilaire 


181 


133 


245 


118 


210 


203 


157 


139 


160 


269 


186 


236 


2,237 


Robert E. Sayers 


147 


109 


190 


97 


167 


141 


120 


107 


132 


210 


133 


183 


1.736 



13 



RichardJ. Sullivan 
Robert A. Sheridan 
Thomas A. Wall 
EdmundJ. Welch 
M. Angelique White 
Mary E. White 
Stephen D. Wojcik 
Write-In 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



151 
145 
145 
146 
138 
153 
172 
1 



106 
111 
108 
121 
104 
107 
114 



196 
201 

184 
177 
185 
187 
209 



101 
101 
98 
105 
100 
107 
111 



181 
172 
183 
166 
166 
166 
185 
1 



138 
136 
137 
155 
138 
175 
161 



124 

125 
114 
129 
118 
124 
141 



99 

100 

98 

95 

91 

107 

118 



133 

137 
131 
127 
126 
132 
147 



222 
215 
215 
210 
211 
222 
244 



140 

144 
136 
148 
142 
152 
149 



185 
193 
183 

176 
181 
191 
195 



1.776 
1.780 
1.732 
1.755 
1.700 
1.823 
1.946 



5,982 4,682 8,244 3,574 5,629 6,185 4,737 4,021 4,477 8,713 4.974 6,879 68.097 
11,375 8,575 15,085 7,280 11,76011,5859,240 7,770 9,275 16,660 10.255 13.650132.510 



REPUBLICAN PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 2, 1976 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Total 
12 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 



Ronald W. Reagan 
Gerald R. Ford 
No Preference 
Write-in 
Blanks 



51 

106 

4 

5 





26 

40 

5 

2 

2 



76 

86 

6 

1 

3 



21 

23 

1 

3 

3 



53 
106 

2 
16 





48 

91 

2 

1 

2 



33 

64 

1 

2 

3 



42 

70 

3 

2 

1 



30 

41 

3 

4 





57 

85 

3 

2 

1 



27 

86 

2 

3 

2 



66 

54 

3 

2 





530 

852 

35 

43 

17 



TOTAL 



166 



75 172 51 177 144 103 111 



78 148 120 125 1,477 



STATE COMMITTEE 

Lawrence Braverman 523210941 3917 56 

Peter Dulchinos 85 44 104 21 76 67 40 64 33 65 49 72 720 

William H. Levison 01 14 26222 10 630 48 

David M. McLachlan 46 21 32 19 64 42 42 35 27 51 43 24 446 

Blanks 30 7 19 7 21 24 15 16 5 17 24 22 207 



TOTAL 



166 



75 172 51 177 144 103 118 78 148 120 125 1,477 



STATE COMMITTEE 

Clara F. Tubby 59 23 59 15 48 44 43 33 24 34 46 31 459 

Paula K. Lewellen 64 36 72 30 93 64 40 54 37 76 50 59 675 

Blanks 43 16 41 6 34 36 20 31 15 38 24 34 338 

Write-in • 2 2 15 



TOTAL 

TOWN COMMITTEE 
Peter Dulchinos 
Robert F. Wood 
Eleanor R. Wood 
William V.York 
Bruce N. Freeman 
John F. Ketcham 
Marguerite Waldron 
Gerard A. Vayo 
Russell W. Miller 
DavidJ. McLachlan 
Jean P. McLachlan 
Deborah S. Hinchliffe 
Myra Silver 
Judith G. Adams 
Phillip A. Adams 
JohnJ. Balco 
Susan C. Balco 
David F. MacKenzie 
Verton W. Lenfest 



166 



75 172 



51 



177 144 103 118 78 148 120 125 1,477 



04 


50 


118 


35 


125 


93 


63 


79 


46 


98 


79 


87 


977 


88 


39 


91 


28 


102 


77 


54 


74 


40 


80 


82 


65 


820 


89 


38 


88 


29 


99 


80 


52 


71 


39 


80 


81 


61 


807 


85 


33 


85 


29 


99 


77 


51 


75 


38 


78 


74 


62 


786 


32 


52 


134 


42 


144 


119 


84 


100 


60 


115 


93 


93 


1,168 


90 


37 


83 


29 


99 


76 


48 


73 


37 


77 


75 


62 


786 


88 


35 


96 


28 


106 


82 


51 


75 


41 


82 


69 


72 


825 


95 


42 


87 


27 


106 


83 


60 


73 


45 


77 


75 


76 


846 


87 


41 


84 


29 


99 


86 


54 


74 


37 


75 


72 


67 


805 


95 


42 


91 


31 


110 


88 


55 


75 


51 


90 


74 


66 


868 


87 


38 


88 


30 


105 


80 


52 


72 


49 


85 


69 


66 


821 


87 


37 


81 


28 


98 


84 


52 


70 


40 


78 


72 


66 


793 


90 


38 


97 


31 


113 


77 


52 


76 


48 


84 


75 


72 


853 


86 


37 


86 


30 


105 


75 


54 


73 


40 


84 


74 


72 


816 


88 


38 


85 


28 


101 


75 


53 


73 


39 


81 


70 


74 


805 


91 


38 


95 


29 


109 


79 


50 


75 


46 


89 


72 


70 


843 


89 


34 


91 


29 


109 


82 


51 


73 


46 


90 


70 


69 


833 


97 


43 


96 


31 


114 


90 


57 


78 


52 


90 


79 


67 


894 


84 


34 


84 


28 


94 


72 


56 


68 


38 


75 


70 


59 


762 



14 



Ivor K. Clements 


88 


37 


84 


28 


99 


76 


50 


67 


51 


75 


70 


60 


785 


Frances F. Campbell 


88 


40 


87 


31 


99 


77 


55 


77 


39 


79 


71 


65 


808 


Rita M. Gamache 


88 


36 


92 


29 


103 


76 


53 


76 


44 


77 


73 


62 


809 


Salvatore L. Lipomi 


84 


35 


84 


28 


98 


71 


51 


69 


41 


76 


69 


62 


768 


Halvar P. Peterson 


88 


42 


92 


30 


105 


85 


69 


72 


41 


75 


75 


66 


840 


RobertJ. Noble 


87 


41 


92 


29 


99 


75 


49 


71 


44 


79 


73 


65 


804 


John P. Fawcett 


88 


35 


86 


29 


95 


74 


50 


71 


39 


74 


70 


62 


773 


Nancy P. Clark 


95 


39 


88 


31 


101 


82 


52 


82 


41 


77 


81 


66 


835 


Marian D. Currier 


93 


38 


92 


35 


104 


95 


53 


83 


47 


91 


81 


67 


879 


James A. Paisley 


84 


35 


84 


28 


102 


74 


49 


67 


42 


74 


71 


62 


772 


Philip L. Currier 


101 


42 


95 


32 


113 


99 


55 


89 


40 


100 


81 


76 


923 


Byron D. Roseman 


98 


41 


102 


30 


104 


83 


55 


77 


44 


84 


73 


77 


868 


Charles S. Koulas 


94 


37 


88 


29 


101 


81 


54 


72 


38 


75 


75 


69 


813 


Roger W. Boyd 


97 


41 


92 


36 


106 


96 


57 


77 


38 


84 


77 


65 


866 


Claude A. Harvey 


104 


40 


91 


38 


119 


98 


61 


90 


51 


99 


83 


74 


948 


Raymond T. Osborn 


107 


40 


90 


34 


110 


95 


59 


79 


40 


79 


81 


70 


884 


Blanks 


2,574 


1,260 


2,821 


717 


2,500 


2,1281,684 


1,484 


1,218 


2,274 


1,571 


1,981 


22,215 



TOTAL 



5,810 2,625 6,020 1,785 6,195 5,0403,605 4,130 2,730 5,180 4,200 4,375 51,695 



AMERICAN PARTY PRESIDENTIAL PRIMARY 

March 2, 1976 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 
12 3 4 5 6 7 



PRESIDENTIAL PREFERENCE 

Write-in 

No Preference 

Blanks 



1 


1 











1 





























































































Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Total 
8 9 10 11 12 



TOTAL 



STATE COMMITTEE 

William R. Nimee 11000 00000 

Blanks 00000 1 00000 



TOTAL 



STATE COMMITTEE 
Blanks 



TOTAL 



TOWN COMMITTEE 



Blanks 



1 


1 











1 




















3 


1 


1 











1 




















3 

















1 




















1 





































































































































































































































































































. 






























































10 











9 




















29 



TOTAL 



10 



10 



10 



30 



15 



WARRANT FOR THE 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

April 5, 1976, and May 3, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you are 
hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters of 
said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School - All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 

Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gumnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precint 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House - Old Westford Road 

On Monday, the fifth day of April, 1976, being the 
first Monday is said month, at 8:00 A.M., for the follow- 
ing purposes: 

To bring in their votes for the following officers: 

Two Selectmen for three years 

One Assessor for three years 

One member of Board of Health for three years 

One member of School Committee for three years 

One member of Nashoba Valley Technical High School 

District Committee for three years 
One Cemetery Commissioner for three years 
One member of Housing Authority for five years 
One Public Library Trustee for two years to fill vacancy 
Two Public Library Trustees for three years 
One Park Commissioner for three years 
Two Planning Board members for three years 
One Sewer Commissioner for three years 
One Sinking Fund Commissioner for three years 

And to vote upon the following question: 

QUESTION: 

Shall the Town of Chelmsford participate in the 
METCO program? The result of such vote shall not be 
deemed to be binding upon the selectmen or other 
officers of said town. 

Yes 
No 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M.; 
and to meet in the Chelmsford High School Gymnasium 
on Monday, the third day of May, 1976, at 7:30 P.M. 
o'clock in the evening, then and there to act upon the 
following articles, viz: 



ARTICLE 1. To hear reports of Town Officers and 
Committees; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled 'Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law" by deleting therefrom the following posi- 
tions: under Administrative and Clerical; Personnel 
Board's Recording Clerk and Planning Board Clerk; 
under Conservation and Cemetery; Cemetery Foreman, 
Cemetery Laborer, Cemetery Equipment Operator; 
under Custodial; Custodian (Center Hall), Custodian 
(Library), Custodian (Police Department); under Re- 
creation; Administrative Assistant to the Recreation 
Commission; and inserting the following positions: under 
Conservation and Cemetery; Park Equipment Operator; 
under Custodial; Custodian; under Recreation; Clerk 
and by inserting under Youth Center; Coordinator, Chief 
Supervisor, Supervisor IV, Supervisor III, Supervisor II, 
Supervisor I, Clerk; and further vote to amend the first 
sentence of Section 14 of said By-Laws by deleting there- 
from the words, "On January 1st" and substituting there- 
for the words, "On July 1st"; and to further amend the 
Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-Laws: 

15. Legal Holidays 

The Legal Holidays to which full-time permanent and 
part-time permanent employees are entitled with pay 
are: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King's Birthday, 
Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, Memorial Day, 
Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veter- 
ans' Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas. 

Part-time permanent employees are entitled to Holiday 
pay if the Holiday falls on their regularly scheduled work- 
day and for a number of hours equal to the ratio of their 
scheduled work week to the full-time permanent em- 
ployee's work week times the full-time permanent em- 
ployee's work day. (Example: 



Scheduled Hours 
Full-time Hours 



20 hrs per wk 
37 ]/2 hrs per wk 



x 7 V2 hrs 



equals 4 hours Holiday pay.) 

19. Hours of work shall be as follows: 

A. Full-time permanent employees 

I. For Town Accountant and those occupying posi- 
tions designated as "clerical" - 37 •/£ hours per 
week. 

II. For those occupying positions designated "Me- 
chanical and Construction Occupation", Conser- 
vation and Cemeteries, Custodian and Health - 
40 hours per week. 

B. Part-time permanent employees 

I . Any employee who is scheduled to work 20 hours 
per week or more. 

C. (previously III, Deleted) 

D. (Previously IV, no change) 



16 



E. (Previously V, no change); 
or act in relation thereto. 



H. RECREATION 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2A. T o see if the Town will vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage and 
Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of pay negotiated by 
the Town with certain labor organizations, pursuant to 
General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 178 G through 
178N: 



Recommended 

Fiscal 

Julyl. 1976 



A. ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 

1. Veteran's Agent S 8,500.00 p 

2. Clerk, Senior 7.431.00 p 

3. Clerk 5.923.00 p 

4. Town Accountant 14.000.00 p 

5. Assistant Treasurer 1.00 p 

6. Town Counsel 500.00 p 

7. Selectmen's Administrative 11,000.00 p 
Asst. 

8. Board of Registrar's Clerk 850.00 p. a. 

9. Board of Registrars. (3 members) 360.00 ea. 
10. Clerk, Part-time 3.20 hr. 
ll.TownAide 7.560.00p.a. 

B. CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 



Current 
1975 1976 



1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Superintendent of Insect 
and Pest Control 

3. Landscaper - Park 

4. Laborer - Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 

6. Skilled Forest Workman 

7. Equipment Operator - Park 
8 Park Superintendent 

C. CUSTODIAL 



$11,466.00 p.a. 

1.00 p. a. 

3.92 hr. 
3.58 hr. 
2.21 hr. 

2.93 hr. 
4.23 hr. 

11,466.00 p.a. 



1 . Custodian 
D LIBRARY 

1 . Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aides 

E. HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1. Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 

3. Administrative Assistant 

The remaining classifications are subject 

F. TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 



513.456.00 p.a. 
9.500.00 p.a. 
8,005.00 p.a. 

3.32 hr. 

2.84 hr. 

3.20 hr. 

2.21 hr. 



$18,000.00 p.a. $ 

5.80 hr. 
1.00 p.a. 

o collective bargaining. 



$22,700.00 p.a. 
18.728.00 p.a. 



The remaining classificationa are subject to collective bargaining, 
G. TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 



1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 



S22.700.00p.a. 
18.728.00 p.a. 



ining classificationa are subject to collective bargaining. 



Clerk 
Direct 



of Summe 



Swimming Director 
Swimming Instructor 
Playground Director 
Playground Supcrviso 
Playground Instructoi 
Sports Instructor 



I. YOUTH CENTER 

1. Coordinator 

2. Chief Supervisor 

3. Supervisor IV 

4. Supervisor III 

5. Supervisor II 

6. Supervisor I 

7. Clerk 

J. MISCELLANEOUS 



Animal Inspector 
Building Inspector 
Gas Inspector 
Electric Inspector 

5. Sealer of Weights & Me 

6. Dog Officer 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 
Clock Winder 



Program 
Ml.N 
S70.00v 
r 70.00v 
70.00v 
O.OOv 



1. 
MAX 
S90.00wk. 

90.00wk. 

90.00wk. 

90.00wk. 

90.00wk. 

90.00wk. 



3.20 hi 

10.00 p. 

MIX. 



S10.334.00p.a 
3.73 hr. 
2.88 hr. 
2.88 hr. 
2.88 hr. 
2.88 hr. 
3.20 hr. 



S 1.000.00 p.a. 

15.000.00 p.a. 

4.00 visit 

4.00 visit 

2.000.00 p.a. 

6,500.00 p.a. 

5.200.00 p.a. 

100.00 p.a. 



* The rates set forth for the above departments are the 
1975-1976 rates and as negotiations are continuing these rales 
amended at the Town Meeting; or act in relation thereto. 



Personnel Board 



ARTICLE 2B. To see if the Town will vote to rescind 



Paragraph 16 C (Sick Leave) from the Personnel Wage 
and Salary Administration By-Law; or act in relation 
thereto. 

School Committee 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate such sums of money as may be required to 
defray town charges for the fiscal period from July 1 , 
1976, to June 30, 1977; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Town Treasurer, with the approval of the Selectmen, 
to borrow money from time to time in anticipation of the 
revenue of the financial year beginning July 1, 1976; in 
accordance with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 
44, Section 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, paya- 
ble within one year, and to renew any note or notes as 
may be given for a period of less than one year in accord 
ance with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to request the 
Department of Corporations and Taxation, Division of 
Accounts of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts to 
make an audit of all accounts in all departments in the 
Town of Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Treasurer 



17 



ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate a certain sum of money with which to meet 
bills for previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Seletmen 

ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the filing of a Petition in the General Court under the 
provisions of Section 8 of Article 89 or the Amendments 
to the Constitution for an act: Enabling the Town to pay 
the sum of $31,714.69 to Leo R. Dumont & Sons, Inc. 
and the sum of $817.90 toJ.M. Richards Company, Inc., 
and the sum of $1,168.50 to Maxwell Supply Company. 
Said bills having been incurred by the Chelmsford School 
Building Committee in connection with the completion 
of the New Chelmsford High School on Graniteville 
Road. Said work having been satisfactorily performed 
and completed between September and November, 
1975. Said work being the completion of certain work 
left incomplete by the General Contractor for the New 
Chelmsford High School at the time his contract was 
terminated. 

Chelmsford School Building Committee 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate, or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$413,185.84, or some other sum of money to pay the 
Treasurer of Middlesex County Retirement System, the 
said amount being the Town's share of the pension, ex- 
pense, and military service funds; or act in relation there- 



ARTICLE 13 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of equipment for the 
Highway Department, such purchase to be made under 
the supervision of the Board of Selectmen, and to author- 
ize the Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment pre- 
sently being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase one Dump Truck for the Highway De- 
partment and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one dump truck presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(b) To purchase one Truck Chassis for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one truck chassis presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(c) To purchase one Front End Loader for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one front end loader presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(d) To purchase one Pickup Truck for the Highway De- 
partment and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one pickup truck presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 

(e) To purchase one sidewalk snowplow for the Highway 
Department.; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$250,000.00, or some other sum of money, to be used 
as a Reserve Fund at the discretion of the Finance Com- 
mittee, as provided in General Laws, Chapter 40, Section 
6; or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to participate and file an appli- 
cation for funds under the Department of Housing and 
Urban Development Act of 1974; or act in relation there- 
to. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 14. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



ARTICLE 11. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of a 12 passenger Van 
and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale the 1974 
Van presently being used by the Council on Aging; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 12. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase and/or construction of 
a Salt Storage shed for the Highway Department, said 
shed to be located on Town owned property; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of purchasing six (6) new 
1976 - four door sedans to be used by the Police Depart- 
ment, said purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; and to authorize the Select- 
men to transfer by a good and sufficient bill of sale, title 
to one (1) 1973, one (1) 1974 and four (4) 1975 cruisers 
now being used by the Police Department; or act in re- 
lation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 15. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the 
purpose of providing mutual aid programs for police 
departments; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 16. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to construct a complete outdoor lighting 
system at the Chelmsford High School Athletic Field 
located on Graniteville Road; or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Recreation Commission 

ARTICLE 17. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$9,000.00 for the specific purpose of purchasing lighting 
fixtures to be erected on the site of the Southwell Soft- 
ball Field in North Chelmsford; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



18 



ARTICLE 18 . To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$5,000.00 from the Perpetual Care Interest Account to 
the General Labor Account; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 19. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$5,000.00 from the Perpetual Care Interest Account to 
the Beautification Account; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 20 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purchase of an air compressor for 
the Cemetery Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 21 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,352.00 to purchase two (2) tents for the Cemetery 
Department; or act in relation thereto. 

Cemetery Commission 

ARTICLE 22. To see if the Town will vote to designate 
the following roads as scenic roads under the provisions 
of Chapter 40, Section 15C to preserve the historical 
and natural character and physical appearance of such 
roads; 

High Street from Acton Road to Locust Street; 
Parker Road from Concord Road to Acton Road; 
Robin Hill Road in its entirety; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historical Commission 

ARTICLE 23. To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the Appeal Procedure set forth in General Laws, Chap- 
ter 40C, Section 12, specifying the Northern Middlesex 
Area Commission as the agency to review the determina- 
tions of the Chelmsford Historic District Commission; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historic District Commission 

ARTICLE 24. To see if the Town will vote to amend 



ARTICLE 25. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



the Chelmsford Historic District By-Law, Adopted under 
Article 34 of the 1975 Annual Town Meeting, by adding 
thereto the following: 

"Section 7. Any applicant for a certificate of appro- 
priateness, a certificate of non-applicability, or a certi- 
ficate of hardship, aggrieved by a determination of the 
Chelmsford Historic District Commission may, within 
twenty days after the filing of the notice of such deter- 
mination with the Town Clerk, file a written request 
with the Northern Middlesex Area Commission for a 
review by a person or persons of competence and ex- 
perience in such matters, designated by the Northern 
Middlesex Area Commission. The review and finding of 
such person or persons shall be governed by Section 12 of 
Chapter 40C of the General Laws of the Commonwealth 
of Massachusetts."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Chelmsford Historic District Commission 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to retain a consulting engineering firm to 
develop operational landfill plans, and to implement 
such plan (engineering site, work, and operating ex- 
penses); or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Health 



ARTICLE 26 . To see if the Town will vote to withdraw 
from the Central Massachusetts Mosquito Control Dis- 
trict; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Health 



ARTICLE 27 . To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$1,800.00 to be used to join or buy into the Merrimack 
Valley Home Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of ob- 
taining services for the care of the Town's older Amer- 
icans; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 27A. To see if the Town will vote to raise 



and appropriate or transfer from available funds a cer- 
tain sum of money to obtain the necessary surveys and 
plans for the acceptance of Ideal Avenue Extension; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 28. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
the following mentioned streets, as laid out by the Board 
of Selectmen, and shown by their reports and plans duly 
filed in the Office of the Town Clerk, and to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the purpose of reconstructing the 
following mentioned streets: 

Cranberry Lane 

Higate Road 

Livery Road Extension 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such re- 
quirements have been met; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 29 . to see if the Town will vote to adopt the 
following By-Law: 

"Copies of the Finance Committee Report, including 
the Warrant for each Annual Town Meeting shall be 
mailed or otherwise delivered by the Finance Committee 
to each residence of one or more registered voters of 
record no later than two weeks prior to the meeting."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 30. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the By-Law relating to Chelmsford Conservation Com- 
mission Reservations by adding Section 12 as follows: 

12. No person or persons, including but not limited 
to individuals, associations, partnerships, corporations, 

19 



trusts or public or quasi-public bodies, shall dump any 
material, trash, refuse, rubbish, garbage, or debris, in- 
cluding without limiting the generality of the foregoing, 
lumber, bricks, asphalt, plaster, wire, lath, paper, card- 
board, pipe, tires, ashes, refrigerators, motor vehicles, 
or parts of the foregoing without permission by vote of 
the Commission. 

Any violator of this section, who shall fail to remove any 
of the foregoing items so dumped, after being notified 
by the Conservation Commission or its duly authorized 
agent to remove same, shall be subject to a fine of not 
more than $50.00. Each day any or all of said items 
shall remain, after issuance of such notification to the 
violator, shall be a separate offense.; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 31. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money in order to purchase for conservation and 
recreational purposes approximately 32.5 acres of land 
on the southwest corner of Crystal Lake in North Chelms- 
ford. 

By vote of this article the Town authorizes the Conser- 
vation Commission to enter into contractural agreement 
with agencies of the Federal Government and the Office 
of Environmental Affairs of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts; or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Comission 



ARTICLE 32. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$10,000 in accordance with Massachusetts General Laws 
Chapter 132 A and Chapter 40, as amended, to purchase 
a certain parcel of land containing 20.47 acres, more 
or less, located in Chelmsford off the Lowell Turnpike 
for conservation purposes, said parcel being recorded 
in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds at Book 
2099, Page 687; and to authorize the Conservation Com- 
mission to enter into a contractural self-help agreement 
with the Massachusetts Department of Natural Re- 
sources; or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 



ARTICLE 33. To see if the Town will vote to petition 
the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the enactment of a special act entitled, 
"Procedure for Conducting Town Referendum", said act 
being as follows: 

Upon approval of a majority of those voting at a Town 
Meeting of Chelmsford, a question may be placed on the 
next ballot for Town Elections as a binding referendum; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 34. To see if the Town will vote to adopt a 
By-Law to establish criteria for conflicts of interest of 
Town Officers, employees, and appointed members of 
Town Committees; said By-Law to read as follows: 

All Town Officers and employees shall perform the duties 
and responsibilities of their office in a manner fully con- 



sistent with the code of ethics and conflict of interest 

requirements established by General Law under Chapter 

268A, Conduct of Public Employees. 

No Town Officer shall serve on any Town agency which 

directly affects his financial interests. 

No Town Officer may exercise his vote on any Town 

agency, if said vote would directly affect the income of 

a) that Town Officer, b) any member of the officer's 

family, or c) a business associate of that Town Officer.; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 

ARTICLE 35. To see if the Town will vote to form a 



single, town-wide water district for the Town of Chelms- 
ford; or act in relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

ARTICLE 36. In the event of an affirmative vote on 
the foregoing article, to see if the Town will vote to peti- 
tion the General Court of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts to enact special legislation establishing said 
water district; or act in relation thereto. 

Water District Consolidation Committee 

ARTICLE 37. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 



appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$100,000 for aerial mapping of the entire town; or act 
in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 38. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$2,000.00 to have the property lines and topographical 
surveys at the East and Quessy Schools for recording pur- 
poses; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 39. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money for the construction of sidewalks in accord- 
ance with plans and specifications prepared by the 
Middlesex County Engineers at the following locations: 

North Road from McCarthy Junior High to Dalton Road; 
Groton Road from Vinal Square to entrance of North 
School; 
Graniteville Road; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 40. To see if the Town will vote to approve 
the following By-Law: 

"The Board of Selectmen shall from time to time review 
and establish mileage compensation for Town employees 
under their jurisdiction".; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 41. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 

20 



appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to purchase a 1976 tractor with attach- 
ments and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one 
Rogers Litter Lift; or act in relation thereto. 

Park Commissioners 

ARTICLE 42. To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following By-Law: 

"The use of School grounds is prohibited for the following 
activities except when posted* otherwise: 

(a) Horseback riding 

*(b) Motor cycles and mini bikes 

*(c) Snow mobiles 

(d) Camping 

(e) Automobile related activities 

(f) Golfing 

(g) Model airplane activities 

*By-Law -- Such activities are automatically prohibited 
unless signs granting approval are posted on the 
grounds."; 

or act in relation thereto. 

Vandalism Committee and Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 43. To see if the Town will vote to amend 



Section One - Permit of the STREETS and SIDEWALKS 
By-Law of the Town by adding immediately after the 
words, "Board of Selectmen", the phrase "or its desig- 
nee"; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 44 . To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the Pond Street Closing By-Law by adding thereto the 
following section immediately after Section One: 

"1A. There shall be no parking on either side of Pond 
Street from June 15 to September 15 yearly."; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 45. To see if the Town will vote to accept 
Section 6C (Removal of ice and snow from private ways; 
conditions) and Section 6G (Private ways; temporary 
resurfacing; conditions.) of Chapter 40 of the Massa- 
chusetts General Laws; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 46. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds a certain 
sum of money to publish an update of the Town's history; 
or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 47 . To see if the Town will vote to rescind 
the present Town By-Law pertaining to Annual Town 
Meetings and Elections and substitute the following 
therefor: 

Annual Town Meeting (Election) 
The Annual Election shall be held on the first Saturday 



of April and the Annual Town Meeting shall be held 
on the first Monday which occurs eight (8) days there- 
after; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 47A. In the event of a negative vote on Arti- 
cle 47, to see if the Town will vote to rescind the present 
Town By-Law pertaining to Annual Town Meetings and 
Elections and substituting the following therefor: 

Annual Town Meeting (Election) 
The Annual Election shall be held on the first Monday 
of April and the Town Meeting shall be held on the 
second Monday of April; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 48. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Sinking Fund a certain sum of money to reim- 
burse the Town for expenses incurred for damage at the 
MacKay Library, Cemetery Department and Town Hall; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 49. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the unexpended balances of .the following completed 
school construction accounts to the construction account 
of the new 1972 High School: 



Old High School 
Old High School 
South Row School 
Westlands School 



$ 20.13 

6,293.91 

25,588.15 

20,863.82 

$52,863.82 



Purpose: To use available funds in order to decrease 
the amount of borrowing to complete the 1972 High 
School; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 50. To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following: 

Be it resolved that the Board of Selectmen undertake 
through a charter petition drive or a special act of the 
Legislature to be approved by the Town Meeting to se- 
cure full-time professional management for the Town; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 51 . To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following: 

Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford asks its re- 
presentatives in the Great and General Court to support 
and/or file fiscal responsibility legislation which would 
require a two-thirds vote of both houses or a local 
acceptance option on any legislation which, due to the 
lack of State funding, passes the cost down to the local 
government.; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



21 



ARTICLE 52, To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following: 

The Board of Selectmen will present on a yearly basis 
to the Annual Town Meeting a five-year Capital Im- 
provement Plan for acceptance so that the voters may 
be aware of the projected capital expenses and may pro- 
vide direction to the elected official. ; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 53. To see if the Town will vote to adopt 
the following: 

To allow the Highway Department to enter upon private 
property for the maintenance of streams.; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 54 . To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Mr. and Mrs. 
Maurice Camire all right, title and interest, if any, held 
by the Town in the following two parcels of land, for 
consideration to be determined: 

Parcel I. Lot 14, Block 23, Assessors' Map 67, con- 
sisting of 3300 square feet of land more or less and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Seventh Avenue, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from Isabella 
N. Hazlett by instrument recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1674, Page 
162. 

Parcel II. Lot 12, Block 23, Assessors' Map 67, consisting 
of 3300 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Seventh Avenue, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from James 
W. Hazlett by instrument recorded at said Registry in 
Book 1674, Page 163. 

For title reference see Treasurer's deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford, dated June 10, 1975, and recorded in said 
Registry at Book 2153, Page 300.; 

or act in relation thereto. 



Parcel II. Lot 10D, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, con- 
sisting of 3662 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Shore Drive, which 
was taken for non-payment of taxes from Frank Austin 
Riexinger by instrument recorded at said Registry in 
Book 1396, Page 171. Also see Land Court Notice of 
Disposal in Tax Lien Case recorded in Book 1741, Page 
565. 

Parcel III. Lot 18, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, con- 
sisting of 6750 square feet of land, more or less, and 
the buildings thereon, if any, located on Dover Street, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from Thomas 
F. Reilly by instrument recorded at said Registry in Book 
1362, Page 374. Also see Final Decree in Tax Lien Case 
and Notice of Disposal in Tax Lien Case, both issued by 
the Land Court and recorded in said Deeds at Book 
1456, Page 240.; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 56. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Kevin Ferreira all 
right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in the 
following two parcels of land, for consideration to be 
determined: 

Parcel I. Lot 39, Block 34, Assessors' Map 114, con- 
sisting of 2500 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Lexington Street, 
which was conveyed by Karlene G. MacKissock to the 
Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by quitclaim 
deed, dated November 2, 1961, and recorded at the 
Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1537, 
Page 493, in accordance with a vote under Article 48 
at the Annual Town Meeting of the Town of Chelms- 
ford on March 13, 1961. 

Parcel II. Lot 40, Block 34, Assessors' Map 114, con- 
sisting of 2500 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Lexington Street, 
which was conveyed by Raymond T. Osborn to the In- 
habitants of the Town of Chelmsford by quitclaim deed, 
dated November 21, 1961, and recorded at said Registry 
in Book 1540, Page 41, in accordance with a vote under 
Article 48 at the Annual Town Meeting of the Town 
of Chelmsford on March 13, 1961.; 



Board of Selectmen 



or act in relation thereto. 



ARTICLE 55. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to convey to Michael Jamgochian 
all right, title and interest, if any, held by the Town in 
the following three parcels of land, for consideration to 
be determined: 

Parcel I. Lot 15, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, consisting 
of 5,000 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Dover Street, which 
was taken for non-payment of taxes from David E. 
England and Gladys N. England by instrument recorded 
at the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
1620, Page 91. 

For title reference see Treasurer's deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford, dated June 10, 1975, and recorded in said 
Registry at Book 2153, Page 300. 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 57. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
the sum of $26,315.00 from free cash to the 1972 High 
School Account; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 58. To see if the Town will vote to instruct 



the Board of Assessors to issue the sum of $900,000.00 
or some lesser sum from free cash in the treasury for 
the reduction of the tax rate for the current fiscal period; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Finance Committee 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant with 



22 



your doings thereon at the time and place of said 
meeting. 

Given under our hands this 22nd day of March, A.D., 
1976. 

S/ArnoldJ. Lovering, Chairman 
S/Paul C. Hart, Vice Chairman 
S/William R. Murphy, Clerk 
S/ThomasA. Palmer, Jr. 
S/Philip L. Currier 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 



Pursuant to the within Warrant. I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 
posting up attested copies of same at the following places, 
to wit: McFarlin School - All Purpose Room: North Ele- 
mentary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford School; 
Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; South 
Row School Auditorium; South Row School Auditorium; 
Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House - Old Westford 
Road, seven days at least before the time appointed for 
holding the meeting aforesaid. 



S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



ANNUAL TOWN ELECTION 
April 5, 1976 



A true copy, Attest: 
March 25, 1976 
S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 
12 3 4 5 6 7 



SELECTMEN for 3 years (2) 

Arnold J. Lovering (Re-Election) 420 

Karen C.Flynn 339 

William R. Murphy (Re-Election) 392 

Write-in 1 

Blanks 194 
TOTAL 1 346 



ASSESSOR for 3 years 

Claude A. Harvey 
Write-in 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

MEMBER of BOARD of HEALTH 

for 3 years 

Paul F. McCarthy 
Write-In 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

MEMBER of SCH. COMMITTEE 
for 3 years 

Myra Silver 
Stasia Wojtas 
Write-in 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

MEMBER of Nashoba Valley Tech- 
nical High School Dist. Comm. 
for 3 years 

Louis E. Kelly 
Write-in 
Blanks 
TOTAL 



560 

2 

111 

673 



542 



131 

673 



238 456 163 416 443 240 

251 239 158 264 257 226 

224 453 119 391 408 212 

151 134 112 147 146 134 

8641,282 552 1,218 1,254 812 



354 518 231 489 537 334 
2 

78 121 45 120 90 72 

432 641 276 609 627 406 



8 


9 


10 


11 


12 


TOTAL 


371 


294 


440 


343 


467 


4,291 


152 


179 


315 


264 


214 


2,858 


338 


312 


403 


298 


494 


4,044 


1 










2 


110 


103 


190 


153 


161 


1,735 


972 


888 1 


,348 1 


,0581 


,336 


12,930 


398 


349 


540 


444 


523 


5,277 


1 


1 








6 


87 


94 


134 


85 


145 


1,182 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 



344 507 219 469 510 322 386 346 505 426 510 5,086 

3 2 5 

88 131 57 138 V17 84 100 98 169 103 158 1,374 

432 641 276 609 627 406 486 444 674 529 668 6,465 



350 


170 


410 


127 


381 


364 


196 


284 


248 326 


255 


405 


3,516 


250 


193 

2 


187 
1 


117 


186 
2 


210 


166 


165 


162 295 

2 


210 


205 


2,346 

7 


73 


67 


43 


32 


40 


53 


44 


37 


32 53 


64 


58 


596 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 


627 


406 


486 


444 674 


529 


668 


6,465 



528 
i 


324 

1 


491 


214 


479 


510 


318 
1 

87 


390 


337 


502 


417 


485 


4,995 

4 

1.466 


144 


107 


149 


62 


130 


117 


96 


107 


172 


112 


183 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 


627 


406 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 



23 



CEMETERY COMMISSIONER 

for 3 years 

Arne R. Olsen 
Write-in 
Blanks 
TOTAL 

HOUSING AUTHORITY for 5 yrs 

Richard L. Monahan 

Write-In 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE 

for 2 years to fill vacancy 



543 


340 


497 

2 

142 


219 


475 


514 


338 


393 


338 

1 

105 


507 


460 


498 


5,122 

3 

1,340 


130 


92 


57 


134 


113 


68 


93 


167 


69 


170 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 


627 


406 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 


532 


355 


500 


216 


463 


510 


328 


393 


325 


494 


419 


497 


5,032 


3 




2 




1 












2 




8 


138 


77 


139 


60 


145 


117 


78 


93 


119 


180 


108 


171 


1,425 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 


627 


406 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 



Howard K. Moore 


510 


317 


493 


216 


454 505 


316 


394 


333 


494 


415 


505 


4,952 


Write-In 


12 


3 


2 




25 2 


3 


3 




8 


7 


6 


71 


Blanks 


151 


112 


146 


60 


130 120 


87 


89 


111 


172 


107 


157 


1,442 


TOTAL 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 627 


406 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 


PUBLIC LIBRARY TRUSTEE 


























for 3 years (2) 


























Roger P. Welch 


511 


343 


489 


213 


452 509 


346 


392 


323 


489 


408 


497 


4,972 


James M. Geary 


135 


36 


29 


2 


146 65 


55 


49 


24 


21 


55 


29 


646 


Write-in 


10 




12 


1 


2 5 




1 


28 


29 


1 


6 


95 


Blanks 


690 


485 


752 


336 


618 675 


411 


530 


513 


809 


594 


804 


7,217 


TOTAL 1 


,346 


8641,282 


5521 


,2181,254 


812 


972 


888 1,348 1,058 1, 


336 


12,930 


PARK COMMISSIONER for 3 years 


























Bradford O. Emerson 


434 


251 


361 


163 


376 424 


252 


309 


238 


370 


350 


381 


3,909 


Sherwood L. Warren, Jr. 


184 


125 


208 


82 


180 144 


108 


151 


153 


212 


135 


219 


1,901 


Blanks 


55 


56 


72 


31 


53 59 


46 


26 


53 


92 


44 


68 


655 


TOTAL 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 627 


406 


486 


444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 


PLANNING BOARD MEMBER 


























for 3 years (2) 


























Peter M. Laughlin 


347 


222 


288 


143 


288 349 


214 244 229 


323 


290 


280 


3,217 


Henrick R.Johnson, Jr. 


376 


269 


306 


128 


354 375 


240 274 209 


349 


318 


347 


3,545 


Carolyn J. Fenn 


319 


176 


409 


133 


330 294 


170 267 264 


361 


225 


448 


3,396 


Write-In 
















1 








1 


Blanks 


304 


197 


279 


148 


246 236 


188 187 185 


315 


225 


261 


2,791 


TOTAL 1 


,346 


864 : 


1,282 


552 1,218 1,254 


812 972 888 1,348 1,0581,336 


12,930 


SEWER COMMISSION for 3 years 


























Matthew J. Doyle 


513 


323 


489 


208 


463 502 


319 377 327 


463 


417 


483 


4,884 


Write-In 


1 








1 








2 






4 


Blanks 


159 


109 


152 


68 


145 125 


87 109 117 


209 


112 


185 


1,577 


TOTAL 


673 


432 


641 


276 


609 627 


406 486 444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 



SINKING FUND COMMISSIONER 

for 3 years 

Raymond L. Reynolds 499 320 466 205 451 477 311 370 314 469 395 476 4,753 

Write-in 2 14 18 

Blanks 172 112 175 71 158 150 95 115 130 205 130 191 1,704 

TOTAL 673 432 641 276 609 627 406 486 444 674 529 668 6,465 

QUESTION: 

"Shall the Town of Chelmsford parti- 
cipate in the METCO program?" 
The result of such vote shall not be 
deemed to be binding upon the select- 
men and other officers of said Town. 

Y ES 77 26 103 23 74 72 34 

NO 510 348 493 210 462 484 322 

Blanks 86 58 45 43 73 71 50 

TOTA L 673 432 641 276 609 627 406 

24 



57 65 


73 


53 


109 


766 


398 337 


541 


398 


498 


5,001 


31 42 


60 


78 


61 


698 


486 444 


674 


529 


668 


6,465 



ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 

May 3, 1976 

The Annual Town Meeting was called to order at 7:55 
P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who recog- 
nized the presence of a quorum. There were 419 voters 
present. An invocation was read by the Moderator. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Paul C. Hart, 
moved that the reading of the Constable's return of ser- 
vice and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was so 
voted, unanimously. Mr. Hart moved that the reading of 
the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted, unani- 
mously. 

The following tellers were appointed: 

Paul Bienvenue Edward Hilliard 

Thomas Rivard William Dempster 

Ina Greenblatt Carl Olsson 

Selectman Paul C. Hart moved that the reports of 
Town Officers and Committees be heard, under 
Article 1. 

Selectman William Murphy made a motion to nomi- 
nate Robert McManimon to the Varney Playground 
Commission for a three year term. Selectman Thomas 
Plamer made a motion to nominate Harvey Miller to 
the Varney Playground Commission for a three year 
term. A motion was made to close nominations. Motion 
carried. 



are: New Year's Day, Martin Luther King's Birthday. 
Washington's Birthday, Patriot's Day, Memorial Day. 
Independence Day, Labor Day, Columbus Day, Veter- 
ans' Day, Thanksgiving Day, and Christmas. 

Part-time permanent employees are entitled to Holiday 
pay if the Holiday falls on their regularly scheduled work- 
day and for a number of hours equal to the ratio of their 
scheduled work week to the full-time permanent em- 
ployee's work week times the full-time permanent em- 
ployee's work day. 

EXAMPLE: 

Scheduled Hours 20 hrs per wk 

Full-time Hours 37 V& hrs per wkX7!4 hrs 

equals 4 hours Holiday pay. 

19. Hours of work shall be as follows: 

A. Full-time permanent employees 

I. For Town Accountant and those occupying posi- 
tions designated as "clerical"-37 V& hours per 
week. 

II. For those occupying positions designated "Mech- 
anical and Construction Occupation ", Conserva- 
tion and Cemeteries, Custodian and Health-40 
hours per week. 

B. Part-time permanent employees 



A hand vote was taken for the election. 

Robert McManimon 
Harvey Miller 



I. 



Any employee who is scheduled to work 20 hours 
per week or more. 



159 
79 



A motion was made to declare Mr. McManimon 
winner. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Chairman of the Personnel 
Board, David J. McLachlan, moved that the Town vote 
to further amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and 
Standard Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel 
Wage and Salary By-Law" by deleting therefrom the 
following positions: under Administrative and Clerical; 
Personnel Board's Recording Clerk and Planning Board 
Clerk; under Conservation and Cemetery; Cemetery 
Foreman, Cemetery Laborer, Cemetery Equipment Op- 
erator; under Custodial: Custodian (Center Hall), Cus- 
todian (Library), Custodian (Police Department): under 
Recreation: Administrative Assistant to the Recreation 
Commission: and inserting the following positions: under 
Conservation and Cemetery: Park Equipment Operator: 
under Custodial: Custodian: under Recreation: Clerk 
and by inserting under Youth Center: Coordinator, Chief 
Supervisor, Supervisor IV, Supervisor III, Supervisor II, 
Supervisor I, Clerk: and further vote to amend the first 
sentence of Section 14 of said By-Laws by deleting there- 
from the words, "On January 1st" and substituting there- 
for the words, "On July 1st"; and to further amend the 
Personnel, Wage and Salary Administration By-Laws: 

Motion passed. 

15. Legal Holidays 

The legal Holidays to which full-time permanent and 
part-time permanent employees are entitled with pay 



C. (Previously III, Deleted) 

D. (previously IV, no change) 

E. (previously V, no change). 

Motion passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2A. Personnel Board Chairman, 
David J. McLachlan, moved the Town vote to further 
amend Section 24, subtitled "Job Titles and Standard 
Rates for Wages and Salaries of the Personnel Wage 
and Salary By-Law", to conform to rates of pay nego- 
tiated by the Town with certain labor organizations, 
pursuant to General Laws, Chapter 149, Section 178G 
through 178N: 

° Recommended 

Fiscal July 1. 1976 
ADMINISTRATIVE AND CLERICAL 



1. Veteran's Agent 

2. Clerk, Senior 

3. Clerk 

4. Town Accountant 

5. Assistant Treasurer 

6. Town Counsel 

7. Selectmen's Administrative 
Assistant 

8. Board of Registrar's Clerk 

9. Board of Registrar's (3 members) 

10. Clerk, Part-time 

11 . Town Aide 



$10,600.00 p 
8,468.00 p 
6,750.00 p 
15,954.00 p 
9,687.00 p 
500.00 p 

II. 770. 00 p. a 

850.00 pa 

360.00 ca 

3.42 hr 

8.615.00p.a 



Mr. Frank Fisher questioned increases of more than 7% for Line 
Items 1 & 5. Mr. David McLachlan of the Personnel Board stated 
greater responsibilities of these positions merited the increase re- 
commended. 



Motion carried. 



25 



CONSERVATION, PARKS AND CEMETERY 

1. Cemetery Superintendent 

2. Superintendent of Insect & 
Pest Control 

3. Landscaper - Park 

4. Laborer Park 

5. Unskilled Laborer 

6. Skilled Forest Workman 

7. Equipment Operator - Park 

8. Park Superintendent 

Motion carried. 
CUSTODIAL 
1. Custodian 

Motion carried. 
LIBRARY 



1. Librarian MLS 

2. Librarian MLS (Assistant) 

3. Branch Librarian 

4. Senior Assistant Librarian 

5. Junior Assistant Librarian 

6. Clerk 

7. Aides 

Motion Carried. 
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

1 . Highway Superintendent 

2. Highway Foreman 

3. Administrative Assistant 

Motion carried. 
TOWN FIRE DEPARTMENT 

1. Chief 

2. Deputy Chief 

Motion carried. 
TOWN POLICE DEPARTMENT 



1. Chief 

2. Captain 



Motion carried. 



RECREATION 



1. Clerk 

2. Director of Summer Program 



3. Swimming Director 

4. Swimming Instructor 
5 Playground Director 

6. Playground Supervisor 

7. PlaygTound Instructor 

8. Sports Instructor 

Motion carried. 
YOUTH CENTER 



MIN. 
$70.00 wk. 

70.00 wk. 

70.00 wk. 

70.00 wk. 

70.00 wk. 

70.00 wk. 



1. 

2. 
3. 
4. 
5. 


Co-Ore 

Chiefs 
Superv 
Superv 
Superv 


inator 
upervisor 
sorlV 
sor III 
sor II 


b. 

7. 


Superv 
Clerk 


sor I 




Motion 


carried. 


M1SCELL 


ANEOUS 



$14,445.00p.a. 

l,250.00p.a 
4.19hr 
3.83 hr 
2.30 hr 
3.14hr 
4.53 hr 
14,445.00 p. a 



5. Sealer of Weights & Measur 

6. Dog Officer 

7. Assistant Dog Officer 

8. Clock Winder 



2.000.00 p. a. 
7.408.00 p. a. 

5.926.00 p. a. 
100.00 p. a. 



$16,000.00 p. a 
10,826.00 p. a 
9,122.00 p. a 
3.79 hr 
3.23 hr 
3.42 hr 
2.30 hr 



20,512.00p.a. 

6.61 hr. 

9,687.00p.a. 



$21,341.00 p. a. 



$21,341.00p.a. 



3.42 hr. 
1,240.00 p. a. 



MAX. 



1. Animal Inspector 

2. Building Inspector 

3. Gas Inspector 

4. Electric Inspector 



$100.00 wk. 
100.00 wk. 
100.00 wk. 
lOO.OOwk. 
100.00 wk. 
lOO.OOwk. 



$11,057.00 p.a. 
3.99 hr. 
3.87 hr. 
3.58 hr. 
3.33 hr. 
3.08 hr. 
3.42 hr. 



$ 1.000.00 p.a. 
17.093.00 p.a. 
3.750.00 p.a. 
14.000.00 p.a. 



Mr. Normand Labrecque moved to amend Line Item 
2 to read $15,975.00, since he feels 7% should not be 
automatic. Chairman of the Personnel Board, David 
McLachlan, defended the increase; Chairman of the 
Board of Selectmen, Paul Hart, also spoke in favor of 
the increase. A vote was taken on Mr. Labrecque's 
motion to amend - Motion defeated. 

A discussion followed about Line Items 3 & 4. The 
Personnel Board had not reviewed these two items. 
Selectman Philip Currier stated that the Selectmen are 
in favor of a full-time electric inspector. 

A vote was taken on Miscellaneous 1-8. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2B. Chairman of the School Com- 



mittee, William J. Reynolds, moved that the Town vote 
to rescind Paragraph 16C (Sick Leave) from the Per- 
sonnel Wage and Salary Administration By-Law. 

Dismissed 

Mr. Robert Hall moved to dismiss article. Mr. Schenk 

of the Finance Committee supported dismissal. The 

Board of Selectmen also supported dismissal. A vote 

was taken on Mr. Hall's motion-motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Treasurer Philip J. McCormack 
moved that the Town vote to raise and appropriate such 
sums of money as may be required to defray town charges 
for the fiscal period from July 1, 1976 to June 30, 1977. 

Mr. Jeanpaul Gravelle asked for a statement from 
the Finance Committee if all items are approved, what 
is the impact on the tax rate. Mr. Marvin Schenk of the 
Finance Committee estimated a $4.00 increase, making 
the new tax rate $45.50. 



ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

1. Accountant 

2. Senior Clerk (3) 

3. Additional Clerk Hire 

4. Severance 

5. Vacation and Sickness 
Total 

Motion carried. 

EXPENSES: 

6. Expenses 

7. Outlay 
Total 

Motion carried. 

TOTAL ACCOUNTING DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 

8. Inspector's Salary 

9. Expense 

Total ANIMAL INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMI 
Motion carried. 
BOARD OF APPEALS 
10. Clerk Hire 



Finance Committee 
Recommendation 



$15,954.00 

25.404.00 

00.00 

00.00 

1,000.00 



$42,358.00 



$ 1,500.00 
300.00 



1,000.00 
100.00 



26 



1 1 . Expenses 

12. Outlay Account 

Total BOARD OF APPEALS 
ASSESSOR'S 



SALARIES: 

13. Assessor (Full Time) 

14. Board Member (Part Time) 

15. Senior Clerk (4) 

16. Clerk (Part Time) 
Total 

EXPENSES: 

17. Office Expenses 

18. Transportation 

19. Outlays 

20. Data Proc. (Tax Billing) 
Total 

Total ASSESSOR'S DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. 

21. Expenses -- Annual Operation 

22. Accumulation Fund (1975-76) 



1.730.00 
00.00 



$15,954.00 

7,660.00 

33.871.00 

00.00 

$57,485.00 



$ 4,500.00 

1,500.00 

175.00 

7,000.00 

$13,175.00 



Total BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATION COMM. $ 00 

Motion carried. 
BUILDING INSPECTORS DEPARTMENT 



Includes: Zoning By-Law Enforcement 

23. Inspector's Salary 

24. Inspector's Fees 

25. Sr. Clerk 

26. Vacation & Sickness 

27. Transportation 

28. Inspector's Expenses 

29. Out of Town Expenses 
29a. Plumbing Ins. Fees & Transfers 



$17,093.00 
00.00 
1.00 
1.00 
1,511.00 
2,400.00 
250.00 
2,000.00 
Total BUILDING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT $23,256.00 

Motion carried. 



CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

30. Commissioners (3) 

31. Superintendent 

32. General Labor 

33. Special Labor for Lot Owners 
Total 

34. Internments 

35. Transportation Superintendent 

36. Expenses 

Outlays 

37. Town Clerk -- Salary 

38. Town Clerk -- Expenses 

39. Beautification - Perpetual Care 

40. Out of State 

41 . Restore Forefather's and Hart Pond 
Total 

Total CEMETERY DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 
CIVILIAN DEFENSE 




42. Expenses 

43. Outlays 

Total CIVILIAN DEFENSE 

Motion carried. 



$49,000.00 



5,000.00 

300.00 

10,200.00 

f 1,800.00 
00.00 
00.00 
00.00 
300.00 
1,500.00 



$ 4,050.00 
3,000.00 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

44. Expenses 

Motion carried. 
CONSTABLE 

45. Constable's Salary 
Motion carried. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

46. Salary 

47. Expenses 

48. Transportation Expenses 
Total COUNCIL ON AGING 

Motion carried. 

DEBT AND INTEREST 

49. High School Loan No. 1 

50. High School Loan No. 2 

5 1 . Highway Garage Loan 

52. South Row Elementary School Loan 

53. Junior High School Loan 

54. Westland Elem. School & Harrington 
Elem. School Loan 

55. Byam Elementary School Loan 

56. High School- 1972 
DEBT Total 

Motion carried. 

INTEREST 

57. High School Loan No. 1 

58. High School Loan No. 2 

59. Highway Garage Loan 

60. Anticipation of Revenue & 
Reimbursement Loans 

61. South Row Elem. School Loan 

62. Junior High School 

63. Westland Elem. School & Harrignton 
Elem. School Loan 

64. Byam Elementary School Loan 

65. High School- 1972 
INTEREST Total 

Motion carried. 

Total DEBT AND INTEREST 
Motion carried. 
DOG OFFICER 



SALARIES: 

66. Dog Officer 

67. Assistant Dog Officer 

68. Expenses 

Total DOG OFFICER 

Motion carried. 
D.P.W. STUDY COMMISSION - DELETED 

69. Expenses 
DUTCH ELM CONTROL 

70. Superintendent 

71. Expenses 

Total INSECT PEST CONTROL 

Motion carried. 
EDWARDS MEMORIAL BEACH 

72. Expenses 
Motion carried. 



$ 00.00 
8.125.00 
3.000.00 



$ 50.000.00 

85.000.00 

00.00 

45,000.00 

110,000.00 

160,000.00 

105,000.00 

850.000.00 

$1,405,000.00 



$ 1.750.00 

5.440.00 

00.00 

50.000.00 

7,875.00 

27,788.00 

78,260.00 

83,550.00 

243,100.00 

$ 497,763.00 



$1,902,763.00 



$ 7.408.00 
5.926.00 
1,500.00 



00.00 
00.00 



27 



ELECTIONS 

73. Expenses S 19.3' 
Motion carried. 

FINANCE COMMITTEE 

74. Expenses $ L5 1 

Motion carried. 

FIRE DEPARTMENT - Temporarily placed on table pending re- 
port to the Selectmen on negotiations. 

GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT 



82. Inspectors Fees 

83. Inspectors Salary 

84. Expenses 
84a. Transportation 

84b . Out of Town Expense 
84c. Vacation and Sickness 

Total GAS PIPING & FIXTURE DEPARTMENT $ 5,201.00 

Motion carried. 

HEALTH & SANITATION DEPARTMENT 



87 



SALARIES: 

Board Members 

Director of Public Health 

Senior Clerk 

Plubming Insp. (Deleted) 

Physicians 

Vacation and Sickness 

Total 

Motion carried. 



00.00 

3.750.00 

600.00 

750.00 

100.00 

1.00 



828.00 
19.260.00 
8.468.00 

1.000.00 
500.00 



114. Vacations and Sickness 

115. Labor -- Overtime 

116. Radio Outlay and Equipment 

117. Radio Repairs and Services 

ROAD MACHINERY ACCOUNT: 

118. Repairs 

119. Snow and Ice Removal 

120. Highway Bridges & Drainage Cost. 

121. Chapter 90 Maintenance 

122. Sidewalks 
Total 

Motion carried. 

Total HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

123. Expenses 
Motion carried. 

HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

124. Expenses 
Motion carried. 

HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 

125. Center 

126. North 

127. East 

128. South 

Total HYDRANT SERVICE DEPARTMENT 



36.400.00 

7.000.00 

00.00 

540.00 



23.750.00 

198.905.00 

47.000.00 

00.00 

7.000.00 

SI. 088. 652. 00 



SI. 129. 931. 00 



$ 33,840.00 
10.500.00 
4,300.00 
4,000.00 

$ 52,640.00 



EXPENSES: 

91. Health and Professional Services 

92. Mosquito Control Study 

93. Transportation Directors 

94. Other Expenses 

95. Out of State Expense 

96. Outlay 

97. Blood Program 

Total 

Motion carried. 



Total Salaries & Expenses 
Motion carried. 
HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

98. Superintendent 

99. Administrative Assistant-Highway 

100. Engineer's Fees 

101. Sr. Clerk 

102. Clerk Hire 

Total 
Motion carried. 

EXPENSES: 

103. Utilities and Misc. Expense 

104. Street Signs 

105. Waste Collection 

106. Annual Waste Clean Up Days 

107. Maintenances Repair to Garage 

108. Outlays 

HIGHWAYS. BRIDGES AND DRAINAGE 

109. Highway Materials 

110. Miscellaneous Equipment & Small Tool 

111. Stabilization Fund Equipment 

112. Machinery Hire - Other 

113. Labor - Men 



J 


4,700.00 




400.00 




1,500.00 




1,980.00 




300.00 




00.00 




250.00 


s 


9,130.00 



20.512.00 
9,687.00 

10,000.00 

00.00 

1,080.00 



30,600.00 

2.300.00 

380.987.00 

9.000.00 

750.00 

00.00 



78.000.00 
1.500.00 

10.000.00 

6,000.00 

248.920.00 



Motion carried. 
INSECT PEST CONTROL 

129. Superintendent's Salary 

130. Expenses 

Total INSECT PEST CONTROL 



$ 1,250.00 
12,850.00 



After a discussion about where this money is spent a voice vote 
was taken which was questioned. A hand vote was also questioned. 
A Hand Count was taken: 



YES 175 No 124 

INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 



Motion carried. 



131. Prop. Liab. & All Types of Ins. 

132. Chapter 32B Insurance - Employees 

133. Police Professional Liability 

Total INSURANCE DEPARTMENT 

Liability Insurance - Selectmen . . 00. 

Motion carried. 
LAW DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

134. Town Counsel 

EXPENSES: 

135. Legal Services 

136. Misc. Exp. Association Dues 
Total LAW DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

137. Librarian 

138. Assistant Director 

139. Branch Librarian 

140. Assistant Librarians 

141. Library Aides 



$ 158,700.00 
255.000.00 

00.00 

$ 413.700.00 



$ 14.000.00 
1,000.00 



16,000.00 
10.836 00 

9.130.00 
84.973.00 

5.350.00 



28 



13.332.00 

3.077.00 

S 142.698.00 



3.500.00 
11.100.00 
44.000.00 
8.000.00 
2,400.00 
69.000.00 



12,574.00 
$ 199,124.00 



142. Custodian & Security 

143. Vacation & Sickness 
Total 

EXPENSES: 

144. Repair & Maintenance of Bldgs. 

145. Fuel, Light and Water 

146. Books and Periodicals 

147. Other Expenses 

148. Outlays 
Total 

Total LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

State Funds Received 

NET LIBRARY DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

MODERATOR 



149. Moderator's Salary 300.00 

Motion carried. 

NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL - Chelmsford 
assessment 44.63% 411,427.00 

Mr. James Harrington moved we pay our share of the operating 
and maintenance budget. 

It was so voted. 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

150. Labor 

151. Expenses 

152. Outlays 

153. Recreation Field Maintenance Labor 

154. Recreation Field Maintenance Exp. 
Total PARK DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

PERSONNEL BOARD 

155. Expenses 
Motion carried. 

PLANNING BOARD 

156. Clerk Hire 

157. Expenses 

158. Outlay 

159. Consultant 

160. Greater Lowell Planning Fee (NMAC) 
Total PLANNING BOARD 

Motion carried. 

POLICE DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES: 

161. Officers and Administration 

162. Regular and Special Account 
Total 

163. Maintenance and Equipment 

164. Chief s Out of State Expense 

165. Outlays 

166. Special and Education. Out of State 

167. Regional Tactical Unit. Expenses 
Total 

Total POLICE DEPARTMENT 
Motion carried. 
PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

168. Janitor's Salary 

169. Vacation and Sickness 



17.445.00 
3,650.00 
600.00 
3,710.00 
2,000.00 



$ 11.250.00 



$ 174.283.00 

799,064.00 

$ 973,347.00 

$ 85.696.00 

150.00 

00.00 

1,600.00 

1,500.00 

88,946.00 

$1,062,293.00 



7.857.00 
380.00 



EXPENSES: 

170. Fuel. Light and Water 

171. Repairs. Equipment and Expenses 

172. Outlavs 



Total 

Total PUBLIC BUILDINGS DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 

RECREATION COMMISSION 



11.000.00 

27.850.00 

300.00 



173. Salaries, Directors & Asst. Youth 

174. Expenses, Youth 

175. Outlay 

Total RECREATION DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 
EAST SCHOOL 



176. Expenses 

177. Salaries, Custodians 
Total EAST SCHOOL 

Motion carried. 

REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

178. Registrars (3) 

179. Ass't. Registrars: Wages & Mileage 

180. Clerk 

181. Census 
Total 

EXPENSES: 

182. Printing: Men-Women Directory 

183. Printing: Voters' Lists 

184. Other Expenses 



$ 


27,405.00 


185. Data Processing 
Total 
Total REGISTRAR'S DEPARTMENT 

Motion carried. 


$ 


650.00 


SCHOOL BUILDING COMMITTEE 




186. Clerk 






187. Out of State Travel 






188. Expenses 


$ 


1.750.00 
1.250.00 


Total 




250.00 


Motion Carried. 




8.000.00 






00.00 


Mr. Matthew J. Doyle moved thai 



16.510.00 
102.264.00 



S 134.259.00 



8.848.00 
1.00 



1.080.00 
00.00 
4,524.00 
3.700.00 
9.304.00 



1,100.00 

400.00 

825.00 

2.400.00 

4,725.00 



500.00 
00.00 
00.00 



Items 189-226, inclusive be heard at the specific time 
8:00 P.M., May 10, 1976. 

Chairman of the School Committee, William J. 
Reynolds, was opposed to this motion. The Finance 
Committee was also opposed to taking articles out of 
order. A vote was taken on Mr Doyle's motion. Motion 
defeated. 

Henrietta Rycroft and seven voters questioned the vote. 
A hand count was taken: 



YES -- 63 
NO -201 



Motion defeated. 



Chairman of the School Committee, William J. 
Reynolds, moved the sum of $12,237,361.00 be raised 
and appropriated for the operation of the Chelmsford 
public schools including vocational education, said sum 
to be reduced by the use of available and anticipated 
Federal funds of 192,364.00 and educational and colla- 
borative funds of $19,000.00 to 512,237,361.00. 



29 



Chairman of the School Committee, William J. 
Reynolds, reviewed the School Budget. Mr. Michael Folk 
made a motion to amend line Item 205 to read $6,000.00 
instead of 00.00. Motion to amend defeated. Mr. Paul 
Krenitsky moved to amend line Item 189 to read $26,000 
instead of $42,000. After a lengthy debate Mr. Joseph 
Gutwein made a motion to stop debate. It was so voted, 
unanimously. A vote was taken on Mr. Krenitsky's 
motion to amend. It was so voted. Mr. George Ripsom 
made a motion to stop debate on the main motion as 
amended. Mr. Normand Labrecque questioned the 
quorum. A count was taken; 230 voters were present. 
A count was taken on Mr. Ripsom's motion to stop de- 
bate. 



YES - 175 
NO -26 



Motion carried. 



A vote was taken on the main motion, School Budget 
as amended - $12,237,361.00. Motion carried. Mr. 
Jeanpaul Gravelle made a motion to reconsider the 
school budget as amended. Mr. Edward McKeon ques- 
tioned the presence of a quorum. A count was taken, 
showing 210 voters present. A vote was taken on Mr. 
Gravelle's motion to reconsider the school budget. 
Motion defeated. Mr. Gravelle questioned the decision 
of the Moderator. A raising of hands showed no re- 
consideration. 



SCHOOL DEPARTMENT 

189. School Committee 

190. Superintendent's Office 

191. Supervision 

192. Principals 

193. Teaching 

194. Textbooks 

195. Library 

196. Audio/ Visual 

197. Guidance 

198. Career Education 

199. School Attendance 

200. Health Services 

201. Transportation 

202. Food Services 

203. Athletics 

204. Other Student Activities 

205. Driver Education 

206. Health Education 

207. Custodial 

208. Utilities 

209. Maintenance of Grounds 

210. Maintenance of Buildings 

211. Maintenance of Equipment 

212. Adult Education 

213. Civic Activities 

214. Programs with other Schools 
Subtotal 



Recommended 
July 1, 1976 



26 

239 

240 

609 

7,229 

122 

259 

136 

343. 

20, 

16 

79, 

760, 

54, 

114, 



596 
400 
22 
61 
49 
20 
6 



000.00 
392.00 
533.00 
234.00 
366.00 
376.00 
704.00 
472.00 
633.00 
533.00 
950.00 
998.00 
600.00 
200.00 
825.00 
000.00 
00.00 
00.00 
309.00 
385.00 
750.00 
270.00 
940.00 
267.00 
550.00 
000.00 



$11,454,287.00 



Chapter 766 


$ 894,438.00 


Subtotal 


$12,348,725.00 


Total 

Minus PL 875 


$12,348,745.00 
92,364.00 


Subtotal 
Minus Educational Collaborative Fund 


$12,256,361.00 
19.000.00 


Total Town Funds 


$12,237,361.00 


RECEIPTS 




215. State Education Aid Law 

216. Tuition & Transportation of 
State Wards 


$ 2,823,762.00 


217. School Transportation 

218. Rental of Auditoriums 


751,207.00 
100.00 



219 
220 
221 
222 
223 
224 
225 



Custodial Services 

Special Education Chapter 766 

Vocational Education 

Dog Licenses 

Miscellaneous 

Adult Evening Education 

Education Collaborative Fund 



Total RECEIPTS 
NET COST TO CHELMSFORD 



18.000.00 

703.484.00 

28.643.00 

4.863.00 

4.000.00 

10.680.00 

92.364.00 

$ 4,456.103.00 

$ 7.781.258.00 



Selectman Paul Hart made a motion to adjourn at 
11:00 P.M., until Monday, May 10, 1976, at 7:30 
P.M. in the High School Gymnasium. It was so voted. 

Daniel J. Coughlin 
Moderator 

Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 10, 1976 

The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:50 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr., who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 347 voters present. The following tellers were 
appointed: 



Paul Bienvenu 
Ina Greenblatt 
Edward Hilliard 



Dorothy Lerer 

Carl Olsson 

Ruth Delaney 



Mr. Matthew Doyle questioned the Moderator about 
a motion he had presented in writing last week, but was 
not recognized. He questioned whether this amendment 
could still be heard. Mr. Coughlin advised him that it 
could not be heard at this meeting, and that all requests 
to use Town Counsel must be given in writing to the 
Selectmen. 

Chairman of Board of Selectmen, Paul Hart, moved 
that the Fire Department Budget be taken from the 
table. It was so voted. 

Mr. Paul Hart moved that the Town vote to appro- 
priate and transfer from Revenue Sharing Funds the sum 
of $339,717.53 and to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $798,667.47 for Fire Department salaries (total: 
$1,138,385) and further raise and appropriate the sum 
of $68,870 for the Fire Department expenses (total: 
$1,207,255.). 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 



SALARIES : 

75. Officers and Administration 

76. Regular and Substitute Account 

77. Severance Pay 

Total 



78. Maintenance and Equipment 

79. Outlays 

80. Out of State 

81. Stabilization Fund (Equipment) 

Total 

Total FIRE DEPARTMENT 



Recommended 
lulyl, 1976 



$ 131,968.00 

988,440.00 

17,977.00 

$1,138,385.00 

49,950.00 

3.520.00 

400.00 

15.000.00 

68,870.00 

$1,207,255.00 



30 



Mr. Normand Labrecque questioned the increase. 
Selectmen Murphy explained the latest figures were not 
available when the warrant book was printed because 
of union negotiations. Fire Chief Frederick Reid stated 
the increase in salaries is also due to the fact that eight 
new firefighters have been included for the new fire 
station in East Chelmsford. 

A vote was taken on the main motion, total Fire 
Department Budget $1,207,255.00. It was so voted. 



Recommended 
|uly 1, 1976 



$ 2.000.00 

300.00 

$ 2.300.00 



1.500.00 

4.000.00 

11,700.00 

5.000.00 

5.353.00 

8,467.00 

1.396.00 

256.00 

477.00 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS AND MEASURES 

228. Salary 

229. Expenses 
Total 

It was so voted. 

SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

230. Chairman 

231. Board Members 

232. Selectmen Adm. Asst. 

233. Labor Relations Advisor 

234. Clerk (2) (Part-time) 

235. Senior Clerk (Full-time) 

236. Purchasing Agent 

237. Town Planner 
237a. Recreation Supervisor 

Total 

EXPENSES: 

238. Expenses 

239. Conference Expenses 

240. Outlays 

24 1 . Emergencv Employment 

242. Out of State 

243. Purchasing Agent 

244. Local Growth Policy Comm. 

245. Photo Copy Machine 

246. Insurance for Selectmen 
Total 

Total SELECTMEN'S DEPARTMENT 



Mr. Joseph M. Gutwein of the Sewer Commission 
moved to amend the Sewer Commission Department 
Budget Line Item No. 247, Professional Expenses, to 
read $25,000 instead of 00. It was so voted. 



SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 

247. Professional Fee 

248. Expenses 

Total SEWER COMMISSION DEPARTMENT 

It was so voted, as amended. 
STREET LIGHTING 
248. Street Lighting 

It was so voted. 
TOWN AIDE 



$ 


38.219.00 


$ 


6,716.00 




1,000.00 




510.00 




00.00 




250.00 




1,245.00 




250.00 




5,500.00 




00.00 


$ 


15,471.00 



$ 25.000.00 
1,000.00 



250. Salary 

251. Expenses 
Total 

It was so voted. 

TOWN CELEBRATION COMMITTEE 

252. Expenses 

It was so voted. 



$ 8.615.00 
950.00 



S 13.500.00 
16.936.00 



4.500.00 

50.00 

1.00 

00.00 



$ 39,494.00 



TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

253. Town Clerk 

254. Senior Clerk (2) 

255. Clerk (Part-time) 

256. Clerk (Overtime) 
Total 

EXPENSES: 

257. Expenses 

258. Board of Appeals- Variance Rec. Fees 

259. Printing By-Laws Books 

260. Outlays 
Total 

Total TOWN CLERK DEPARTMENT 

It was so voted. 
TOWN FOREST COMMITTEE 

261. Expenses 

It was so voted. 
TREASURER & COLLECTOR DEPARTMENT 



Mr. Edward Hilliard moved to amend Line 262 from 
$17,230.00 to $18,000.00. It was so voted. 

SALARIES: 

262. Treasurer & Collector $ 18,000.00 

263. Assistant Treasurer 9,687.00 

264. Senior Clerk (5) 42,340.00 

265. Clerk 00.00 

266. Vacation & Sickness 2,000.00 
Total $ 72.027.00 

EXPENSES: 

267. Postage $ 9,000.00 

268. Printing, Advertising, Binding & 

Stationery 2,000.00 

269. Bonds 850.00 

270. Expenses 3,800.00 

271. Outlays 00.00 

272. Machine Hire 00.00 

273. Data Processes, Payroll 00.00 

274. Purchase NCR 400 Acct. Machine 00.00 
Total $ 15,650.00 
Total TREASURERS COLLECTOR DEPT. $ 87,677.00 

TREE WARDEN'S DEPARTMENT 

SALARIES: 

275. Tree Warden $ 800.00 

276. Fees 4,000.00 
Total $ 4,800.00 

EXPENSES: 

277. Other Expenses $ 13,450.00 

278. Outlay 600.00 

Total $ 14,050.00 

Total TREE WARDEN DEPARTMENT $ 18.850.00 

It was so voted. 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 

279. Town & Finance Committee Reports $ 10,000.00 
It was so voted. 

280. CATV Committee 250.00 
It was so voted. 

281. Expenses for Memorial Day 1,500.00 
It was so voted. 

282. Development & Industrial Commission -■ Deleted 

282. Expense for Town Clock 300.00 
It was so voted. 

283. Development & Industrial Commission 100.00 
It was so voted. 

284. Ambulance Service 15.000.00 
It was so voted. 



31 



285. Lowell Mental Health Association 
It was so voted. 

286. Veteran Pension Claims 
It was so voted. 

287. Chelmsford Industrial Development 
Financing Authority 

It was so voted. 

288. D. P. W. Committee 
It was so voted. 

289. Historic District Committee 



8.695.00 
4,586.00 

100.00 

170.00 
250.00 



Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to amend Line 289 to read 
$1,000.00. The Finance Committee was opposed to this 
amendment. A voice vote was taken which left Chair 
in doubt. A second voice vote was taken, Motion passed. 
Mr. George Ripsom and more than six voters questioned 
vote. A hand vote indicated the motion to amend was 
defeated. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. Motion carried. 

UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS (Continued) 

290. Bus Transportation Subsidy $ 28,000.00 
It was so voted. 

291. Share Inc. (Drug Rehabilitation) 23,737.00 
It was so voted. 

292. NMAC Assessment 8,592.00 
It was so voted. 

Total UNCLASSIFIED DEPARTMENTS 101,280.00 

Mr. Marvin Schenk moved to reconsider the Fire De- 
partment Budget. No reconsideration was required. 

VARNEY PLAYGROUND 



293. 
294. 
295. 


Labor 

Expenses 
Outlays 


s 


2,450.00 
3,000.00 
1.600.00 




Total VARNEY PLAYGROUND 


$ 


7,050.00 


It 


was so voted. 






VETERANS BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 


t 




295. 
297. 
298. 
299. 
300. 


Salary of Veteran's Agent 

Clerical 

Expenses 

Outlay 

Cash and Material Grants 


10,600.00 

1.00 

2,000.00 

175.00 

75,000.00 




Total VETERANS BENEFITS DEPARTMENT 


$ 


87,776.00 



It was so voted. 



WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 



301. 


Inspector's Fees 


$ 00.00 


302. 


Inspector's Salary 


14,000.00 


303. 


Expenses 


1,000.00 


304. 


Senior Clerk ( V2 ) 


1.00 


305. 


Vacation & Sickness 


1.00 


306. 


Transportation 


1,500.00 


307. 


Out of Town Expenses 


250.00 




Total WIRING INSPECTOR'S DEPARTMENT 


$ 16.752.00 



Mr. George Ripsom moved to amend Line 302 to read 
$5,000. Selectman Lovering supported the $14,000 figure 
for full time Inspector. The Finance Committee opposed 
amendment. Mr. Normand Labrecque spoke in favor 
of it. The amendment was defeated by voice vote. 

A vote was taken on the Total Wiring Inspector's 
Department budget of $16,752.00. It was so voted. 



YOUTH CENTER 

Mr. Norman H. Douglas moved to amend the Youth 
Center Budget as follows: 

Change Line 308 from $21 ,709 to $22,619. 
Change Line 309 from $4,551 to $8,016. 
Change Line 310 from $1,925 to $1,140. 
Change Line 311 from $7,260 to 00. 
Change Total from $35,445 to $31,775. 

A vote was taken on the amendment. Motion passed. 



YOUTH CENTER 

308. Salaries 

309. Expenses 

310. Outlay 

311. Building Operation 
Total YOUTH CENTER 



Recommended 
July 1, 1976 



$ 22,619.00 

8,016.00 

1,140.00 

00.00 

$ 31,775.00 



A vote was taken on the main motion as amended. 
It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Town Treasurer, 
with the approval of the Selectmen, to borrow money 
from time to time in anticipation of the revenue of the 
financial year beginning July 1, 1976: in accordance 
with the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 44, Sec- 
tion 4, and to issue a note or notes therefor, payable 
within one year, and to renew any note or notes as may 
be given for a period of less than one year in accordance 
with General Laws, Chapter 44, Section 17. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Mr. Philip J. McCormack moved 
that the Town vote to request the Department of Cor- 
porations and Taxation, Division of Accounts of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to make an audit of 
all accounts in all departments in the Town of Chelms- 
ford. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$241.67 with which to meet bills for previous years. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Mr. Paul Hart moved that the 
Town vote to approve the filing of a Petition in the 
General Court under the provisions of Section 8 of Arti- 
cle 89 or the Amendments to the Constitution for an 
act: Enabling the Town to pay the sum of $31,714.69 
to Leo R. Dumont & Sons, Inc. and the sum of 
$1,168.50 toJ.M. Richards Company, Inc., and the sum 
of $987.36 to Maxwell Supply Company. Said bills having 
been incurred by the Chelmsford School Building Com- 
mittee in connection with the completion of the New 
Chelmsford High School on Graniteville Road. Said work 
having been satisfactorily performed and completed 
between September and November, 1975. Said work 
being the completion of certain work left incomplete 
by the General Contractor for the New Chelmsford High 
School at the time his contract was terminated. 



32 



Selectmen Lovering spoke in favor of this article, which 
totaled $33,870.55. This is not a money vote; the money 
is already there. 

A vote was taken on the motion. It was so voted, 
unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that the 
Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$413,185.84 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement System, the said amount being the Town's 
share of the pension, expense, and military service funds. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Mr. Marvin Schenk moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$250,000.00, to be used as a Reserve Fund at the dis- 
cretion of the Finance Committee, as provided in General 
Laws, Chapter 40, Section 6. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
participate and file an application for funds under the 
Department of Housing and Urban Development Act 
of 1974. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 11. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,296.00 for the purchase of a 12 passenger Van and 
to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale the 1974 Van 
presently being used by the Council on Aging. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 12. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the location of the Salt Storage Shed, the purchase of 
which was authorized under Article 23 at the Annual 
Town Meeting held on May 5, 1975, be located on Town- 
owned property. 

Mr. Schenk stated that the Finance Committee is 
opposed to this article; Mr. Thomas Palmer stated the 
Board of Selectmen support article. After other objec- 
tions were heard a voice vote was taken which was 
questioned. A hand vote defeated article. 

Mr. Marvin Schenk of the Finance Committee moved 
to reconsider Article II. A voice vote was taken which 
left Chair in doubt, a second vote defeated motion. 

UNDER ARTICLE 13. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to transfer the sum of $2,841.60 from the 
Road Machinery Fund; $10,000 from the Stabilization 
Fund; and raise and appropriate the sum of $51,790 
for the purchase of equipment for the Highway De- 
partment, such purchase to be made under the super- 
vision of the Board of Selectmen, and to authorize the 
Board of Selectmen to dispose of equipment presently 
being used by the Highway Department as follows: 

(a) To purchase one Dump Truck for the Highway De- 
partment and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale 
one dump truck presently being used by the Highway 
Department. 



(b) To purchase one Truck Chassis for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one truck chassis presently being used by the High- 
way Department. 

(c) To purchase one Front End Loader for the High- 
way Department and to sell by good and sufficient 
bill of sale one front end loader presently being used by 
the Highway Department. 

(d) To purchase one Pickup Truck for the Highway 
Department and to sell by good and sufficient bill of 
sale one pick up truck presently being used by the 
Highway Department. 



TOTAL 



$64,631.60 



A 2/3 vote required -- Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 14. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$22,756.20 for the purpose of purchasing six (6) new 
1976 -- four door sedans to be used by the Police Depart- 
ment, said purchase to be made under the supervision 
of the Board of Selectmen; and to authorize the Select- 
men to transfer by a good and sufficient bill of sale, title 
to one (1) 1973, one (1) 1974 and four (4) 1975 cruisers 
now being used by the Police Department. 

Motion carried. 



UNDER ARTICLE 15. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$1,400.00 to match LEAA Federal Funds, for the pur- 
pose of providing mutual aid programs for police de- 
partments. 

Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 16. Chairman of the Recreation 
Commission, Mr. William A. Dempster, Jr., moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $250,000.00 to construct outdoor lighting system at 
the Chelmsford High School Athletic Field located on 
Graniteville Road. 

Mr. Dempster spoke in favor of this Article. The 
Committee was opposed to it; this expenditure would 
represent a $1 .00 increase on the tax rate. 

Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 17. Selectman Thomas Palmer 
moved to dismiss this article (Re: $9,000 for purchasing 
lighting fixtures to be erected on the site of the South- 
well Softball Field in No. Chelmsford). Motion carried - 
article dismissed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 18. Mr. Arne R. Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $5,000.00 from the Perpetual 
Care Interest Account to the General Labor Account. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 19. Mr. Arne R. Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $5,000.00 from the Perpetual 
Care Interest Account to the Beautification Account. 

It was so voted. 



33 



UNDER ARTICLE 20. Mr. Arne R. Olsen moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$4,571.85 for the purchase of an air compressor for the 
Cemetery Department. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 21 . Mr. George Baxendale moved to 
dismiss this article (Re: $1,352.00 to purchase 2 tents 
for the Cemetery Department). 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 22. Chairman of the Chelmsford 
Historical Commission, Audrey A. Carragher, moved 
that the Town vote to designate the following roads as 
scenic roads under the provisions of Chapter 40, Section 
15C to preserve the historical and natural character 
and physical appearance of such roads: 

High Street from Acton Road to Locust Street; 
Parker Road from Concord Road to Acton Road; 
Robin Hill Road in its entirety. 

After a discussion a voice vote was taken. This vote 
was questioned. A hand vote was taken. Motion passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 23. Chairman of the Chelmsford 
Historic District Commission, Mr. Stephen Wojcik, 
moved that the Town vote to adopt the Appeal Pro- 
cedure set forth in General Laws Chapter 40C, Section 
12, specifying the Northern Middlesex Area Commission 
as the agency to review the determinations of the 
"Chelmsford Historic District Commission". 

Mr. Wojcik spoke in favor of article. The Board of 
Selectmen and Finance Committee opposed it. A voice 
vote was taken which was questioned. A hand count was 
taken --2/3 vote needed. 



YES 23 



NO 153 Motion defeated. 



UNDER ARTICLE 24. Since Article 23 was defeated, 
Mr. Stephen Wojcik moved to dismiss Article 24. It was 
so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 25. Chairman of the Board of 
Health, Paul F. McCarthy, moved that the Town vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $9,000.00 to retain 
a consulting engineering firm to develop operational 
landfill plans. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 26. Chairman of the Board of 
Health, Paul F. McCarthy, moved that the Town vote 
to withdraw from the Central Massachusetts Mosquito 
Control District. 

Mr. McCarthy gave reasons for his motion - to keep 
expenditures on mosquito control at the local level. 
Mr. William Murphy introduced Mr. Clarence Tourville, 
acting superintendent for the Central Massachusetts 
Mosquito Control District, who gave a report on what 
had been accomplished by the District. After a discussion 
on the subject, Mr. Russell Howe made a motion to 
stop debate. A 2/3 vote required -- It was so voted, 
unanimously. A vote was taken on the main motion. 
It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 27. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town vote 
to raise and appropriate the sum of $1,800.00, to be 
used to join or buy into the Merrimack Valley Home 
Care Center, Inc. for the purpose of obtaining services 
for the care of the Town's older Americans. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 27A. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum of 
$600.00 to obtain the necessary surveys and plans for 
the acceptance of Ideal Avenue Extension. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 28. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to accept the following mentioned streets, 
as laid out by the Board of Selectmen, and shown by 
their reports and plans duly filed in the Office of the 
Town Clerk: 

Cranberry Lane 

Higate Road 

Livery Road Extension 

Providing all construction of same meets with the re- 
quirements of the Board of Selectmen, and subject to 
the withholding of any remaining bonds until such 
requirements have been met. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 29. Mrs. Barbara Langworthy 
moved that the Town vote to adopt the following By- 
Law: 

"Copies of the Finance Committee Report, including 
the Warrant for each Annual Town Meeting shall be 
mailed or otherwise delivered by the Finance Committee 
to each residence of one or more registered voters of 
record no later than two weeks prior to the meeting." 

Mrs. Langworthy moved to amend this article to read: 

"Copies of the Finance Committee Report, including 
the warrant, for each Annual Town Meeting shall be 
made available by the Finance Committee to registered 
voters of record not less than two weeks prior to the 
meeting." 

A vote was taken on amendment -- motion carried. 
A vote was taken on the main motion as amended. 
Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 30. Mr. Donald A. House, Chair- 
man of the Conservation Commission, moved that the 
Town vote to amend the By-Law relating to Chelmsford 
Conservation Commission Reservations by adding Sec- 
tion 12 as follows: 

12. No person or persons, including but not limited 
to individuals, associations, partnerships, corporations, 
trusts or public or quasi-public bodies, shall dump any 
material, trash, refuse, rubbish, garbage, or debris, 
including without limiting the generality of the foregoing 
lumber, bricks, asphalt, plaster, wire, lath, paper, card- 
board, pipe, tires, ashes, refrigerators, motor vehicles, 
or parts of the foregoing without permission by vote of 
the Commission. 



34 



Any violator of this section, who shall fail to remove 
any of the foregoing items so dumped, after being 
notified by the Conservation Commission or its duly 
authorized agent to remove same, shall be subject to a 
fine of not more than $50.00. Each day any or all of said 
items shall remain, after issuance of such notification to 
the violator, shall be a separate offense. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 31. Mr. John McCormack moved 
for dismissal of this article since it is not legal as it is 
written in the warrant. The revised article will appear 
on the May 24, 1976, special town meeting warrant. 
(Re: Purchase of 32.5 acres of land on Southwest corner 
of Crystal Lake for recreation & conservation). After a 
discussion a voice vote was taken -- motion carried. 
Decision of Moderator questioned. A hand vote was 
taken. Motion for dismissal passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 32. Mr. Donald A. House moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $6,500.00 in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws Chapter 132 A and Chapter 40, as amended, to 
purchase a certain parcel of land containing 20.47 acres, 
more or less, located in Chelmsford off the Lowell 
Turnpike for conservation purposes, said parcel being 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
at Book 2099, Page 687: and to authorize the Con- 
servation Commission to enter into a contractural self- 
help agreement with the Massachusetts Department of 
Natural Resources. 



ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Reserve Fund the amount of $1,201 and trans- 
fer from available funds the amount of $73,611 to the 
following- named accounts in the Fire Department: 



1 . Officers and Administration 

2. Regular & Substitute Account 

3. Maintenance & Equipment 

or act in relation thereto. 



$ 8,742; 
$64,695; 
$ 1,375; 



Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$49,979 for Chapter 90 Construction; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to raise and 
appropriate or transfer from available funds the sum of 
$19,279 for Chapter 90 Construction; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to expend funds in the amount 
of $160,989 for various projects in accordance with pro- 
visions of Chapter 825, Section 1, Acts of 1974; or act 
in relation thereto. 



After a discussion a vote was taken. 2/3 required. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

Mr. Gordon Reed moved for adjournment at 10:45 
P.M. until Monday, May 24, 1976, at 7:30 P.M. in the 
High School Gymnasium. It was so voted. 

WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 24, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in the Chelmsford High 
School Gymnasium on Monday, the twenty-fourth day of 
May, 1976, at 8:00 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then 
and there to act upon the following articles, viz: 

ARTICLE 1. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from the Reserve Fund the amount of $68,799 to the 
following-named accounts in the Police Department: 



1 . Officers and Administration 

2. Regular & Substitute Account 

3. Maintenance & Equipment 

or act in relation thereto. 



$ 9,598 
$57,926 
$ 1,275 



Board of Selectmen 



Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to petition 
the Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the enactment of a special act entitled 
"An Act establishing terms of office for members of the 
Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford", said act 
-being as follows: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of section eighty-one 
A of chapter forty-one of the General Laws or any other 
general or special law to the contrary, the members of 
the planning board of the town of Chelmsford shall be 
elected for terms of three years each, except that at the 
annual town election to be held in 1977, one member 
shall be elected for a term of three years and one 
member shall be elected for a term of four years; there- 
after in subsequent years all members shall be elected 
for terms of three years each; 



or act in relation thereto. 



Planning Board 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to waive the 
requirement, voted at the Adjourned Annual Town 
Meeting of May 19, 1975, that Article 3, Line 157. 
Consultant, shall be used only as Chelmsford's partici- 
pation in the Comprehensive Planning and Management 
Program, Section 701, of the U.S. Department of 
Housing and Urban Development; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Planning Board 

ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds the sum of $3,800.00 to be ex- 

35 



pended by the School Committee on the Swim Team; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 



ARTICLE 9. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to acquire in fee simple by 
eminent domain for conservation purposes in accordance 
with Massachusetts General Laws, Ch. 132A, Section 11, 
Ch. 40, Section 8C, and Ch. 79, the following des- 
cribed land with the trees and structures thereon: 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts bounded as follows: Commencing at a point 
at land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
known as Route 3, and the southwesterly corner of land 
now or formerly of Edward Brule, Jr., also known as 
Edouard Brule, Jr., which land is shown on the Assessors' 
Maps of the Town of Chelmsford as Plat 61, Lot 71P, 
and is described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1554, Page 
54; thence running northerly along the westerly line 
of said Brule land to a point at other land of said Brule 
shown on said Assessors' Maps as Plat 63, Lot 42, and 
described in said deed; thence westerly along said last 
described Brule land to a point on the southerly side 
of Thirteenth Avenue; thence westerly along the souther- 
ly side of Thirteenth Avenue to a point on the easterly 
side of Twiss Road; thence northerly along the easterly 
side of Twiss Road to a point at the southerly corner 
of Fairview Cemetery and the northwesterly side of 
Needham Street; thence northeasterly along the north- 
westerly side of Needham Street and the southeasterly 
side of Fairview Cemetery to a point at the northeasterly 
corner of Fairview Cemetery and the southeasterly corner 
of land now or formerly of James J. and Carol G. Femia; 
thence southeasterly at a right angle to a point on the 
southeasterly side of Needham Street; thence north- 
easterly along the southeasterly side of Needham Street 
to a point on the southerly side of Ninth Avenue; thence 
easterly along the southerly side of Ninth Avenue to a 
point on the easterly side of Willis Drive; thence norther- 
ly and easterly along Willis Drive in various courses to 
a point on the southerly side of Willis Drive which 
point is the northeasterly corner on Willis Drive of 
that parcel of land conveyed to Thomas Quinn Co. 
Inc. by deed of Anella A. Crockett dated June 2, 1966, 
and recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of 
Deeds at Book 1753, Page 451 shown as Parcel Three 
in said deed; thence southerly along the said land of 
Thomas Quinn Co., Inc. to Crystal Lake, also known 
as Newfield Pond; thence westerly and by other various 
courses along the shore of the southwesterly portion of 
Crystal Lake, also known as Newfield Pond, at elevation 
121.0 to a point at land of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts and known as Route 3; thence westerly, 
southwesterly and westerly along said Route 3 to the 
point of beginning. 

Included within the above taking is the fee in all 
abutting streets and ways insofar as the same may be 
held, owned or possessed by the owners from whom land 
is taken hereby, including but not limited to the en- 
tirety of Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth and 
Fourteenth Avenues, Marion and Florence Roads and 
Murphy Street and that portion of Willis Drive com- 
mencing at the southerly line of Ninth Avenue and 
running southerly and by other various courses to its end. 



The said land to be taken contains approximately 
37.2 acres and is to be held, managed and controlled 
by the Conservation Commission for the promotion and 
development of the natural resources and for the pro- 
tection of the watershed resources of said town; and, 
further, for the purpose of acquiring said land and for 
the purpose of paying, in whole or in part, any damages 
for which the town may be liable by reason of the taking 
of said land by eminent domain, to see if the Town will 
vote to raise and appropriate the sum of One Hundred 
Three Thousand Eight Hundred ($103,800) Dollars and 
to authorize the Selectmen to expend the sum of One 
Hundred Five Thousand ($105,000) Dollars from the 
Conservation Fund, or act in relation thereto. 

Conservation Commission 

ARTICLE 10. To see if the Town will vote; to delib- 
erate, act and vote on the 1976/1977 School Department 
budget, as described on pages 28 and 29 of Article 3 
of the warrant of the May 3, 1976, Town of Chelmsford 
Annual Town Meeting and as amended at that Town 
Meeting (Line Item 189, changed from $42,000 to 
$26,000), and as may be amended further by action 
under this article; or act in relation thereto. 

Petition 

And you are hereby directed to serve this Warrant 
by posting attested copies thereof at the McFarlin 
School-All Purpose Room, North Elementary School 
Auditorium, Colonel Moses Parker Junior High School 
Band Room, East Chelmsford School, Byam School 
Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, North Ele- 
mentary School Audtorium, Small Gymnasium, C. Edith 
McCarthy Junior High School, South Row School 
Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, Westlands 
School Cafeteria, and Fire House-Old Westford Road 
seven days at least before the time appointed for holding 
this meeting aforesaid. 

Hereof fail not and make return of the Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the 
time and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 14th day of May, 1976, 
A.D. 

S/PaulC. Hart, Chairman 
S/Philip L. Currier, Vice Chairman 
S/Thomas A. Palmer, Jr., Clerk 
S/ArnoldJ. Lovering 
S/William R. Murphy 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 



MIDDLESEX, SS. 



May, 1976 



Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified 
and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School- All Purpose Room, North 
Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room, East Chelmsford School, 
Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Small Gym- 
nasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, South 
Row School Auditorium, South Row School Auditorium, 



36 



Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire House-Old West- 
ford Road seven days at least before the time appointed 
for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S' William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 
5/17/76 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
May 24, 1976 

The adjourned Annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:45 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr., who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 508 voters present. The following tellers were 
appointed: 



Ina Greenblatt 
Ruth Delaney 
Marguerite Waldron 



Edward Hilliard 
Paul Bienvenu 
Richard Burtt 



Mrs. Mary Guaraldi presented the beautiful Bi-Cen- 
tenniel quilt made by the ladies of the Bi-Centennial 
Commission to the Town of Chelmsford. Selectman 
Paul Hart accepted the gift on behalf of the Towns- 
people. 

UNDER ARTICLE 33 . Mr. Denis Valdinocci moved 
that the Town vote to adopt a by-law entitled, "Pro- 
cedure for Conducting Referenda in the Town of 
Chelmsford", to read as follows: 

Upon approval of a majority of those voting at the 
Annual or a Special Town Meeting of Chelmsford, 
a question may be placed on the ballot for the next 
Annual or Special Town election, as a referendum. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 34. Mr. Denis Valdinocci moved 
that the Town vote to adopt a By-Law establishing 
criteria for conflicts of interest by Town Officers, em- 
ployees and appointed members of Town Committees: 
said by-law to read as follows: 

All town officials shall perform the duties and 
responsibilities of their office in a manner fully consis- 
tent with the code of ethics established by General Law 
under Chapter 268A, Conduct of Public Employees. 

No Town Official may exercise his vote on any Town 
Agency or participate in the deliberations of that agency 
if said vote or participation would directly affect the 
income of a) that Town Official, b) any member of 
the Official's family, or c) a business associate of the 
Town Official. 

Any alleged violation to this by-law, when brought 
to the attention of the appointing authority, shall 
mandate a hearing and if cause found, lawful measures 
will be taken by the appointing authority to remove 
the violator from office. The actions of the violator 
in public office which were found to be in violation 
of this by-law shall be declared null and void. 

Upon conviction of a violation of this by-law by the 
judicial system, the violator shall be assessed a penalty 
of twice the economic advantage or $500 whichever is 
greater. 



Town Counsel recommended passage of this article 
to challenge legality of bv-law. 

A vote was taken on main motion. Motion passed. 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 

May 24, 1976 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
8:05 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr., who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. Selectman Paul 
Hart moved we waive the reading of the entire warrant 
and the Sheriffs return of service. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer from the Reserve Fund 
the amount of $68,799 to the following-named accounts 
in the Police Department: 



1 . Officers and Administration 

2. Regular & Substitute Account 

3. Maintenance & Equipment 

It was so voted. 



$ 9,598.00 

57,926.00 

1,275.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 2. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer from the Reserve Fund 
the amount of $1,201, and transfer from available funds 
the amount of $73,611 to the following- named accounts 
in the Fire Department: 



1 . Officers and Administration 

2. Regular & Substitute Account 

3. Maintenance & Equipment 

It was so voted. 



$ 8,742.00 

64,695.00 

1,375.00 



UNDER ARTICLE 3. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 



the Town vote to transfer from available funds the 
sum of $49,979 for Chapter 90 construction. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Selectman Paul Hart moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from available funds $19,279 
for Chapter 90 construction. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5 . Selectman Paul Hart moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
expend funds in the amount of $160,989 for various 
projects in accordance with provisions of Chapter 825, 
Section 1 , Acts of 1974. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Chairman of the Planning Board, 
Robert Raab moved that the Town vote to petition the 
Great and General Court of the Commonwealth of 
Massachusetts for the enactment of a special act entitled 
"An Act establishing terms of office for members of the 
Planning Board of the Town of Chelmsford", said act 
being as follows: 

Notwithstanding the provisions of section eighty-one A 
of chapter forty-one of the General Laws or any other 



37 



general or special law to the contrary, the members 
of the planning board of the Town of Chelmsford shall 
be elected for terms of three years each, except that at 
the annual town election to be held in 1977, one member 
shall be elected for a term of four years: thereafter 
in subsequent years all members shall be elected for terms 
of three years each. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Mr. Robert Raab moved that the 
Town vote to waive the requirement, voted at the 
Adjourned Annual Town Meeting of May 19, 1975, that 
Article 3, Line 157 Consultant, shall be used only as 
Chelmsford's participation in the Comprehensive Plan- 
ning and Management Program, Section 701, of the 
U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. 

This article was recommended by the Finance Com- 
mittee. After discussion a vote was taken on the motion. 
It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 8. Mr. Matthew Doyle moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $3,800.00 to be expended by the School Committee 
on the Swim Team. 

Town Counsel Clement McCarthy stated this article 
is illegal. The Finance Committee was opposed to it, 
and Mr. Reynolds stated the School Committee are also 
opposed to it, since other cuts had to be made in the 
school budget. After further discussion Mr. Walter 
Ahern made a motion to stop debate. A 2/3 vote 
required. 



YES 



368 



NO 



Motion carried. 



A voice vote was taken on the main motion. Motion 
defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 9. Mr. Donald House moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
acquire in fee simple by eminent domain for conserva- 
tion purposes in accordance with Massachusetts General 
Laws, Ch. 132 A, Section 11, Ch. 40, Section 8C and 
Ch. 79, the following described land with the trees and 
structures thereon: 

The land in Chelmsford, Middlesex County, Massa- 
chusetts bounded as follows: Commencing at a point 
at land of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts and 
known as Route 3, and the southwesterly corner of land 
now or formerly of Edward Brule, Jr. also known as 
Edouard Brule, Jr. which land is shown on the Assessors' 
Maps of the Town of Chelmsford as Plat 61, Lot 71P, 
and is described in a deed recorded in the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1554, Page 
54: thence running northerly along the westerly line of 
said Brule land to a point at other land of said Brule 
shown on said Assessors' Maps as Plat 63, Lot 42, and 
described in said deed: thence westerly along said last 
described Brule land to a point on the southerly side 
of Thirteenth Avenue: thence westerly along the souther- 
ly side of Thirteenth Avenue to a point on the easterly 
side of Twiss Road: thence northerly along the easterly 
side of Twiss Road to a point at the southerly corner of 
Fairview Cemetery and the northwesterly side of Need- 
ham Street: thence northeasterly along the northwesterly 
side of Needham Street and the southeasterly side of 



Fairview Cemetery to a point at the northeasterly corner 
of Fairview Cemetery and the southeasterly corner of 
land now or formerly of James J. and Carol G. Femia: 
thence southeasterly at a right angle to a point on the 
southeasterly side of Needham Street: thence north- 
easterly along the southeasterly side of Needham Street 
to a point on the southerly side of Ninth Avenue: thence 
easterly along the southerly side of Ninth Avenue to a 
point on the easterly side of Willis Drive: thence norther- 
ly and easterly along Willis Drive in various courses to 
a point on the southerly side of Willis Drive which 
point is the northeasterly corner on Willis Drive of that 
parcel of land conveyed to Thomas Quinn Co., Inc. 
by deed of Anella A. Crockett dated June 2, 1966, and 
recorded in Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds 
at Book 1753, Page 451 shown as Parcel Three in said 
deed: thence southerly along the said land of Thomas 
Quinn Co., Inc. to Crystal Lake, also known as New- 
field Pond: thence westerly and by other various courses 
along the shore of the southwesterly portion of Crystal 
Lake, also known as Newfield Pond, at elevation 121.0 
to a point at land of the Commonwealth of Massa- 
chusetts and known as Route 3: thence westerly, south- 
westerly and westerly along said Route 3 to the point 
of beginning. 

Included within the above taking is the fee in all 
abutting streets and ways insofar as the same may be 
held, owned or possessed by the owners from whom land 
is taken hereby, including but not limited to the entirety 
of Tenth, Eleventh, Twelfth, Thirteenth and Fourteenth 
Avenues, Marion and Florence Roads and Murphy 
Street and that portion of Willis Drive commencing at 
the southerly line of Ninth Avenue and running southerly 
and by other various courses to its end. 

The said land to be taken contains approximately 38.2 
acres and is to be held, managed and controlled by the 
Conservation Commission for the promotion and devel- 
opment of the natural resources and for the protection 
of the watershed resources of said town: and, further, 
for the purpose of acquiring said land and for the 
purpose of paying, in whole or in part, any damages 
for which the town may be liable by reason of the taking 
of said land by eminent domain, I move that the Town 
will vote to transfer the sum of One Hundred Three 
Thousand Eight Hundred ($103,800) Dollars and to 
authorize the Selectmen to expend the sum of One 
Hundred Five Thousand ($105,000) Dollars from the 
Conservation Fund, or act in relation thereto. 

Mr. McCormack of the Conservation Commission 
presented the reasons for acquiring this area. The 
Finance Committee supported the article. A lengthy 
discussion followed. Mr. Alex Weir made a motion to 
amend as follows: 

It is proposed that the persons owning year-round 
residences in the proposed tract be excluded from the 
taking by eminent domain and shall be entitled to such 
access to their property as is now available. 

The discussion about this amendment resulted in a 
motion by John Alden to stop debate. It was so voted, 
unanimously. The debate on the main motion continued. 
Mr. Leslie Adams moved to stop debate on the main 
motion. 



38 



The Moderator attempted to get a unanimous voice 
vote two times, unsuccessfully. A hand count was taken: 

YES 267 NO 2 

Motion to stop debate carried. 

A vote was taken on the main motion. A 2/3 vote was 
required. The voice vote left Chair in doubt. A hand 
count was taken. 



YES 



97 



NO 245 



Motion defeated. 



Mr. Terry McSheehy moved for reconsideration. 
Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 10 . Mr. Arthur Van der Heilde 
moved that the Town vote to rescind and reconsider and 
vote on the 1976/1977 School Department budget, as 
described on Pages 28 and 29 of Article 3 of the warrant 
of the May 3, 1976, Town of Chelmsford Annual Town 
Meeting and as amended at that Town Meeting (Line 
Item 189, changed from $42,000 to $26,000), and as may 
be amended further by action under this article. 

Town Counsel Clement McCarthy ruled that this 
article is illegal. A debate followed which resulted in 
a motion by Mr. Gordon Reed to stop debate. It was 
so voted, unanimously. A vote was taken on the main 
motion. Motion defeated. 

The special town meeting was adjourned at 10:40 P.M. 
sine die on motion of Selectman Paul Hart. It was so 
voted. 

The regular Town Meeting continued. 

UNDER ARTICLE 35 . Chairman of the Water District 
Consolidation Committee, Jo Anne Kelch, moved that 
the Town vote to form a single, town-wide water district 
for the Town of Chelmsford. A discussion on consoli- 
dation took place. The Finance Committee supported 
article: the Board of Selectmen opposed it. Mr. Karl 
Chambers questioned the presence of a quorum. There 
were 218 voters present. A vote was taken on the main 
motion. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 36. Mrs. Jo Anne Kelch moved to 
dismiss this article. It was so voted. 

Mr. Terry McSheehy moved to adjourn at 11:10 P.M. 
until Wednesday, June 2, 1976, at 7:30 P.M. Mr. Paul 
Hart moved to amend to hold meeting at the McCarthy 
Jr. High School Gymnasium. It was so voted. 

Daniel J. Coughlin 
Moderator 



Moderator to conduct the remainder of Town Meeting. 
Selectman Paul Hart nominated James Harrington - 
there were no other nominations. 

Attorney James Harrington was sworn in by Town 
Clerk Mary St. Hilaire. 



The following tellers were appointed: 

Dorothy Lerer 
Margaret Johnson 



Christos Alexion 
Edward Hilliard 



Mr. Reginald Larkin moved that we take Article 58 
out of sequence. This motion was opposed by Mr. 
Richard Sullivan of the Finance Committee and by 
Selectman Arnold Lovering. A vote was taken on Mr. 
Larkin's motion. Motion defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 37. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town vote 
to transfer $87,000 for aerial mapping of the entire town. 

The Finance Committee supported this article. Select- 
man Arnold Lovering gave a detailed explanation of the 
purpose of mapping the Town. 

Mr. Reginald Larkin questioned the quorum. There 
were 135 voters present. Two hundred voters are required 
for a quorum. Selectman Paul Hart moved for adjourn- 
ment at 8:20 P.M. until Tuesday, June 8, 1976, at 
7:30 P.M. in the McCarthy Junior High School Audi- 
torium. 

James Harrington 
Temporary Moderator 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 

ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
June 8, 1976 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 7:50 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, 
Jr. who recognized the presence of a quorum. There 
were 390 voters present. 

The following tellers were appointed: 

Carl Olsson Ina Greenblatt 

Richard Burtt James Harrington 

Karen Flynn Ruth Delaney 

UNDER ARTICLE 37. Chairman of the Board of 
Selectmen, Paul C. Hart, moved that the Town vote 
to transfer from Free Cash $87,000 for aerial mapping 
of the entire town. 



Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 



ADJOURNED ANNUAL TOWN MEETING 
June 2, 1976 

The adjourned annual Town Meeting was called to 
order at 8:05 P.M. by Town Clerk Mary E. St. Hilaire, 
who announced that since the Moderator Daniel J. 
Coughlin, Jr. is confined to St. Joseph's Hospital, 
nominations are in order to appoint a temporary 



Selectman Arnold Lovering gave a detailed explana- 
tion of the need for aerial mapping. The article was 
supported by the Board of Selectmen and the Finance 
Committee. After a discussion a voice vote was taken 
which was questioned by the Moderator. A hand vote 
was taken. Motion passed - Mrs. Larkin questioned the 
decision of the Moderator. A hand count was taken: 



YES 154 



NO 132 



It was so voted. 



UNDER ARTICLE 38. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer from free cash $2,000.00 



39 



to have the property lines and topographical surveys 
at the East and Qjaessy Schools for recording purposes. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of this article. 
It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 39. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to raise and appropriate the sum 
of $32,000.02, and transfer from free cash $22,660.00 
for the construction of sidewalks in accordance with 
plans and specifications prepared by the Middlesex 
County Engineers at the following locations: 

North Road from McCarthy Junior High to Dalton Road: 
Groton Road from Vinal Square to entrance of North 
School: 

The Board of Selectmen supported this article. The 
Finance Committee also supported article. Mr. Richard 
Sullivan stated that the state will not be as liberal with 
funds as in the past. Mr. William Reynolds of the 
School Committee stated there has been an audit by the 
state and that there will be a cutback of funds next 
year. Sidewalks must be built so that students who live 
1 1/2 miles from a school can walk safely. After a dis- 
cussion a vote was taken on the motion. Motion passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 40. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to approve the following By-Law: 

"The Board of Selectmen shall from time to time 
review and establish mileage compensation for Town em- 
ployees under their jurisdiction." 

The Selectmen supported this article. The Finance 
Committee also supported it. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 41. Park Commissioner, Ralph E. 
House, moved that the Town vote to raise and appro- 
priate $6,081.75 to purchase a 1976 tractor with attach- 
ments and to sell by good and sufficient bill of sale one 
Rogers Litter Lift. 

The Finance Committee supported this article. It was 
so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 42. Selectman Paul C. Hart and 
William R. Murphy who is also Chairman of the Van- 
dalism Committee moved that the Town vote to adopt 
the following By-Law: 

"The use of School grounds is prohibited for the 
following activities except when posted* otherwise: 

(a) Horseback riding 

*(b) Motor cycles and mini bikes 

*(c) Snow mobiles 

(d) Camping 

(e) Automobile related activities 

(f) Golfing 

(g) Model airplane activities 

*By-Law - Such activities are automatically prohibited 
unless signs granting approval are posted on the grounds. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 43. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to amend Section One - Permit of 
the STREETS and SIDEWALKS By-Law of the Town 
by adding immediately after the words, "Board of 
Selectmen", the phrase "or its designee". 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 44. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
for dismissal of this article. The Finance Committee 
were also in favor of dismissal. The state has given the 
Town authority to ban parking on either side of Pond 
Street from June 15 to September 15 so it is not 
necessary to have a town by-law to this effect. 

Motion for dismissal passed, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 45. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to accept Section 6C (Removal of 
ice and snow from private ways: conditions) and Section 
6G (Private ways: temporary resurfacing: conditions.) 
of Chapter 40 of the Massachusetts General Laws. 

Selectman William Murphy stated this article would 
give authorization for plowing streets which are not 
accepted, and stated the selectmen recommend article. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 46. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town raise and appropriate the sum of 
$17,500.00 to publish the Town History covering the 
period from 1915-1970: proceeds from the sale of said 
histories to be turned into the Town Treasury. 

The Selectmen and Finance Committee opposed this 
article. 

Motion defeated, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote under Article 47 to rescind the 
present Town By-Law pertaining to Annual Town 
Meetings and Elections and substituting therefor, the 
following: 

ANNUAL TOWN MEETING (ELECTION) 

The Annual Election shall be held on the first 
Saturday of April and the Annual Town Meeting shall 
be held on the last Monday of the same month. 
Selectman William Murphy and Richard Sullivan of the 
Finance Committee supported the article as it as pre- 
sented. 

It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 47a. Mr. Paul Hart moved for dis- 
missal of Article 47a. 

It was so voted. Article dismissed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 48. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the sum of $2,732.21 from 
the Sinking Fund to reimburse the Town for expenses 
incurred for damage at the MacKay Library, Cemetery 
Department, Town Hall, and Varney Playground. 



The Finance Committee recommended this 
It was so voted, unanimously. 



article. 



40 



UNDER ARTICLE 49. Selectmen Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer the unexpended balances 
of the following completed school construction accounts 
to the construction account of the new 1972 High School: 



Old High School 
Old High School 
South Row School 
Westlands School 



$ 22.13 

6,293.91 

25,588.15 

20,959.63 

$52,863.82 



Purpose: To use available funds in order to decrease 
the amount of borrowing to complete the 1972 High 
School. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of this article. 
Motion passed, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 50. Selectman Paul Hart moved 
that the Town vote to petition the General Court of the 
Commonwealth of Massachusetts to place the following 
non-binding referendum question on the ballot of the 
next annual town election. 

"Should the Board of Selectmen initiate action either 
through a charter petition drive or a special act of the 
legislature to be approved by Town Meeting prior to its 
submission to secure full-time professional management 
for the Town?" 

The Selectmen and Home Rule Advisory Committee 
supported this article. After a discussion a vote was taken 
on the main motion. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 51. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to adopt the following: 

Be it resolved that the Town of Chelmsford asks its 
representatives in the Great and General Court to support 
and/or file fiscal responsibility legislation which would 
require a two-thirds vote of both houses or a local 
acceptance option on any legislation which, due to the 
lack of State funding, passes the cost down to the local 
government. 

The Selectmen and Finance Committee recommended 
this article. A vote was taken on the main motion. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 52. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to adopt the following: 

The Board of Selectmen will present on a yearly 
basis to the Annual Meeting a five-year Capital Im- 
provement Plan so that the voters may be aware of the 
projected capital expenses and may provide direction 
to the elected official. 

It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 53. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to adopt the following: 

To allow the Highway Department to enter upon pri- 
vate property for the maintenance of streams. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of this article. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 



UNDER ARTICLE 54. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to convey to Mr. & Mrs. Maurice Camire all right, title 
and interest, if any, held by the Town in the following 
two parcels of land, for consideration to be determined: 

Parcel I. Lot 14, Block 23, Assessors' Map 67, con- 
sisting of 3300 square feet of land more or less and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Seventh Avenue, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from Isabella 
N. Hazlett by instrument recorded at the Middlesex 
North District Registry of Deeds in Book 1674, Page 162. 

Parcel II. Lot 12, Block 23, Assessors' Map 67, con- 
sisting of 3300 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Seventh Avenue, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from James 
W. Hazlett by instrument recorded at said Registry in 
Book 1674, Page 163. 

For title reference see Treasurer's deed to the Town 
of Chelmsford, dated June 10, 1975, and recorded in 
said Registry at Book 2153, Page 300. 

Selectman Paul Hart, Attorney Frederick Finnegan, 
and Finance Committee Member Richard Sullivan spoke 
in favor of this article. 

A 2/3 vote required. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 55. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to convey to Michael Jamgochian all right, title and 
interest, if any, held by the Town in the following three 
parcels of land, for consideration to be determined: 

Parcel I. Lot 15, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, con- 
sisting of 5,000 square feet, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Dover Street, which 
was taken for non-payment of taxes from David E. 
England and Gladys N. England by instrument recorded 
at the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in 
Book 1620, Page 91. 

For title reference see Treasurer's deed to the Town of 
Chelmsford, dated June 10, 1975, and recorded in said 
Registry at Book 2153, Page 300. 

Parcel II. Lot 10D, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, con- 
sisting of 3662 square feet of land, more or less, and 
the buildings thereon, if any, located on Shore Drive, 
which was taken for non-payment of taxes from Frank 
Austin Riexinger by instrument recorded at said Registry 
in Book 1396, Page 171. Also see Land Court Notice 
of Disposal in Tax Lien Case recorded in Book 1741, 
Page 565. 

Parcel III. Lot 18, Block 16, Assessors' Map 45, con- 
sisting of 6750 square feet of land, more or less, and the 
buildings thereon, if any, located on Dover Street, which 
was taken for non-payment of taxes from Thomas F. 
Reilly by instrument recorded at said Registry in Book 
1362, Page 374. Also see Final Decree in Tax Lien 
Case and Notice of Disposal in Tax Lien Case, both 
issued by the Land Court and recorded in said Deeds 
at Book 1456, Page 240. 

The Selectmen and Finance Committee were in favor 
of this article. A voice vote was attempted twice. Mr. 



41 



John Alden's motion to dismiss was declared out of order 
by the Moderator. A hand count was taken: YES 195 
NO 72 2/3 vote required. It was so voted. 

UNDER ARTICLE 56. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen 
to convey to Kevin Ferreira all right, title and interest, 
if any, held by the Town in the following two parcels 
of land, for consideration to be determined: 

Parcel I . Lot 39, Block 34, Assessors' Map 114, con- 
sisting of 2500 square feet of land, more or less, and 
the buildings thereon, if any, located on Lexington 
Street, which was conveyed by Karlene G. MacKissock 
to the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by quit- 
claim deed, dated November 1, 1961, and recorded at 
the Middlesex North District Registry of Deeds in Book 
1537, Page 493, in accordance with a vote under Article 
48 at the Annual Town Meeting of the Town of 
Chelmsford on March 13, 1961. 

Parcel II . Lot 40, Block 34, Assessors' Map 114, Con- 
sisting of 2500 square feet of land, more or less, and 
the buildings thereon, if any, located on Lexington 
Street, which was conveyed by Raymond T. Osborn to 
the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by quitclaim 
deed, dated November 21, 1961, and recorded at said 
Registry in Book 1540, Page 41, in accordance with a 
vote under Article 48 at the Annual Town Meeting of 
the Town of Chelmsford on March 13, 1961. 

The Finance Committee was in favor of this article. 
After a brief discussion a vote was taken. Two-thirds 
vote required for passage. It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 57. Selectman Paul C. Hart moved 
that the Town vote to transfer $26,315.00 from free 
cash to the 1972 High School Account. 

The Finance Committee recommended this article. 
It was so voted, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 58. Chairman of the Finance Com- 
mittee, Marvin Schenk, moved that the Town vote to 
instruct the Board of Assessors to issue $878,083.00 from 
free cash in the Treasury for the reduction of the tax 
rate for the current fiscal period. 

The Finance Committee recommended article. It was 
so voted, unanimously. 

Selectman Paul Hart moved for adjournment sine die 
at 9:30 P.M. 



Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. 
Moderator 

Mary E. St. Hilaire 
Town Clerk 

Total Budget 
Article Approp. 
R & A Total 

Transfers 

Regular 

Special 



$19,438,694.47 

804,223.33 

20,242,917.80 

$1,647,082.16 

1,434,213.16 

212,869.00 



TOWN WARRAN FOR STATE PRIMARY 
September 14, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling places, 
viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School- All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 

School Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 
i Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House- Old Westford Road 

On Tuesday, the 14th day of September, 1976, being 
the second Tuesday in said month, at 8:00 A.M. to 
8:00 P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Primary Officers for 
the nomination of candidates for political parties for 
the following offices: 



United States Senator 
Representative in Congress 
Councillor 
Senator 



for this Commonwealth 

5th Congressional District 

3rd Councillor District 

5th Senatorial District 



Representative in General Court 43rd Representative 

District 
Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 and 12 Only 
Representative in General Court 45th Representative 

District 
Precincts 2 and 7 Only 
Representative in General Court 47th Representative 

District 

Precincts 4 and 11 Only 

Clerk of Courts for Middlesex County 

Register of Deeds for Northern District 

County Commissioners (2) for Middlesex County 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

And you are directed to serve this Warrant by posting 
attested copies thereof at McFarlin School-All Purpose 
Room; North Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel 
Moses Parker Junior High School Band Room; East 
Chelmsford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands 
School Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; 
Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High 
School; South Row School Auditorium; South Row 
School Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; and 
Fire House-Old Westford Road at least seven days 
before the time appointed for holding the meeting 
aforesaid. 



12 



Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the tiem 
and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 24th day of August, 1976. 

S/Paul C. Hart, Chairman 
S/Philip L. Currier, Vice Chairman 
S/Thomas A. Palmer, Jr., Clerk 
S/William R. Murphy 
S/ArnoldJ. Lovering 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. Sept. 3, 1976 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified and 
warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford by 



posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School- All Purpose Room; North 
Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses Parker 
Junior High School Band Room; East Chelmsford 
School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 

Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House- 
Old Westford Road, seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, Attest: 

S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



REPUBLICAN STATE PRIMARY 

Sept. 14, 1976 



U.S. SENATE 
Michael S. Robertson 
Blanks 

TOTAL 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 



1 



54 
7 



61 



25 
10 



35 



39 

10 



49 



16 
2 



18 



5 
46 



54 



33 
3 



7 
32 



Prec. Prec. 
8 9 



36 
5 



Prec. 
10 



39 
6 



36 



40 



41 



21 



45 



Prec. Prec. Total 
11 12 



50 
3 



53 



25 
4 



410 
72 



29 482 



CONGRESSMAN 5th DISTRICT 
Roger P. Durkin 57 29 

Blanks 4 6 



TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Di > * < 

Write-in 

Blanks 



TOTAL 



61 



35 



35 
14 



47 
7 



33 
3 



34 
6 



32 
9 



40 
5 



49 



54 



36 



40 



41 



21 



45 



50 
3 



53 



27 
2 



29 



418 
64 



61 


35 


49 


18 


54 


36 


40 


41 


21 


45 


53 


29 


482 


-ict 
3 





2 


1 

















3 








9 


58 


35 


47 


17 


54 


36 


40 


41 


21 


42 


53 


29 


473 



482 



SENATOR 5th Middlesex District 
Ronald C. MacKenzie 46 23 
Blanks 15 12 



TOTAL 



61 



35 



41 



4 


44 


31 


31 


30 


15 


34 


47 


25 


381 


4 


10 


5 


9 


11 


6 


11 


6 


4 


101 



49 



If 



54 



36 



40 



41 



21 



45 



53 



29 



482 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 43rd Middlesex District 
Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 only 

Bruce N. Freeman 61 44 49 34 

Blanks 5 5 2 



40 
1 



44 
1 



27 
2 



318 
18 



TOTAL 



61 



49 



54 



36 



41 



21 



45 



29 



336 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 45th Middlesex District 

Precincts 2 & 7 only 

Blanks 35 40 



TOTAL 



35 



40 



75 
75 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 47th Middlesex District 

Precincts 4 & 1 1 only 

Write-In 1 

Blanks 17 





53 



1 
70 



TOTAL 



53 



43 



CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 

Joan R. Needleman 

Blanks 



TOTAL 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern District 



55 


20 


36 


14 


45 


31 


34 


30 


17 


6 


15 


13 


4 


9 


5 


6 


11 


4 


61 


35 


49 


18 


54 


36 


40 


41 


21 



37 



52 
1 



45 



53 



DEMOCRATIC STATE PRIMARY 

Sept. 14, 1976 



24 
5 



29 



395 

87 



482 



Write-In 
Blanks 


4 
56 


1 
34 


1 
48 


1 

17 




54 


1 

35 


4 
36 



41 



21 



45 



53 


2 

27 


15 

467 


TOTAL 


61 


35 


49 


18 


54 


36 


40 


41 


21 


45 


53 


29 


482 


COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County (2) 
CarlJ. Cincotta 50 20 35 12 
Write-In 2 1 
Blanks 70 50 63 23 


40 



68 


27 



45 


29 



51 


30 



52 


14 



28 


34 

1 

55 


48 



58 


26 



32 


365 

4 

595 


TOTAL 


122 


70 


98 


36 


108 


72 


80 


82 


42 


90 


106 


58 


964 



U.S. SENATE 






Edward M. Kennedy 


138 


123 


Robert E. Dinsmore 


24 


19 


Frederick C. Langone 


19 


7 


Bernard P. Shannon 


4 


3 


Blanks 





4 



TOTAL 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 



156 109 122 142 84 

34 24 24 29 21 

19 14 24 8 13 

2 4 5 2 

4 5 13 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Total 
8 9 10 11 12 



75 


99 


150 


138 


139 


1475 


15 


24 


44 


20 


45 


323 


9 


12 


11 


17 


14 


167 


4 


2 


9 


3 


1 


39 


2 


1 


1 


3 


2 


26 



185 156 213 154 175 187 120 



105 



138 215 181 201 2030 



CONGRESSMAN 5th District 

Paul E. Tsongas 

Write-in 

Blanks 



TOTAL 

COUNCILLOR 3rd Di 
Herbert L. Connolly 
Blanks 



150 

1 

34 


127 



29 


171 
1 

41 


120 



34 


146 



29 


154 

1 

32 


104 


16 


81 



24 


117 



21 


171 


44 


150 


31 


164 


37 


1655 

3 

372 


185 


156 


213 


154 


175 


187 


120 


105 


138 


215 


181 


201 


2030 


ict 
127 

58 


104 
52 


137 
76 


106 
48 


121 



134 
53 


95 
25 


67 
38 


90 
48 


139 

76 


127 
54 


124 

77 


1371 
659 



TOTAL 



185 



156 213 154 175 187 120 



105 



138 215 181 201 2030 



SENATOR 5th Middlesex District 
John J. Leary 125 112 

Write-In 

Blanks 60 44 



TOTAL 



139 115 125 142 100 70 



74 39 50 45 20 35 



99 140 138 128 1433 

10 1 

39 75 42 73 596 



185 156 213 154 175 187 120 105 11 



215 181 201 2030 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 43rd Middlesex District 

Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 only 

Write-in 6 8 3 

Blanks 179 205 172 187 



TOTAL 



185 



213 



175 187 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 45th Middlesex District 
Precincts 2 & 7 only 

Philip L. Shea 118 99 

Blanks 38 21 



TOTAL 



156 



120 



44 



05 


138 


4 
211 


8 
193 


29 
1390 


05 


138 


215 


201 


1419 

217 
59 



276 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 47th Middlesex District 

Precincts 4 & 1 1 only 

Edward A. LeLacheur 122 

Write-in 

Blanks 32 



148 

2 

31 



270 



63 



TOTAL 



154 



181 



335 



CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 
Edward J. Sullivan 138 117 139 

Blanks 47 39 74 



120 


125 


145 


96 


70 


98 


114 


139 


124 


1455 


34 


50 


42 


24 


35 


40 


71 


42 


77 


575 



TOTAL 



185 156 213 154 175 187 



120 



105 



138 215 181 201 2030 



REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern District 

EdwardJ. Early Jr. 86 92 101 86 80 

WalterJ. Flynn 81 56 85 65 82 

Blanks 18 8 27 3 13 



97 


69 


64 


51 


87 


92 


93 


998 


76 


43 


36 


76 


111 


78 


91 


830 


14 


8 


5 


11 


17 


11 


17 


152 



TOTAL 



185 156 213 154 175 187 120 



105 138 215 181 201 2030 



COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County (2) 

Michael E. McLaughlin 

S. Lester Ralph 

Joyce Morrissey Beatty 

Richard Robert Caples 

Thomas F. Coughlin 

Bernard J. Hennessy 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



92 


109 


112 


109 


99 


113 


81 


51 


72 


131 


114 


90 


1173 


71 


42 


89 


44 


59 


74 


33 


46 


56 


71 


54 


75 


714 


22 


25 


34 


15 


28 


32 


21 


13 


29 


37 


27 


41 


324 


25 


14 


17 


12 


22 


23 


13 


15 


14 


21 


24 


29 


229 


49 


57 


58 


49 


48 


43 


35 


30 


40 


71 


50 


54 


584 


29 


22 


33 


16 


29 


23 


21 


17 


18 


29 


17 


45 


299 


82 


43 


83 


63 


65 


66 


36 


38 


47 


70 


76 


68 


737 



370 312 426 308 350 374 240 



210 276 430 362 402 4060 



AMERICAN PARTY STATE PRIMARY 
Sept. 14, 1976 



Prec. Prec. 
1 2 
U.S. SENATE 
Blanks 


Prec. 

3 




Prec. 
4 




Prec. Prec. 
5 6 






Prec. 

7 




Prec. 

8 




Prec. 

9 




Prec. 
10 




Prec. 
11 




Prec. 

12 




Total 



TOTAL 








































CONGRESSMAN 5th District 
Blanks 








































TOTAL 








































COUNCILLOR 3rd District 
Blanks 








































TOTAL 








































SENATOR 5th Middlesex District 
Blanks 





































TOTAL 








































REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 43rd Middlesex 

Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 only 

Blanks 


District 





















TOTAL 








































REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 45th Middlesex 

Precincts 2 & 7 only 

Blanks 


District 





















TOTAL 












45 





























REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 47th Middlesex District 
Precincts 4 & 11 only 



Blanks 
































TOTAL 
































CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 
Blanks 
































TOTAL 
































REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern District 
Blanks 


























• 


TOTAL 
































COUNTY COMMISSIONER Middlesex County (2) 
Blanks ( 





























TOTAL 

































TOWN WARRANT FOR STATE ELECTION 

November 2, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in their several polling 
places, viz: 

Precinct 1 . McFarlin School- All Purpose Room 

Precinct 2. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 3. Colonel Moses Parker Junior High 

School Band Room 

Precinct 4. East Chelmsford School 

Precinct 5. Byam School Cafetorium 

Precinct 6. Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 7. North Elementary School Auditorium 

Precinct 8. Small Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy 

Junior High School 

Precinct 9. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 10. South Row School Auditorium 

Precinct 1 1 . Westlands School Cafeteria 

Precinct 12. Fire House-Old Westford Road 

On Tuesday, the 2nd day of November, 1976, being 
the first Tuesday in said month, at 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 
P.M. for the following purposes: 

To bring in their votes to the Election Officers for 
the election of candidates for the following offices: 



President, Vice President 

Senator in Congress 
Congressman 

Councillor 



of the United States 

of America 

for this Commonwealth 

for 5th Congressional 

District 

for 3rd Councillor 

District 



Senator in General Court for 5th Middlesex 

Senatorial District 
Representative in General 
Court 43rd Representative District 

Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10 and 12 Only 
Representative in General 
Court 45th Representative District 

Precincts 2 and 7 Only 
Representative in General 
Court 47th Representative District 

Precincts 4 and 11 Only 
Clerk of Courts for Middlesex County 

Register of Deeds for Northern District 

County Commissioners (2) for Middlesex County 

And to vote upon the following questions: 

Question No. 1. Proposed Amendment to Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment 
to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the 
House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973, 
by a vote of 261-0, and on May 14, 1975, by a vote 
of217-55? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 



The proposed amendment would provide that equality 
under the law may not be denied or abridged on the basis 
of sex, race, color, creed or national origin. This amend- 
ment adds one sentence to Article 1 of Part the First of 
the Constitution which now contains a general statement 
of individual rights, including the right to enjoy and 
defend life and liberty and the right to acquire and pro- 
tect property. 

Question No. 2. Proposed Amendment to Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment 
to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the 



46 



House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973, 
by a voe of 199-66, and on May 7, 1975, by a vote of 
228-41? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 



The proposed amendment would authorize the Legis- 
lature to substitute for the present system of flat or 
uniform personal income tax rates a system of rates 
graduated according to the total amount of income 
received. The Legislature would also be authorized to 
provide for reasonable exemptions, deductions, credits, 
and abatements and could base Massachusetts income 
tax provisions on provisions of Federal income tax law. 

Question No. 3. Proposed Amendment to Constitution 

Do you approve of the adoption of an amendment 
to the Constitution summarized below, which was 
approved by the General Court in joint sessions of the 
House of Representatives and Senate on August 15, 1973, 
by a vote of 259-0, and on May 12, 1976, by a vote 
of 262-1? 



Summary 



YES 
NO 



The proposed amendment would authorize the Legis- 
lature to provide for absentee voting by persons who hold 
religious beliefs in conflict with the act of voting on the 
day on which any election is to be held. 

Question No. 4. Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which 
was disapproved by the House of Representatives on 
May 5, 1975, by a vote of 179-46, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 7, 1975? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 



Section 1 of the act inserts a new chapter 164B into 
the General Laws and establishes a Massachusetts Power 
Authority, a body corporate and politic with seven mem- 
bers appointed by the Governor to staggered six year 
terms. The Authority is to establish and operate a bulk 
power supply system to supply wholesale electric power 
to utilities throughout the Commonwealth. The primary 
purpose of the Authority is to supply the Commonwealth 
with power with the minimum adverse impact on the 
environment. The Authority is also authorized to engage 
in research and development of new sources of power, 
new siting techniques, and methods of environmental 
protection. 

In carrying out its responsibilities, the Authority is 
authorized to adopt by-laws; adopt an official seal; main- 
tain offices; sue and be sued; construct or acquire 
facilities either within or without the Commonwealth; 
issue revenue bonds and borrow money in anticipation 
of issuance of revenue bonds; acquire real and personal 
property; employ professional, managerial and other 
employees deemed necessary and fix their compensation 



to be paid solely out of revenues of the Authority; appear 
before other government agencies; apply for and receive 
federal or other grants of funds; and enter into contracts 
and agreements. 

The Authority will build and operate all new gener- 
ating and transmission facilities in the Commonwealth 
and has the option to purchase existing facilities through 
negotiation, condemnation or eminent domain. After an 
initial two-year period, no other utility may construct 
a new facility unless the Authority certifies that it lacks 
the capability to finance the facility and the facility 
would further the purposes of the act. 

The Authority will finance its activities by issuing 
revenue bonds. The bonds will be exempt from state 
taxation, but will not be backed by the full faith and 
credit of the Commonwealth. Power will be sold to other 
utilities by contract but no special discounts or bonuses 
to promote the increased use of power may be given. 
Public hearings are required on all major contracts. 

The Authority is required to develop a master, 20- 
year demand study and siting plan within 18 months 
of its incorporation, to be updated each succeeding year. 
Sites will be selected in accordance with the Electric 
Power Facilities Siting Council Act of 1973. The Gover- 
nor and the community in which any facility is to be 
located must affirmatively approve the facility before it 
can be constructed. 

The Authority will be subject to all applicable federal 
and state environmental standards and must obtain all 
necessary federal and state permits and complete all 
necessary environmental impact statements. 

The Authority will be exempt from taxation but will 
make payments in lieu of taxes to cities and towns in an 
amount equal to the tax which would be paid if the 
Authority's real and personal property were owned by a 
private electric utility company. 

The Authority is forbidden from engaging in promo- 
tional or image advertising. The Authority has the 
authority to bargain collectively with its employees and 
is subject to the provisions of Chapter 150 of the General 
Laws, which governs the conciliation and arbitration of 
industrial disputes. Employees of the Authority are not 
subject to the civil service law and rules. Employees of 
utilities displaced by the activities of the Authority have 
first preference in employment by the Authority. 

Section 2 of the act amends section 43 of Chapter 164 
of the General Laws to provide that if a city or town 
votes, in accordance with the provisions of Chapter 
164, to establish a municipal utility and acquire the 
facilities of the utility currently serving the community, 
and the utility refuses to sell its property to the city 
or town, that the Department of Public Utilities will 
establish a fair price for the facilities, and the utility 
will be required to accept the price determined by the 
department and tender the deed for the facilities to the 
city or town. 

Question No. 5. Law Proposed by Initiative Petition 

(This question appeared as question 5(a) in the Infor- 
mation for Voters booklet) 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which 



47 



was disapproved by the House of Representatives on 
May 3, 1976, by a vote of 197-35, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 



The proposed legislation would prohibit the possession, 
ownership, or sale of any weapon from which a shot or 
bullet can be discharged and which has a barrel length 
of less than sixteen inches. The prohibition would not 
apply to military personnel, law enforcement officers, 
federally licenses handgun manufacturers and whole- 
salers, common carriers in the ordinary course of trans- 
port, or to historical societies and museums. The act 
would not affect the possession of rifles, shotguns, and 
certain antiques and replicas. The proposal also does 
not change the existing statutory penalties for unlawful 
possession, ownership or sale of handguns, including 
provision imposing mandatory jail sentences. 

The proposal would permit owners of handguns to 
surrender their weapons to any law enforcement agency 
in the Commonwealth within six months of the effective 
date of the act without incurring criminal liability. Those 
surrendering handguns within that six months will be 
compensated at a rate to be determined by the Com- 
missioner of Public Safety. 

Question No. 6. Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which 
was disapproved by the House of Representatives on 
May 3, 1976, by a vote of 146-85, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 



The proposed act would require every beverage con- 
tainer sold or offered for sale in the Commonwealth to 
have a refund value of at least five (5) cents, and would 
prohibit the sale of metal beverage containers with flip- 
tops. It would apply to containers for beer and other 
malt beverages and to soft drinks. It would not apply 
to containers for dairy products or natural fruit juices, 
nor to containers which are biodegradable. 



that every electric utility company charge a uniform 
rate per kilowatt hour of electricity. The proposed act 
would except from this general rule rates charged to 
other electric utility companies and to residential cus- 
tomers who heat their principle place of residence by 
electricity. The Act would also permit a different rate 
to be charged residential customers for the firts three 
hundred (300) kilowatt hours they consume each month, 
and would authorize "peak load" pricing whereby a 
higher rate than the uniform rate per kilowatt hour may 
be charged during the periods of the day or seasons of 
the year when consumption of electricity is the greatest. 
The Act would authorize the Department of Public 
Utilities to issue implementing rules and regulations and 
provides for enforcement. 

Question No. 8. This Question is Not Binding 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: 

"Shall the General Court enact legislation authorizing 
the construction of an oil refinery and a deep water port, 
subject to the approval of those communities directly 
affected and any reservations that the general court may 
prescribe?" 



YES 
NO 



Summary 

The Legislature has placed this question on the 
ballot in order to determine whether the people favor 
or oppose the construction of an oil refinery and deep 
water port in Massachusetts. The vote on this question 
is not binding on the Legislature. The question deals 
with the general advisability of such construction and 
is not a specific proposal for a facility. If a specific 
proposal is made, it would be subject to approval by the 
communities directly affected and subject to any restric- 
tions imposed by the Legislature. 

Question No. 9. This Question is Not Binding 

The following is a non-binding advisory question: 

"Shall retail stores including package liquor stores, so 
called, be allowed to open for business on Sunday?" 



YES 
NO 



The act would authorize the Secretary of Environ- 
mental Affairs to certify containers as reusable or re- 
cyclable. It contains both enforcement and penalty 
provisions and would take effect on February 1, 1977. 

Question No. 7. Law Proposed by an Initiative Petition 

Do you approve of a law summarized below, which 
was disapproved by the House of Representatives on 
May 3, 1976, by a vote of 182-49, and on which no 
vote was taken by the Senate before May 5, 1976? 



YES 
NO 



Summary 
The proposed act would impose a general requirement 



Summary 

The Legislature has placed this question on the ballot 
in order to determine whether the people favor or oppose 
the Sunday opening of certain retail stores, including 
package liquor stores. As the law now stands, most 
retail and all package liquor stores must be closed on 
Sundays. The vote on this question is not binding on 
the Legislature. 

The polls will be open from 8:00 A.M. to 8:00 P.M. 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 



48 



Given under our hands this 21st day of October, 1 976. 

S/Paul C. Hart, Chairman 
S/Philip L. Currier, Vice Chairman 
S/Thomas A. Palmer, Jr., Clerk 
S/William R. Murphy 
S/ArnoldJ. Lovering 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. October 22, 1976 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified 
and warned the Inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School- All Purpose Room; 
North Elementary School Auditorium; Colonel Moses 
Parker Junior High School Band Room; East Chelms- 



ford School; Byam School Cafetorium; Westlands School 
Cafeteria; North Elementary School Auditorium; Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School; 
South Row School Auditorium; South Row School 
Auditorium; Westlands School Cafeteria; Fire House- 
Old Westford Road, seven days at least before the time 
appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 

A true copy, Attest: 

S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 



STATE ELECTION 

November 2, 1976 



Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Prec. Total 
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 



PRESIDENT & VICE PRESIDENT 



Anderson & Shackelford 





1 


2 





3 





3 





1 


5 





1 


16 


Camejo & Reid 


1 


1 


1 


1 


2 


1 


1 


1 


2 


3 








15 


Carter & Mondale 


609 


655 


734 


440 


810 


623 


604 


399 


547 


790 


549 


648 


7408 


Ford & Dole 


785 


386 


861 


224 


908 


642 


452 


639 


484 


876 


514 


839 


7610 


LaRoucheJr. & Evans 


3 





1 





2 





3 


2 


2 


7 


1 


1 


22 


McCarthy & Stouffer 


37 


18 


55 


7 


35 


28 


24 


22 


27 


40 


26 


34 


353 


Bubar & Dodge 









































Lavin & Blomen 









































MacBridge & Bergland 























1 














1 


Wright & Spock 





























1 








1 


All Others 


7 


5 


12 


2 


5 





1 


5 








2 


3 


42 


Blanks 


11 


8 


11 


8 


10 


16 


17 


3 


5 


17 


17 


6 


129 


TOTAL 


1453 


1074 


1677 


682 


1775 


1311 


1105 


1072 


1068 


1739 


1109 


1532 


15,597 


U.S. SENATE 




























Edward M. Kennedy 


834 


768 


1033 


489 


1066 


834 


746 


602 


731 


1052 


706 


923 


9784 


Michael S. Robertson 


584 


265 


594 


167 


661 


438 


316 


440 


318 


634 


375 


565 


5357 


Carol Henderson Evans 


7 


7 


12 


6 


11 


4 


11 


6 


2 


9 


8 


11 


94 


H. Graham Lowry 


3 


6 


4 


6 


11 


9 


8 


5 


5 


12 


4 


4 


77 


David Crocker 


3 


10 











1 


3 


1 








1 


1 


20 


All Others 





1 


5 


1 





3 




















10 


Blanks 


22 


17 


29 


13 


26 


22 


21 


18 


12 


32 


15 


28 


255 



TOTAL 



1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 



CONGRESSMAN 5th District 

Paul E. Tsongas 753 659 956 

Roger P. Durkin 658 390 683 

All Others 1 1 1 

Blanks 41 24 37 



415 1036 720 619 529 665 1008 632 900 8892 

452 591 6304 

5 

25 41 396 



252 


688 


560 


448 


509 


383 


690 











1 





1 





15 


51 


31 


37 


34 


19 


41 



TOTAL 



1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1( 



1739 1109 1532 15,597 



COUNCILLOR 3rd District 

Herbert L. Connolly 1017 827 1188 

All Others 1 2 

Blanks 436 246 487 



TOTAL 



544 


1257 


965 


848 


725 


1 














137 


518 


346 


257 


347 



764 1234 820 1058 11,247 

3 4 3 1 15 

301 501 286 473 4335 



1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 



49 



SENATOR 5th Middlesex District 



Ronald C. Mac 


:Kenzie 


734 


415 


806 


229 


899 


574 


426 


567 


486 


811 


473 


735 


7155 


John J. Leary 




597 


610 


771 


420 


749 


657 


618 


421 


536 


820 


577 


686 


7462 


All Others 







1 


























1 





2 


Blanks 




122 


48 


100 


33 


127 


80 


61 


84 


46 


108 


58 


111 


978 


TOTAL 




1453 


1074 


1677 


682 


1775 


1311 


1105 


1072 


1068 


1739 


1109 


1532 


15,597 



1463 

1 

311 


1101 

3 

207 


926 

1 

145 


913 

3 

152 


1452 

2 

285 


1280 

2 

250 


9791 

15 

1821 


1775 
Vliddlc 


1311 

:sex District 

859 

2 

244 


1072 


1068 


1739 


1532 


11,627 

1697 

3 

479 



REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 43rd Middlesex District 
Precincts 1, 3, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 12 Only 
Bruce N. Freeman 1241 1415 

All Others 1 2 

Blanks 211 260 

TOTAL 1453 1677 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 4 i iddl isuici 

Precincts 2 & 7 Only 

Philip L. Shea 838 

All Others 1 

Blanks 235 

TOTAL 1074 1105 2179 

REPRESENTATIVE IN GENERAL COURT 47th Middlesex District 

Precincts 4 & 1 1 Only 

Edward A. LeLacheur 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 

CLERK OF COURTS Middlesex County 
Edward J. Sullivan 690 732 891 

Joan R. Needleman 610 272 625 

All Others 11 

Blanks 153 69 160 

TOTAL 1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 

REGISTER OF DEEDS Middlesex Northern District 

Ed ward J. Early Jr. 618 583 656 365 698 636 517 406 448 711 587 598 6833 

Martin F. Delmore 668 436 864 285 897 579 515 556 532 880 437 782 7431 

All Others 000031000000 4 

Blanks 167 55 157 32 177 95 73 110 88 148 75 152 1329 



573 














847 




1420 

















4 




4 


109 














258 
1109 




367 


682 


1791 


459 


948 


757 


690 


473 


616 


924 


663 


750 


8593 


181 


679 


461 


335 


492 


347 


652 


374 


623 


5651 


























1 


3 


42 


148 


93 


80 


107 


105 


163 


72 


158 


1350 



665 


520 


829 


344 


824 


679 


538 


461 


494 


784 


543 


718 


7399 


591 


293 


690 


182 


690 


497 


359 


484 


376 


655 


409 


651 


5877 


647 


669 


789 


432 


859 


695 


641 


487 


582 


888 


603 


697 


7989 





1 














1 


1 














3 


1003 


665 


1046 


406 


1177 


751 


671 


711 


684 


1151 


663 


998 


9926 



TOTAL 1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 

COUNTY COMMISSIONER (2) Middlesex 

S. Lester Ralph 

Carl J. Cincotta 

Michael E. McLauj 

All Others 

Blanks 

TOTAL 2906 2148 3354 1364 3550 2622 2210 2144 2136 3478 2218 3064 31,194 

QUESTION #1 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

TOTAL 1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 

QUESTION #2 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

TOTAL 1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 

50 



854 


555 


1012 


354 


1060 


699 


589 


653 


659 


1011 


579 


971 


8996 


551 


477 


634 


305 


666 


535 


475 


387 


373 


693 


482 


535 


6113 


48 


42 


31 


23 


49 


77 


41 


32 


36 


35 


48 


26 


488 



292 


199 


288 


141 


331 


238 


220 


653 


191 


347 


225 


237 


3362 


1101 


828 


1354 


511 


1393 


997 


838 


387 


844 


1345 


838 


1273 


11,709 


60 


47 


35 


30 


51 


76 


47 


32 


33 


47 


46 


22 


526 



QUESTION #3 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 



TOTAL 

QUESTION #9 

YES 

NO 

Blanks 

TOTAL 



783 


515 


990 


315 


946 


656 


516 


605 


600 


977 


597 


496 


646 


329 


753 


560 


533 


433 


429 


711 


73 


63 


41 


38 


76 


95 


56 


34 


39 


51 



557 961 8421 

491 537 6515 

61 34 661 



TOTAL 




1453 


1074 


1677 


682 


1775 


1311 


1105 


1072 


1068 


1739 


1109 


1532 


15,597 


QUESTION 
YES 


#4 


147 


116 


185 


81 


232 


144 


127 


97 


145 


187 


111 


140 


1712 


NO 




1247 


899 


1445 


570 


1486 


1085 


926 


936 


894 


1502 


955 


1364 


13,309 


Blanks 




59 


59 
1074 


47 
1677 


31 
682 


57 
1775 


82 
1311 


52 
1105 


39 
1072 


29 
1068 


50 
1739 


43 
1109 


28 
1532 


576 


TOTAL 


1453 


15,597 


QUESTION 
YES 


#5 


397 


209 


543 


141 


468 


332 


224 


343 


298 


526 


310 


528 


4319 


NO 




1013 


844 


1104 


515 


1265 


928 


841 


716 


749 


1186 


759 


987 


10,907 


Blanks 




43 


21 
1074 


30 

1677 


26 
683 


42 
1775 


51 
1311 


40 
1105 


13 
1072 


21 
1068 


27 
1739 


40 
1109 


17 
1532 


371 


TOTAL 


1453 


15,597 


QUESTION 
YES 


#6 


709 


406 


862 


302 


869 


547 


438 


527 


524 


857 


503 


790 


7334 


NO 




712 


654 


799 


366 


884 


717 


636 


537 


529 


867 


588 


737 


8026 


Blanks 




32 


14 


16 


14 


22 


47 


31 


8 


15 


15 


18 


5 


237 


TOTAL 




1453 


1074 


1677 


682 


1775 


1311 


1105 


1072 


1068 


1739 


1109 


1532 


15,597 


QUESTION i 
YES 


¥7 


301 


209 


360 


149 


358 


239 


221 


198 


235 


416 


265 


295 


3246 


NO 




1105 


835 


1279 


509 


1385 


1013 


849 


852 


808 


1280 


819 


1213 


11,947 


Blanks 




47 


30 
1074 


38 


24 
682 


32 
1775 


59 
1311 


35 
1105 


22 
1072 


25 
1068 


43 
1739 


25 


24 


404 


TOTAL 


1453 


1677 


1109 


1532 


15,597 


QUESTION i 
YES 


¥8 


922 


685 


1157 


404 


1207 


867 


728 


749 


724 


1190 


727 


1079 


10,439 


NO 




444 


331 


468 


240 


497 


346 


315 


279 


301 


483 


326 


410 


4440 


Blanks 




87 


58 


52 


38 


71 


98 


62 


44 


43 


66 


56 


43 


718 



1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 



808 


651 


959 


383 


1114 


724 


669 


568 


386 


676 


268 


610 


506 


395 


77 


37 


42 


31 


51 


81 


41 



635 631 1044 
405 402 646 
32 35 49 



617 908 9143 

454 585 5901 

38 39 553 



1453 1074 1677 682 1775 1311 1105 1072 1068 1739 1109 1532 15,597 



WARRANT FOR SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 1, 1976 

COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 

MIDDLESEX, SS. 

To the Constable, or any other suitable person of the 
Town of Chelmsford: 

GREETING: 

In the name of the Commonwealth aforesaid, you 
are hereby requested to notify and warn the legal voters 
of said Chelmsford to meet in the Chelmsford High 
School Gymnasium on Wednesday, the first day Decem- 
ber, 1976 at 7:30 P.M. o'clock in the evening, then and 
there to act upon the following articles, viz: 



ARTICLE 1 . To see if the Town will transfer from 
available funds a certain sum of money with which to 
meet bills for previous years; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 2. To see if the Town will transfer from 
available funds the sum of $1,450 to pay the Treasurer 
of Middlesex County Retirement System, said amount 
needed to honor corrected assessment; or act in relation 
thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 3. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
$10,000 from the sale of Graves & Lots to Cemetery 
Improvement & Development Fund; or act in relation 
thereto. 



Cemetery Commissioners 



51 



ARTICLE 4. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to apply for and expend funds 
under the Public Works Employment Act; or act in 
relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 5. To see if the Town will vote to transfer 
from available funds the sum of $10,000 to be used for 
procuring plans and specifications for a proposed new 
Town Hall to be located at 11 North Road, Chelmsford; 
or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 

ARTICLE 6. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Board of Selectmen to expend the sum of $18,000 
for the installation of traffic control devices on Chelms- 
ford Street in the vicinity of the Chelmsford Mall, as 
voted under Article 13, Special Town Meeting, October 
1974; or act in relation thereto. 

Board of Selectmen 



ARTICLE 7. To see if the Town will vote to amend 
the present Zoning Bylaw and Zoning Map by rezoning 
from Residential District (Single Residence - RB) to a 
Commercial District (Shopping Center - CC) the follow- 
ing land in the Town of Chelmsford: Beginning at the 
Southerly portion of the premises at the corner of Ever- 
green and Chelmsford Streets, thence: 



SOUTHWESTERLY 
NORTHWESTERLY 

SOUTHWESTERLY 

NORTHWESTERLY 

NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 



by Evergreen Street, 552.90 feet, 

more or less; 

by land now or formerly of 

Richard O. and Carol A. Lahue, 

Jr., 100.58 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 

Richard O. and Carol A. Lahue, 

Jr., 29.38 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 

Fiorina S. and Joseph S. Athaids, 

98 feet, more or less; 

by land of Valley Properties, Inc. 

615.47 feet, more or less; and 

by Chelmsford Street, 199 feet, 

more or less to the point of 

beginning. 



or act in relation thereto. 



Petition 



ARTICLE 8. To see if the Town will vote to authorize 
the Sewer Commission to proceed with the application 
for State and Federal grants for sewage collection and 
treatment and to authorize said Sewer Commission to 
award an engineering contract for the preparation of 
detailed plans and specifications in accordance with 
the sewerage plan recommended by the Sewer Com- 
mission in the "Facilities Plan - Step I for the Town of 
Chelmsford", Nov.. 1976; that the Treasurer, with the 
approval of the Selectmen, be authorized to borrow the 
sum of $1,200,000 for said purpose by issuing bonds or 
notes of the Town therefor not exceeding thirty (30) 
years under General Laws Chapter 44, Section 8 (15); 
and that the Sewer Commission is authorized to accept 
State and Federal grants for the project to be used in 



lieu of, or in part of, the foregoing appropriation; or 
act in relation thereto. 

Sewer Commission 

Hereof fail not and make return of this Warrant 
with your doings thereon to the Town Clerk at the time 
and place of holding this meeting aforesaid. 

Given under our hands this 8th day of November, 
1976. 

S/Paul C. Hart, Chairman 
S/Philip L. Currier, Vice Chairman 
S/Thomas A. Palmer, Jr., Clerk 
S/William R. Murphy 
S/ArnoldJ. Lovering 



COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
MIDDLESEX, SS. 

Pursuant to the within Warrant, I have notified 
and warned the inhabitants of the Town of Chelmsford 
by posting up attested copies of same at the following 
places, to wit: McFarlin School-All Purpose Room, 
North Elementary School Auditorium, Colonel Moses 
Parker Junior High School Band Room, East Chelms- 
ford School, Byam School Cafetorium, Westlands School 
Cafeteria, North Elementary School Auditorium, Small 
Gymnasium, C. Edith McCarthy Junior High School, 
South Row School Auditorium, South Row School 
Auditorium, Westlands School Cafeteria, and Fire 
House-Old Westford Road seven days at least before 
the time appointed for holding the meeting aforesaid. 

S/William E. Spence 
Constable of Chelmsford 
Nov. 15, 1976 



SPECIAL TOWN MEETING 
December 1, 1976 

The Special Town Meeting was called to order at 
8:00 P.M. by Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin, Jr. who 
recognized the presence of a quorum. There were 470 
voters present. 

Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, Paul C. Hart, 
moved that the reading of the Constable's return of 
service and the posting of the warrant be waived. It was 
so voted, unanimously. Mr. Hart moved that the reading 
of the entire warrant be waived. It was so voted unani- 
mously. 



The following tellers were appointed: 

Ina Greenblatt 
Carl Olsson 
Richard Burtt 



Dan Burke 

Charles Fairburn 

Charles Coffey 



Selectman Arnold J. Lovering made a presentation 
to three students who are visiting our country thru the 
AFS Program (American Field Service Program), Lars 
Astrand from Helsingborg Sweden, Gregg Zimmerman 
from Grafton Wise, and Ingrid Franke from Ludenschud 
Germany. 



52 



Moderator Daniel J. Coughlin Jr. introduced the new 
member of the Finance Committee, Mr. James Decker. 
The moderator also thanked the Town Counsel, Clement 
McCarthy, for a job well done, as this will be his last 
attended Town Meeting as our Town Counsel. 

A discussion pertaining taking Article 7 out of order 
and placing it before Article 1 followed: 

Attorney James Paisley representing DeMoulas Markets 
made a motion to advance Out of Order Article 7 
before Article 1. Mrs. Ruth Delaney spoke against 
taking the article out of order, Paul C. Hart, Chairman 
of the Board of Selectmen, spoke against taking the 
Article out of order as did A. Robert Rabb, Chairman 
of the Planning Board. 

The motion to take Article 7 out of order was voted 
on and defeated. 

UNDER ARTICLE 1. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $2,315.00 to meet bills for previous years. 

Selectman Thomas Palmer spoke in favor of this 
article. 

A 9/10 vote required - Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 2. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to transfer from available funds the sum 
of $1,450.00 to pay the Treasurer of Middlesex County 
Retirement system, said amount needed to honor 
corrected assessment. 

Sel. Thomas Palmer spoke in favor of the article. 

Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 3. Mr. Gerald Hardy moved that 
the Town vote to transfer $10,000.00 from the sale of 
Graves & Lots to Cemetery Improvement & Develop- 
ment Fund. 

Finance Committee member Richard Sullivan recom- 
mended this article. 

Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 4. Mr. Paul C. Hart moved that 
the Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to 
apply for and expend funds under the Public Works 
Employment Act. 

Sel. Arnold Lovering spoke in favor of this article. 
The Finance Committee supported this article. 

Motion carried, unanimously. 

UNDER ARTICLE 5. Paul C. Hart moved that the 
Town vote to transfer from available funds the sum of 
$10,000.00 to be used for procurring plans and speci- 
fications for a proposed new Town Hall to be located 
at 11 North Road, Chelmsford. 

A discussion followed, Sel. Lovering explained this 
motion would give the Selectmen the right to spend up 
to $10,000.00 to get together plans for a new Town 
Hall in order to get funds, when they are available 
from Federal funds. The Finance Committee supported 



this article. Mr. Jacob Sartz didn't like the idea of the 
Selectmen getting a blank check and being able to do 
what ever they wanted with the money. Mr. Soucey 
opposed the article. Mr. Drury wanted to know if the 
Emersom house would be demolished. Sel. Lovering 
stated that the house might be moved to another loca- 
tion in town but if it was to be demolished it would 
have to come before the town body for approval. 

A vote was taken on the motion by voice, which left 
the chair in doubt - a showing of hands resulted in 
the motion being passed. 

UNDER ARTICLE 6. Paul C. Hart moved that the 
Town vote to authorize the Board of Selectmen to expend 
the sum of $18,000.00 for the installation of traffic 
control devices on Chelmsford Street in the vicinity of 
the Chelmsford Mall, as voted under Article 13, Special 
Town Meeting, October, 1974. 

A discussion followed: Sel. Philip Currier spoke in 
favor of this article and urge supporting the article. 
The Finance Committee supported the article. Mr. 
William McDonough stated that traffic lights were not 
needed in the area, Sel. Currier explained that the lights 
were Pedestrian crossing lights not traffic control lights. 

James Harrington past president of the Westland's 
School PTA supported the article. 

A vote was taken on the motion. Motion carried. 

UNDER ARTICLE 7. Mr. Frank Bove moved that the 
Town vote to amend the present zoning by-law and 
zoning map by rezoning from residential district (single 
residence-RB) to a Commercial District (Shopping 
center - CC) the following described land in the Town 
of Chelmsford, 

Beginning at the Southerly portion of the premises 
at the corner of Evergreen and Chelmsford Streets, 
thence: 



by Evergreen Street, 552.90 feet, 

more or less; 

by land now or formerly of 

Richard O. and Carol A. Lahue, 

Jr., 100.58 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 

Richard O. and Carol A Lahue, 

Jr., 29.38 feet; 

by land now or formerly of 

Fiorina S. and Joseph S. Athaids, 

98 feet, more or less; 

by land of Valley Properties, Inc. 

615.47 feet, more or less; and 

by Chelmsford Street, 199 feet, 

more or less, to the point of 

beginning. 

The Finance Committee was opposed to the Article. 
A discussion followed. Mr. Arthur Anton made a motion 
to dismiss and refer Article 7 to the Board of Appeals 
for further study. Reggie Larkin spoke against the article 
being dismissed as it could come back at a future Town 
Meeting. Mrs. Delaney, Mr. Robert Rabb and John 
Conrad all spoke against the article being dismissed. 
James Paisley approved of the article being dismissed. 
Mr. Edward Hilliard wanted the motion defeated in 
order to give guidelines to the Board of Appeals. Mr. 



SOUTHWESTERLY 
NORTHWESTERLY 

SOUTHWESTERLY 

NORTHWESTERLY 

NORTHEASTERLY 
SOUTHEASTERLY 



53 



Timothy Hehir moved the question to stop debate on 
the Motion to dismiss the article and refer the article 
to the Board of Appeals. 

A vote was taken to stop debate. Motion carried. A 
vote was taken on the motion to dismiss the article and 
refer it to the board of Appeals. Motion defeated. 

A discussion followed on the main motion. Mr. Rabb 
stated that as a result of the Public hearing on the above 
article the Planning Board vote unanimously not to re- 
commend the article. John McNally moved the question 
to stop debate. 

A vote was taken to stop debate. Motion carried 
unanimously. On the main motion a 2/3 vote is required. 
Motion defeated. 
65 Yes 384 No 

UNDER ARTICLE 8. Joseph Gutwien moved that the 
sum of $1,200,000.00 be appropriated for the cost of 
engineering services for plans and specifications for 
sewers, sewerage systems and sewage treatment and dis- 
posal facilities in accordance with the Sewer Com- 
mission's recommendations in "Facilities Plan - Step I 
for the Town of Chelmsford", dated November, 1976; 
that to meet this appropriation the Treasurer with the 
approval of the Selectmen is authorized to borrow 
$1,200,000.00 under G.L. C. 44 s 7 (22) as amended; 
that the Sewer Commission with the approval of the 
Selectmen is authorized to contract for and expend any 
state or federal grants available for the project, provided 
that the total authorized borrowing shall be reduced 



by the amount of any such grants available to meet 
planning costs; and that the Sewer Commission is 
authorized to award engineering contracts and to take 
all other action necessary to carry out this vote. 

Mr. Matthew Doyle, and Joseph Gutwein Sewer Com- 
missioners and Peter Dulchinos Board of Health member 
discussed the above article asking for support of the 
article. Mr. Paul C. Hart from the Board of Selectmen 
endorsed the article, the Finance Committee supported 
the article. After a discussion on the Article Mr. Timothy 
Hehir moved the question to stop debate. A vote was 
taken on the motion to stop debate. 

Motion passed unanimously. 

A vote was taken on the main motion, 2/3 vote 
required. 



Yes 268 No 78 



It was so voted. 



Paul C. Hart, Chairman of the Board of Selectmen, 
moved for adjournment sine die at 10:25 P.M. 

DanielJ. Coughlinjr. 
Moderator 



Mary E. St.Hilaire 
Town Clerk 

Total Article approp. 



$23,765.00 




SCHOOL COMMITTEE 



CarolC. Cleven, Vice-Chairman 
Robert D. Hall, Secretary 



WilliamJ. Reynolds, Chairman 



Nicola Argerake, High School Student Member 
Thomas L. Rivard, Superintendent 



Rev. Harry A. Foster 
MyraJ. Silver 



54 



Teachers 



Year 

1971 
1972 
1973 
1974 
1975 
1976-77 



1 Includes Part Time Personnel 

2 Includes Federal Funds 

3 Eighteen Month Budget (1/1/73 - 6/30/74) 

4 Not Finalized until 6/30/77 



486 


260 


497 


273 


512 


296 


548 


324 


553 


331 


565 


336 



Non-Teachers' Budget 2 



7,296,850. 

8,305,023. 
14, 767, 112. 3 
10,660,533. 
11,719,467. 
12,348,725. 



Expenditures 2 


Enrollment 


7,070,708. 


9,002 


8,090,812. 


8,990 


14,328,428. 


9,059 


10,532,793. 


9,627 


11,719,112. 


9,555 


4 


9,311 



There were many discernible themes permeating the 
operation of the Chelmsford Public School during 1976. 
They arose from areas of concern which concentrated 
on shrinking economic resources, inflation, declining 
student enrollment, school bussing, and continued 
demands for increased services. Collective bargaining 
continues to occupy the School Committee's time for 
literally hundreds of hours in addition to the hours of 
the regular School Committee's meetings. This past year 
contracts were negotiated with the teachers, administra- 
tors, school food service, secretaries, teacher aides and 
custodians. 

The members of the School Committee were active 
in both the Merrimack Valley Association of School 
Committees and the Massachusetts Association of School 
Committees. 

Five bills were filed with the Massachusetts General 
Court by Mr. Robert Hall, Chairman of the Merrimack 
Valley Association of School Committees, and one bill 
was filed jointly by Mr. Hall and Mr. Reynolds. Of 
primary concern to the School Committee were those bills 
which related to funding/reimbursement problems. 
Consequently, a number of those bills filed are designed 
to relieve Chelmsford as well as other communities 
from financial burdens which the town has had and con- 
tinues to experience. 

This report provides highlights of the system to 
illustrate the complex relationships that underlie the 
educational program for children from kindergarten 
through the twelfth grade in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools. 

The increasing involvement of students, staff and 
parents in all aspects of our school life is apparent. It 
will become more formal and more obvious as time goes 
on and greater opportunities for discussion and dialogue 
occur. Parent participation in the education of their 
children should not be regarded as an opportunity pro- 
vided by a school system, but as a right of the parent. 

Nineteen seventy-six was a significant year in system- 
wide planning. The cross level and cross discipline in- 
volvement was greater than during any other preceding 
year. The effort should bring about a plan designed and 
geared to meet the changes that are continually brought 
about by the community and by society as a whole. The 
project shall be a never ending endeavor to provide the 
most effective, relevant and accountable curriculum for 
the youth of this community. 



Efforts in the elementary schools are focused on 
developing alternative instructional strategies that offer 
educational results for pupils who participate in them. 
Coupled with this effort, an Ad Hoc Committee of 
administrators, teachers and parents has been organized 
in each elementary school. The School Committee is 
pleased with the work and progress of these committees. 

Alternative instructional strategies are working very 
well at the McFarlin School. To permit several basic 
considerations to be met, the organizational philosophy 
of the McFarlin School is characterized as a "School of 
Alternatives." A basic consideration in the designation 
of the McFarlin School was a strong desire to maintain, 
as much as possible, the essential features of the ele- 
mentary schools feeding students into the McFarlin 
complex. Such a consideration was necessary in the desire 
to solidify and extend each student's program in pre- 
paration for the transition to the town's secondary 
schools. Coupled with this desire was the existence of 
the town's modified open enrollment policy which per- 
mitted parents to exercise an option in the choice of 
educational programs. In a central school, such as the 
McFarlin School, increased attention could be devoted 
to this concern, given the presence of the total population 
of students and faculty. 

Recent research suggests additional basic concerns 
which must be considered in creating a "School of Al- 
ternatives." In attempting to create contemporary educa- 
tional programs designed to meet the needs of the 
individual's cognitive, affective, and psychomotor devel- 
opmental patterns, definitive psychological assessment of 
the learning profile of individual students must be 
undertaken. Attention must be devoted to the methods 
of instruction by which individual students can best 
learn. In the design of the McFarlin School this con- 
sideration played a vital role in the structuring of alter- 
native patterns. 

At the McFarlin School, students and teachers are 
organized into "clusters". These "clusters" range in size 
from 60 to 150 students working with two to five class- 
room teachers and a "cluster" of specialists in Art, 
Vocal Music, Instrumental Music, Physical Education, 
Reading, Learning Disabilities, and Guidance. Addi- 
tional Specialists available to the student body include 
the Resource Room teacher and the Intercluster Teacher 
who provide concentrated individualized attention as the 
need exists. This "Cluster" design permits the student 
entering the McFarlin School to identify closely with a 
given group of students and teachers, and it thus fosters 



55 



the development of personalized working relationships. 

"Clusters," totalling ten in number, vary in their 
organization for instruction. In some clusters children 
work in self-contained classrooms with one teacher and 
specialists, as needed, for the total school day. Team- 
teaching exists in other clusters. In this organization, 
children are deployed between/among several teachers 
during the course of the typical school day. 

"Clusters" also vary in the emphasis placed on tradi- 
tional and open-concept teaching strategies. The staff 
feels that careful attention to these variations is essential 
in meeting the total needs of the student body. 

To promote strong communication at McFarlin School 
between/among the "clusters" and the administration, 
three basic advisory committees exist: 

1. Staff Advisory Council (S.A.C.) which functions in 
assisting the administration in the formulation of school 
policy. 

2. Parent Advisory Council (P.A.C.) which has assumed 
the responsibilities of: assisting in community advisory 
considerations; recruiting and coordinating the School 
Volunteer Program which employs parent-volunteering 
in assisting in selected instructional functions; and 
developing a fund-raising program for the McFarlin 
School. 

3. Student Council (S.C.) which is comprised of repre- 
sentatives from all clusters of the McFarlin School and 
serves as the student government. 

Each of these bodies meets regularly in assisting in an 
overall coordination effort. 

Title I services were again provided in the North and 
Westlands Schools. As in the previous year, the focus 
of the program was on service to young children. The 
Title I teachers work with individuals and with small 



groups of children, assisting them in language, motor, 
social, and cognitive development, and in the learning 
of reading and mathematics. The program was enriched 
through field trips which enhanced the children's aware- 
ness of the environment and contributed much to the 
growth of their vocabulary. A Parent Advisory Council 
was active in each school. 

Of increasing concern to the School Committee has 
been the precipitous rise of special education (Chapter 
766) costs, now the exclusive responsibility of the local 
School Committee, formerly paid wholly or in part by 
the State. Any child between the ages of three and 
twenty-two years, who has not obtained a high school 
diploma or its equivalent, and for whom it has been 
determined by the Administrator of Special Education 
to be in need of special education services, is considered 
a "special needs student". 

Special education (Chapter 766) which in 1974-75 
constituted 5.05% of the budget, comprised 7.24% of 
the budget in 1976-77. The increase was mostly for 
expensive out of district placements projected for 1977. 

Chelmsford's official enrollment of 9,31 1 for the school 
year 1976-77 represents a decline of 244 students or 
2.62% from the 9,555 enrolled in 1975-76. All of the 
enrollment decline has occurred at the elementary level. 
This decline in enrollment which resulted in an estimated 
savings of $50,000 in the current school budget per- 
mitted the School Committee to close the Highland 
School in September. It is estimated that the rate of 
decline will continue at the same level for the next 
several years. 

The specific enrollment details for all schools by 
grade level is depicted below: 



STUDENT ENROLLMENT 



School 

Byam 
Center 

Harrington 

McFarlin 

North 

South Row 

Westlands 

McCarthy 

Parker 

High 

Totals 



119 
72 
125 



Gr. 1 

91 



134 
89 
124 



Gr. 2 Gr. 3 Gr. 4 Gr. 5 Gr. 6 



125 

95 
119 

142 
102 
129 



111 
100 
114 

115 
85 
123 



125 

99 
130 

122 
89 
121 



99 
147 
59 

116 
184 



Gr. 7 


Gr. 8 


Gr. 9 


Gr. 10 Gr. 11 Gr. 12 


Sp.Ed. 

19 

9 

20 


Total 

644 
585 
715 
828 
632 
573 
806 


463 


467 


426 






1356 


368 


353 


312 




18 


1051 








705 737 676 + 3 


PG 


2121 


831 


820 


738 


705 737 676 + 3 


66 


9311 



56 



This past June the School Committee was notified 
that the town would no longer be reimbursed the cost 
of bussing children who lived less than one and one-half 
miles from their schools. It was estimated that the loss 
in transportation reimbursement would be approximate- 
ly $250,000 yearly. It was agreed among the members of 
the School Committee that a sidewalk building program 
and a pupil walking program would be initiated over 
the next several years. In September when school opened, 
a walking program was approved for the Center, Mc- 
Farlin, North and Westlands Schools. This resulted in 
reducing the number of operating school buses by eleven 
for the current school year and a gross savings of 
$110,000 yearly. This savings will be partially offset by 
the cost of crossing guards and sidewalk snow removal. 

As of July 1, 1976, the central office was fully 
staffed with the appointment of the Coordinator of 
Mathematics and the Coordinator and Assistant Coor- 
dinator of Language Arts and Reading. The coordina- 
tors and program supervisors are reviewing existing 
curricula and evaluating instructional processes. Each 
coordinator and program supervisor will present his 
findings and recommendations to the School Committee 
by June 30, 1977. 

As has been stated before, planning teaching strategies 
and materials to permit students to progress according 
to their needs is no easy task. Planning for and teaching 
individual students require a commitment of effort and 
time far in excess of the "normal school day". Perhaps 
the following excerpts which are taken from reports 
written by school personnel will help readers of this 
report to understand better some of the learning ex- 
periences their children are having in our schools today. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
LANGUAGE ARTS 

The ability to use and to react to language enables 
us to share in what is meaningful, useful, and creative. 
All of the tools, methods, strategies, and approaches 
that help us to communicate effectively our ideas, 
experiences, and feelings are an integral part of language 
arts instruction. The language arts program in Chelms- 
ford provides a variety of opportunities at all levels for 
developing abilities and skills in English. 

At the elementary level a Scope and Sequence Chart 
outlines appropriate mechanical skills taught at each 
grade level. Comprehensive resource manuals provide 
suggested sequences, exercises, and worksheets for intro- 
ducing and mastering specific skills. Numerous learning 
activity packages in basic skills and in creative writing 
as well as teacher developed units in poetry, newspaper, 
and drama are all used to meet the individual needs 
and interests of students. The imaginative and construc- 
tive use of films, filmstrips, games, transparencies, and 
recorders insures a fuller understanding and appreciation 
of ideas and more excitement and vitality in the learning 
process. Effective teaching approaches currently being 
used include: team teaching, pupil contracts, small 
group discussions, pairing, role playing, and learning 
stations. 

To facilitate the sharing of information among 
teachers, a Language Arts Committee consisting of 
teachers from each grade level has been organized in 
each of the elementary schools. In addition to reviewing 
books and materials from various publishing companies, 



the Committee assesses the strengths and weaknesses 
of the language arts program in grades one to six. 
One member of each Committee serves as a liaison at 
monthly town-wide curriculum meetings. 

The junior hgih schools have devised and implemented 
at each grade level diagnostic and mastery tests in 
grammar, punctuation, and spelling. In addition, a 
Career Unit integrating spelling, vocabulary, and com- 
position skills assists students in occupational selection. 
Teachers concerned with the carry over of basic skills to 
other subjects have been exploring various approaches 
to interdepartmental cooperation. 

A number of units developed through Title III NDEA 
funding, by summer workshops, and by individual 
teachers have become a standard part of the junior high 
school curriculum. The Communications, Research, and 
Short Story units for grade eight and the Bible, Mytho- 
logy, and Shakespeare units for grade nine have been 
highly developed and extensively used. 

To monitor a student's progress in writing, writing 
folders are kept for each student in grades seven to 
nine. These folders are transferred with the student from 
year to year at the junior high and will follow the 
student to the high school. 

To meet the needs and interests of students more 
effectively, the Program of Studies for next September 
at the high school has been revised. The new program 
is predicated on the assumption that students will 
benefit from an English program that provides a reason- 
able balance between elective and required courses, 
between full-year and semester courses, and between 
homogeneous and heterogenous classes. 

All sophomores are now in a year-long program which 
stresses basic skills. The guidelines and materials for 
this program were developed during a summer workshop 
last year. The entire program is supported by a number 
of unifying practices which include: using diagnostic 
and achievement tests in mechanical skills in writing, 
keeping an English folder which makes available the 
accumulated reading and writing assignments of each 
student, and maintaining a reasonable balance in 
teaching basic skills in reading and in writing. In the 
junior year, students can select between full-year and 
one semester courses in American Literature, all of 
which build upon and reinforce skills developed in the 
sophomore curriculum. Seniors plan their own program 
by selecting from among the varied elective offerings 
in literature, writing, and performance. 

The language arts curriculum will continue to change 
to meet the needs of students and the community. The 
ultimate goal, however, of developing an individual's 
use of his language so that he can communicate more 
effectively will remain the same. Students in the Chelms- 
ford schools will always be provided with opportunities 
to grow as readers, writers, listeners, and speakers. 

FROM THE ASSISTANT TO THE LANGUAGE 

ARTS COORDINATOR IN CHARGE OF 

READING 

The Chelmsford school system, as with other good 
public school systems, has the following goals for its 
total reading program. 



57 



1. The developmental reading program aims to help 
children develop all the word analysis, comprehension, 
study skills, and interpretive reading skills essential for 
learning to read with efficiency and understanding. To 
do this, children are instructed in a basal reading series 
most suited to their learning rate and learning style. 
Such basal instruction is continued until the sixth grade 
level. 

In the seventh and eighth grades there are develop- 
mental, corrective, and remedial programs for students 
who want to continue to improve their developmental 
skills, to correct minor reading difficulties, and to 
remediate more serius reading difficulties through indi- 
vidual and small group instruction. 

At the high school level, reading instruction is given 
on an individual basis, according to students' needs, 
whether they be, again, developmental, corrective, or 
remedial in nature. 

2. The corrective reading program is an on-going pro- 
gram carried out in the regular classroom by the class- 
room teacher in consultation with the school reading 
teacher, having the objective of adapting the daily 
reading instruction to meet the needs of children who 
are just slightly behind the average children in a class 
in terms of their mastery of reading skills. With good 
instruction, a child with a slight reading problem should 
be able to overcome the problem in a relatively short 
time so that he will be working at the level of his actual 
potential after the corrective instruction. Again, this 
instruction is given through a basal reading series with 
some intensive skill work tailored to the child's particular 
needs. 

3. The remedial reading program is a program geared 
to correct the more serious reading difficulties of 
children, each such program being structured according 
to each child's needs. The remedial reading programs 
are carried out cooperatively by both the regular class- 
room teacher and the remedial reading teacher working 
together to plan an on-going program of classroom 
instruction augmented and supplemented by a related 
remedial program. The skill work given to remediate 
difficulties is intensive and specific to a child's needs. 
In time, a child should be able to join his peers in 
regular classroom instruction and to be working at the 
level of his own true potential for reading. 

4. The accelerated reading program is designed for 
students who have a particular aptitude or love for 
reading, and for bright children generally, who are able 
to move ahead in skill instruction and application at a 
rate faster than their peers. The foundation of in- 
struction for these students, as for other students, is 
the basal reader to be sure they learn and can apply 
the essential reading skills. However, these students 
should be allowed to move through the level of a basal 
series within a given year at a rate commensurate with 
their abilities; and be guided in doing a great deal of 
supplementary reading in literature, and in-depth re- 
search work in all content areas. They should have a 
chance to share their reading and research work in 
meaningful ways with each other and with the teacher, 
and to be challenged to make 'discoveries and process 
information into meaningful forms to the degree that 
they are able. 

5. The adapted reading program is designed for the 



student whose learning rate is a little slower than average 
for his age. The goals of this child's program are the 
same as for all other chilcren; however, the rate at 
which he is instructed and expected to master each 
respective skill in the learning sequence is slower than 
that for the average child. Again, the foundation of 
instruction for these children is the basal reader, used 
at the rate comfortable and appropriate for the child 
rather than at the rate for average or above average 
children. 

This type of child must always be rewarded for efforts 
that represent his capability for working, even though 
his skill attainment at a given time will be a little 
below that of his chronological peers. The school must 
adapt instruction for him and praise his best efforts 
rather than expect him to conform to an average 
standard that does not apply to him. 

To support all the above phases of a total reading 
program, it is necessary always to encourage much 
reading for pleasure and for general information, and to 
provide the materials, equipment, and facilities to do so. 
This means that there must be libraries well equipped 
with books on multiple topics and appropriate for 
multiple age levels, equipment for listening to good 
literature and informational sources professionally re- 
corded as an alternative means of learning for all 
children, including those who learn best or even pri- 
marily through the auditory channel. The library must 
have enough books that they can be used in the library 
for research and pleasure reading, circulated to class- 
rooms for free time and research reading, and be taken 
home by students for the same reasons. 

In the same way, the listening equipment must be in 
adequate supply so children can use it in the library 
as well as in the classroom to expand their learning 
at their own rates and in their special areas of interest. 

Just as it would be meaningless to drill for years on 
scales and exercises in learning to play a musical instru- 
ment if one never learned to play melodies, it is mean- 
ingless for children to learn more and more reading 
skills every year if they do not have a chance to apply 
continually those skills in reading many kinds of materials 
for many differenct purposes. One only knows whether 
he has mastered a skill when he tries to use it, and 
reading skills are no exception to this rule. 

Along with reading many kinds of material, it is 
imperative that children hear good literature read aloud 
to them every day by teachers, librarians, and recorded 
voices. Hearing good literature is necessary to children's 
reading growth so that they will know the end that is 
hoped for. That is, they will be aware that there is 
plenty of good literature that is very desirable to read 
when they have mastered the skills necessary to do so. 
They must, however, be aware of the potential rewards 
for* learning. In summary, as we learn only by doing, 
children's reading skill increases proportionately as the 
skills are applied in actually reading for a variety of 
purposes. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF MATHEMATICS 

The primary focus of the mathematics program in 
Chelmsford is to foster creativity, competence and 
interest in the field of mathematics. Mathematics is a 
rich and rewarding subject and is one of Civilization's 



58 



oldest and most fascinating pursuits. The mathematics 
program in Chelmsford seeks to develop mathematical 
literacy in all of its students as well as the essential 
ability to be creative problem solvers. Children are asked 
to explore, to consider, to question, and to understand 
not only how, but why mathematical processes are 
generated and defined as they are. 

The elementary program both nationally and in 
Chelmsford has undergone some changes in the past 
ten years. The advantages of so called "New Math" have 
been combined with the advantages of the "Tradi- 
tional" system to produce a strong consistent curriculum 
emphasizing both computational skills and basic con- 
cepts. Today significant effort is being given both to 
the understanding of mathematical methods, and to the 
mastery of basic skill processes. Because performance of 
basic skills is just as important as concept development, 
various drill and practice activities are undertaken so 
as to broaden the level of competence of all students. 

The mathematics curriculum in Chelmsford is or- 
ganized by broad structural concepts which are predi- 
cated on the ability of the learner to make appropriate 
abstractions and generalizations. Because the results of 
academic research can bear tremendous implications in 
curriculum development, much of the curriculum is 
being reviewed and reevaluated. New discoveries and 
statements are constantly being made about how children 
best learn mathematics, and it is important that the 
mathematics curriculum reflect this knowledge. 

The developmental hierarchy of learning tasks sug- 
gested by researchers indicates that concepts in mathe- 
matics must first be met in the concrete or manipulative 
stages. Later, the same ideas are presented and developed 
at the pictorial level. Eventually the children work 
with these notions expressed in symbols - the abstract 
level. Because of these findings, manipulative materials 
are in use in mathematics classrooms. In order to support 
teachers in the use of these materials, workshops, in- 
service training sessions and individual consultation are 
being provided by the Mathematics Coordinator. 

As a result of the Metric Conversion Act signed into 
law on December 23, 1975. national conversion to the 
metric system of measurement has been mandated and 
has begun in many schools across the country. To ini- 
tiate planning in Chelmsford for this additional emphasis 
on the metric system, a brief elementary workshop was 
held during the summer of 1976. 

The introduction of the metric system in Chelmsford 
will be presented as part of a well-planned and co- 
ordinated program. Initially teacher workshops will be 
conducted to train teachers in the metric system and to 
familiarize them with the Scope and Sequence Chart of 
Metric Skills for grades K.-6. This curriculum guide is 
heavily based on research on measurement topics and 
instruction and also includes emphasis on other topics 
such as estimation and interdisciplinary studies. The 
initial implementation of the system will begin with the 
elementary schools. Because the metric system is merely 
one system of measurement which will eventually replace 
another system, many valuable opportunities are created 
by this gradual conversion to examine and study more 
general aspects of measurement. In this way. both 
systems will be considered while conversion is under way. 
but increased importance will be given to the metric 
system as conversion nears completion. In addition to 



teacher training workshops, plans are being made ft 
parent meetings in which the metric system will be pr< 
sented and discussed. 



Throughout the entire mathematics program, provi- 
sions are being made for children with varying abilities 
in mathematics. Various remedial programs which em- 
phasize basic understanding and skill acquisition are 
being used. For the most talented children, enrichment 
programs in various fields of mathematics are also being 
made available. In addition, assorted individualized 
programs are underway which enable children to explore 
mathematics at their own rate. 

At the secondary level, a great number of courses 
are offered so that the individual student has many 
options available in the area of mathematics. Both at 
the junior and senior high school levels, an increased 
effort is being made to recognize the individual needs of 
each particular child. Many new materials, textbooks, 
approaches and methods are being employed at these 
levels. 

At the junior high schools, the mathematics program 
has continued to provide numerous alternatives in course 
selection. Teaching units developed by the professional 
staff are being introduced and developed. There are 
varied patterns of classroom activities employed in the 
largely homogeneous classes. Various materials such as 
puzzles, games, projectors and math lab teaching equip- 
ment are being used to enhance all programs, including 
those of the enrichment and remedial levels. 

During the summer of 1976 a workship was held for 
the junior high schools during which all the materials 
for the remedial groups were reviewed, organized and 
expanded. A specific course sequence was developed and 
materials obtained that may be used either individually 
or in large group situations. 

In keeping with the increased national interest in Basic 
Skills, a Criterion Referenced Test of Basic Compu- 
tational Skills has been developed for use in the ninth 
grade. The foundation for this survey test was based on 
the National Assessment of Education Progress - Mathe- 
matics Assessment of 1972. The objectives of the Cri- 
terion Referenced Test for Chelmsford are to identify 
areas where students need computational reinforcement 
and to aid teachers in learning about the growth of 
skills and the nature of difficulties that may be present. 

In order to offer a mathematics program for each 
individual student at Chelmsford High School, there are 
many courses available which vary greatly in their con- 
tent. This offering includes three levels of Calculus, 
various levels of Advanced Mathematics, Algebra, Geo- 
metry, Basic Math, and an interdisciplinary course 
called Practical Living. Practical Living is the composite 
of many essential areas such as insurance, tax, banking, 
home improvement and money management which stu- 
dents will need to function more successfully in today's 
society. 

Extensive use is being made of the computer at 
Chelmsford High School. The basic programming course 
is a very popular course in the mathematics department. 
Other disciplines such as social studies and science also 
use the computer in their instructional program. The 



59 



computer room is currently supervised by an adult and 
is available to students both during and after the school 
day. In other activities of the mathematics department, 
the Math Team continues to bring glory to Chelmsford. 
During the most recent season, they finished second in 
New England. 

Mathematics is a way of thinking and also is an 
organized body of knowledge. The mathematics program 
in Chelmsford reflects this philosophy in that a conscious 
effort is being made to teach mathematical concepts, 
computational skills, and problem solving techniques. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF 
SOCIAL STUDIES 

I. Social Studies in Chelmsford 

A. Why 

As our nation's Bicentennial draws to a close, it seems 
appropriate in examining the why of social studies in 
Chelmsford to draw upon the time tested reasoning of 
Thomas Jefferson who said: 

"Above all things, I hope the education of the people 
will be attended to; convinced that on their good sense 
we may rely with the most security for the preservation 
of a due degree of liberty. In a Democracy citizenship 
must be an individual's chief vocation and preparation 
for that citizenship society's chief concern. 

It is an axiom in my mind that our liberty can never 
be safe but in the hands of the people themselves ... 
in the hands of the people who have a degree of instruc- 
tion. That is the business of the state to effect instruction 
and on a general plan. The qualifications for self- 
government are not innate. They are the result of habit 
and long training. If a nation expects to be ignorant 
and free, in a state of civilization, it expects what never 
was, and never will be." 

The intent of Jefferson and the founders of the United 
States of America was that the public schools should 
be the vehicle for the perpetuation to posterity of our 
system. A people committed to the ideal of government 
by the consent of the governed must insure the advance- 
ment of human dignity and commitment to the rational 
process if it is to continue. That is the purpose of 
social studies education: the development of informed 
citizens fully aware of the need for insuring the dignity 
and worth of the individual, for personal involvement 
in improving the society they have inherited, and for 
recognizing the interdependence of all peoples. In the 
largest sense, then, the goal of the Chelmsford social 
studies program is to prepare students for intelligent 
participation in a free society. 

It is recognized, however, that while the social studies 
program provides instruction in citizenship education, 
it is the responsibility of the total community - home, 
media, religion, business, labor and other sectors of the 
societv - to provide the laboratory for applying citizen- 
ship education experiences and for insisting that the 
young citizen participate in a responsible and intelligent 
manner. 

' B. What 



The social studies program in Chelmsford organizes 
the knowledge, skills, and traditions of history, geo- 
graphy, economics, sociology, anthropology, and poli- 
tical science into a unified program for the instruction 
of the young citizens in our schools. The program has 
identified important concepts and generalizations from 
the various social sciences and provides for sequential 
development of them in the curriculum. In addition to 
expository approaches this curriculum draws heavily 
upon the inquiry approach; that is, students are asked 
to identify or are given a problem, formulate hypotheses, 
gather data, and then test their hypotheses. The program 
is designed to develop curiosity about social data and 
respect for evidence even when it contradicts prejudices 
and preconceptions. The program also develops an 
appreciation and respect for the cultural contributions 
of other countries, races, religions: all of humankind. 

C. Where 

The following is a brief summary of the curricular 
framework of the program. 

Our Kindergarten program. The Earth as the Home 
of People, has a readiness focus and introduces children 
to the concepts and skills they will study in more detail 
in later grades. 

In grades one and two children use the context of 
the family to study families from different societies 
and make comparisons with their own in terms of roles, 
functions, socialization, and culture. In comparing a 
variety of peoples, children also discover universals and 
the psychic unity of humankind. 

At grades three and four the emphasis shifts to the 
community in terms of political and sociological concepts 
in grade three and with an economic emphasis in grade 
four. 

In a concentrated study of the United States as a 
whole in fifth grade students learn that people use their 
physical environment in terms of their perceptions, cul- 
tural values, and level of technology. Law-related and 
government concepts introduced in somewhat less formal 
terms at the primary level are expanded upon and 
correlated with the Constitution and branches of govern- 
ment. 

The sixth grade program applies the concepts learned 
earlier to a series of area studies. 

As the students begin their junior high school program 
at seventh grade, they learn some of the skills of the 
social scientist in examining what makes humankind 
human and how to relate social science concepts and 
skills to less developed societies. The final seventh grade 
unit traces the origins of American culture from the 
European explorers to the many other immigrant groups 
who have come to this country. 

With the stage set the eighth grade program examines 
the question what made America America by taking a 
chronological look at the history of the United States. 
The course is people oriented and looks at the people and 
events that shaped our nation. 

At the ninth grade level students turn to an analysis 
of what kept America America by examining our poli- 



60 



tical system. Students analyze political behavior of indivi- 
duals and small groups in and out of public office at 
the local, state, and national levels. 

The elective program at the high school level provides 
a more analytical examination of the experiences of 
humankind through the ages in terms of history, sociolo- 
gy, economics, and government. The program provides 
some alternative ways of analyzing the American exper- 
ience. It also provides students with the opportunity to 
examine more in depth the fields of law, economics, 
sociology, and psychology or, in an interdisciplinary 
fashion, Asian studies, art and architecture in America, 
women in today's society, and modern problems. 

D. How 

The Chelmsford program has been adapted from the 
work of several national curriculum projects, some now 
in commercially available form, as well as text and re- 
lated materials produced by national publishers. Some 
instructional management systems have been developed 
by our staff at summer workshops. Materials are selected 
that fulfill our objectives and meet the needs of our 
students. The primary program uses a wide variety of 
media, the intermediate and junior high school programs 
are more multi-text book oriented with related materials, 
while the high school program tends to use a major 
text with supplementary readings and other media. 
Again, the major factor in the selection of a particular 
book or other instructional medium being its relationship 
to our program's objectives. 

Just as science education makes heavy use of science 
labs, social studies education makes heavy use of social 
studies labs. However, as Thomas Jefferson seemed to 
suggest, the social studies laboratory is in the community. 
The research learning laboratory for the Chelmsford 
social studies program is the Town Hall, Old Chelms- 
ford Garrison House, Barrett-Byam Homestead, Little 
Red Schoolhouse, the fire station, the police station, 
House of Corrections, or District Court. At times it 
might include McDonald's, Demoulas', or Paramount 
Cleaners and might extend to Fruitlands Museum or 
the State House. Students often conduct field study in 
these laboratories as a whole class, in small groups, or 
on special individual projects. 

When possible and applicable the community is 
brought into the classroom as a resource so as the need 
arises you might find a member of the board of select- 
men or planning board explaining a function of town 
government, an elderly citizen sharing his or her ex- 
periences and the changes they've observed in Chelms- 
ford, or a retired whaling seaman describing life aboard 
the Charles W. Morgan. 

Teaching materials and techniques are selected care- 
fully to provide meaningful learning experiences so that 
both content and skills objectives can be realized and so 
that students will develop positive attitudes toward 
learning; attitudes, knowledge, and skills that they may 
then apply as citizens in the community. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF SCIENCE 

The Science Curriculum in the Chelmsford Public 
Schools is a well articulated program of inquiry and con- 
cept building throughout grades K-12. It is a flexible 
curriculum which uses multistimuli methodology en- 



couraging the active participation of the student in the 
learning process. 

The K-6 program is divided into physical science and 
life science content areas. A laboratory centered ap- 
proach combining content process and attitude is the 
hallmark of the elementary SCIS program. The scientific 
content is reinforced through exposure to scientific 
articles and readers designed for the elementary student. 
The science program at the sixth grade level has seen 
the inclusion of a unit dealing with the study of the 
northeastern environment. This unit on nature is de- 
signed to be used in conjunction with student's experience 
at Camp Kirkland or similar types of excursions. 

The secondary program continues the student's devel- 
opment by offering a comprehensive variety of specialized 
courses presenting an opportunity for all students to gain 
insights into the broad spectrum of science. 

Emphasis at the junior high levels has been placed on 
basic concepts and skill building. Ecology and environ- 
mental awareness are being explored at all levels of 
instruction. The programs at the junior high level recog- 
nize the individuality of the students and strengthen 
their conceptual ability. 

At the senior high level instruction is given in the major 
subject areas of biology, chemistry and physics. A wide 
range of elective courses are available to all students 
with advanced instruction being provided in biology and 
chemistry. Courses such as photography, clinical tech- 
niques, and anatomy offer exposure to career awareness 
as well as scientific facts and principles. The Advanced 
Chemisry program is highly individualized utilizing 
experimentation, research and evaluation. The use of 
modular scheduling has provided extended laboratory 
experiences for students in many elective courses. 

Throughout the Science Program we are attempting 
to evaluate the use of various learning styles and tech- 
niques to provide students optional modes of education. 
The goal of the Chelmsford Science Program is to 
educate the future students of science as well as the 
non-scientist for entrance into a technologically complex 
society whose employment patterns and requisite skills 
are constantly changing. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
PHYSICAL EDUCATION AND ATHLETICS 

A summer workshop was conducted by a number of 
physical education teachers in the system to develop a 
curriculum guide for grades kindergarten through 12. 

This curriculum gives us a coordinated program 
throughout the schools. It was implemented in the fall 
throughout Chelmsford. 

Chapter 622, the non-discrimination state law, also 
involved the schools in some changes. At the McFarlin 
school, classes are now coeducational in most activities 
with some being selective. 

The junior high schools, Parker and McCarthy, have 
also developed coeducational activities and are beginning 
to develop selective programs where the students have 
a choice of activities at different times of the year. 

The high school program is selective, with new activi- 



61 



ties being offered at different times of the year. Student 
interest, instructor expertise and the facilities determine 
our course offerings. 

Athletics 

For the first time in a number of years, no new varsity 
sports were added. However, we had an outstanding 
program this year in terms of participation, enthusiasm, 
and community support. 

The boys' basketball team, the baseball team, and the 
girls' volleyball team all went to the state tournaments. 
All three lost to the eventual state champion in each 
sport. The boys' track team beat Andover for the first 
time and won the Merrimack Valley Conference cham- 
pionship. 

The wrestling team won the sectionals and the state 
championship coach, Randy Whitehead, was named 
"Coach of the Year". Four members of the team were 
Division I State Champions and one was New England 
States' Champion. We are extremely proud of all our 
teams and the dedication of all the athletes and coaches. 

Intramurals 

Continued interest at McFarlin, Parker, and McCarthy 
by both boys and girls has made our programs at these 
schools among the best in the area. 

Soccer was introduced this year at the junior high 
schools with the expectation of varsity teams in the 
future. The turnout was good. There were over 50 boys 
in each school involved. 

At the high school level we had interest this past 
fall in girls' soccer and swimming. Clubs were formed 
in each sport and the participation was excellent. These 
sports will probably become varsity sports in the future. 

Recreation-Youth Programs-Boosters Club 

There has been continued growth in the recreation 
program and in the youth program in football, soccer, 
hockey, baseball, gymnastics, tennis, track and field, 
wrestling, and basketball. 

We have continued to cooperate and support all of 
these programs and our facilities are shared by all. 

The Boosters' Club has continued to provide an out- 
standing service to the schools, athletes, and coaches. 
Its activities include awards, jackets, trophies, parents' 
days, programs, special banners and other projects, and 
dances. We are happy that this organization is associated 
with our schools. A special thanks goes to its members 
and all parents who have supported our programs. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
FOREIGN LANGUAGES 

This year, Foreign Language enrollment at the high 
school increased by 128 students as compared to an 
increase of approximately 40 in total enrollment. This 
increase is occurring primarily in the upper "levels of 
languages as more and more students elect longer 
sequences of study. We believe the department's com- 
mitment to foreign language career education has con- 
tributed significantly to this rise in enrollments. In 



addition to classroom career education units and other 
efforts to link foreign language competence and job 
opportunity, the department is organizing Foreign 
Language Career Days. Under this concept, speakers 
from various professions and occupations will be invited 
to convey to the students the assets of a foreign language 
to any career. 

The department continued its elective program at the 
French IV level because of its apparent success in 
attracting students to continue language study. Students 
may elect such topics as French Culture and Cuisine, 
Advanced Conversations, French Art, Listening for 
Comprehension, and Taking a Look at French Canada. 

Finally, the department sponsors many extracurricular 
activities to maintain student motivation. This year a 
chapter of the Spanish Honor Society was organized to 
recognize achievement in Spanish study as its counter- 
part does for French. The French Club, already active 
in the high school, was joined by the new Spanish Club 
in organizing trips to restaurants, museums, and Canada. 
Spanish students are also continuing their work with 
Spanish bilingual students in Lowell. Our students relate 
to the Spanish pupils in such activities as sports, crafts, 
and games. This endeavor allows our students a practical 
opportunity to perfect their Spanish language skill while 
providing a community service. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
CAREER EDUCATION 

The Career Education Department of the Chelmsford 
School Department now comprises the departments of 
Career Education, Business Education, Home Econo- 
mics, Industrial Arts, and Distributive Education. The 
Work Experience program, which formerly was part of 
the Career Education Department is once again part 
of the Guidance Department. 

The Distributive Education program is a transfer pro- 
gram which was functioning at Nashoba Valley Tech- 
nical High School. It was the opinion of the school 
department that this program would complete one of the 
last recommendations from the evaluation of the high 
school, which was completed in 1972. 

Distributive Education is for those students who wish 
to prepare for possible futures in the fields of marketing, 
merchandizing, or management services. The technique 
used to implement this program is a cooperative effort 
between the school, the local distributive businesses and 
the community. The courses in Distributive Education 
are but another part of a student's total educational plan. 

The Distributive Education program currently has an 
enrollment of twenty-three (23) students. Each student 
attends a related Distributive Education class each day, 
as well as their required twenty hours a week of on- 
the-job training with a local business concern. 

The Business Department will be offering a third 
level of typing for the school year, 1977-1978. This 
typing course will be for those students who wish to 
increase their secretarial skills to include medical, legal, 
and executive-type secretarial skills. 

It is the opinion of the school administration that, 
with the implementation of the career program, which 
was started during the last two years at the junior high 



62 



school level, more students are now better able to make 
meaningful decisions concerning their selection to attend 
Nashoba Valley Technical High School. Our enrollment 
in this school is showing a steady increase. 

At both junior high schools this year, the Home 
Economics teachers have started teaching units within 
the regular Home-Economics curriculum classes which 
are geared for those students who are taking five sub- 
jects, but would rather take a sixth subject than have 
a study-hall. This opens their career options still further. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF ART 

This has been a very fruitful year for the Art De- 
partment with a bountiful harvest in evidence over town. 
There is an exceptional hooked rug with a Bicentennial 
theme adorning the lobby of South Row School, an 
ever-changing gallery of paintings surrounding the court- 
garden at Byam School, masks at McFarlin, optical 
illusions and spatial experiments abound at Center 
School. Constructionism has come to the fore at Mc- 
Carthy, while magnificent drawings grace the halls at 
Parker. Wherever we look, we see exciting projects 
representing hundreds of students who are creatively 
excelling. 

We are even more pleased for all those students and 
their successes that are not directly related to the art 
rooms in each school. We are pleased to see children 
making visual reports on the books they have read and 
having classroom teachers accept and appreciate these 
reports. We are thrilled to see some excellent charts and 
signs in the Science Fair and even more with the creative 
visual presentations that are implemented. We are proud 
of the scenery that students truly toiled over at the 
Harrington School for their play and equally proud of 
the dramatic backgrounds made at Parker for their 
Christmas Music Festival. We are happy to see so many 
creative Safety Posters in the Westland hallways. And, 
not the least, are we very pleased to see the great 
numbers of our students who take part in various com- 
munity activities, like making articles for church and 
school fairs and their involvement in events like the 
Fourth of July festivities. This kind of participation and 
the many skills involved are evidence that are very 
gratifying to us because we feel that our objectives are 
being attained. 

Our two critical objectives are: First, to make each 
student aware of the visual world in which he lives; and 
second, to make each student aware of his own skills 
and capabilities. These are broad and general objectives 
and to fully implement them requires committed atten- 
tion on the part of the whole staff. 

We attempt to achieve these objectives in a wide 
range of activities. We talk, we touch brick walls and 
feel their texture and learn about their history as well 
as their usefulness. We collect stones and marvel at their 
shapes and colors. We see art works from centuries 
past and worlds afar on film and slides and talk about 
them to try to understand them . . . for to understand 
the arts of people is to understand the people themselves. 
We talk about hair styles and shoes and graffiti on tee 
shirts. We try, in every way, to get our students involved 
with as many forms of design in our visual and sensory 
world as possible. We try to show the beauty of natural 
forms through understanding and appreciation. 



In a more academic sense, our educational plan is 
developed so that the goals and objectives for each grade 
level are steps to be built on in the following years, while 
at the same time dwelling on the growth and develop- 
ment of each child at each grade level. We try to give 
every student in our schools a total art experience by 
offering as many forms of media, ideas, and challenges 
as possible. 

There are still many hundreds of hours spent in 
painting, studying color, printmaking, lettering, perspec- 
tive, and in other more traditional art areas of concern 
and study. 

In summation, we feel that our students are offered 
a very broad scope of art education which can help each 
one develop more fully mentally, physically, and sen- 
sorally into more responsive and responsible citizens. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF MUSIC 

The purpose of music education in the public schools 
of Chelmsford is to assist students to appreciate, under- 
stand, participate, and respond with sensitivity to the 
aesthetic effect of music, according to their individual 
capacities. 

The Music Department is committed to excellence in 
music at all levels and strives to help students discover 
and develop their musical talents for better under- 
standing and enjoyment of all kinds of music. 

Each elementary school has a resident music specialist 
who is reponsible for all music education in the building, 
with the exception of instruction on band and orchestral 
instruments. Each school has weekly lessons in music 
along with a performing choral group. Most schools have 
song flute ensembles and/or recorder consorts. Some 
schools have guitar clubs, dance groups, and Orff bands. 

Our curriculum guide is based on the conceptual 
approach. We have a spiral curriculum that begins in 
kindergarten and continues through junior high school. 

Music in the junior high school is required of all 
seventh and eighth graders. Mini-courses are available 
to ninth graders on an elective basis. General music in 
seven and eight is basically designed for non-performing 
students and, for many, it is their last formal contact 
with school music. The elective music program for grade 
nine includes theory, group guitar and/or piano, and 
pop rock. Choral groups are available on an elective 
basis. 

The high school has course offerings for both perform- 
ing and non-performing students. A staff of two and one- 
third instructors offer courses in music appreciation, 
theory, guitar class, small and large vocal and instru- 
mental ensembles, instrumental instruction, and practice 
rooms for individual study. 

Instrumental music in our schools provides an ex- 
perience not found in other areas within the music 
department. Orchestral string instruments are offered 
starting in grade three, while all band and orchestral 
instruments are included from grades six through twelve. 
Every interested student has an opportunity to parti- 
cipate in small-group instruction during school time, and 
instrumental during school time, or after school as part 
of the extra-curricula program. 



63 



We have seen a declining student population with an 
increasing number of instrumental students, from 362 
in June of 1971 to 800 in 1977. 

Instrumental ensembles participate in school and 
community programs throughout the school year. 

FROM THE COORDINATOR OF THE 
INSTRUCTIONAL MEDIA CENTER 

The 1975-76 school year was an extremely busy one 
for the Chelmsford School library program. Acquisition 
and circulation figures attest to this fact. A total of 
164,698 books and other library materials circulated to 
students and teachers; a total of 18,216 books were 
cataloged and processed at the Media Center in the high 
school and shipped to the various school libraries in the 
town. Circulation figures do not represent the true 
picture of library usage, for there is a great deal of 
in-library use in addition. 

The instructional program continued to increase. In 
addition to the instruction given in previous years, a 
reference course was initiated at the McFarlin School. 

The volunteer parent program was continued at the 
elementary level, and the annual tea in honor of the 
parents participating was very well attended. Students 
at the two junior high schools gave very generously of 
their time, meanwhile learning about books and how a 
library operates. The high school initiated a student 
volunteer program. In all schools, the use of the libraries 
by teachers and their classes has continued to expand. 

The Graphic Artist-Media Production Specialist and 
the Media Aide continued to spend much time in schools 
throughout the system assisting both faculty and students 
in the preparation of curriculum-related media projects. 
In addition to production, the Media Center staff also 
deals with the cleaning and repairing of all 16 mm. films 
in the centralized film collection. 



FROM THE HIGH SCHOOL PRINCIPAL 

Nineteen seventy-six was another banner year for 
Chelmsford High School academically, athletically and 
socially. 

The House Plan continued to provide a more personal, 
effective and meaningful educational experience for 
staff and students. A College Entrance Examination 
Board Advanced Placement Program was initiated in 
Mathematics, with plans being formulated for additional 
Advanced Placement courses, and a Distributive Educa- 
tion course was added to the curriculum. In addition, 
the High School Principal has been elected to the 
C.E.E.B. Board of Directors for a term of five years. 

The staff and students were pleased to be able to hold 
the graduation for the Class of 1976 on its own school 
grounds. For the first time, the top five ranked students 
were named as Gold Medal Scholars. The Class of 1976 
was also honored by having one of its members named 
as a Presidential Scholar. 

Once again, our athletic teams brought honor to their 
school by excelling in conference competition and going 
on to State and New England competitions. Particularly 



successful were the Wrestling, Boys' Basketball, Baseball, 
Track and Volleyball teams. The Drama Club also 
continued its fine traditions by winning State honors. 

The Service Study Program, wherein the students are 
involved in service to the community, continued to 
excel as well as the student Blood Drive which produces 
over 200 pints of blood a year. 

The High School building won yet another honor, 
being selected for one of seven National Merit Awards 
for Design, awarded by the School Facilities Council 
of the American Association of School Business Officials. 

FROM THE PROGRAM SUPERVISOR OF 
GUIDANCE 

Following are pertinent facts and figures regarding 
last year's graduating class. Also included are figures 
combining statistics of Chelmsford High and Nashoba 
Tech which provide an overview of Chelmsford Public 
School graduates. 

Seventy-one percent of the Chelmsford High Class of 
1976 indicated post-secondary plans. This is a slight 
drop from the seventy-six percent of the Class of 1975. 

There is very little to note in the way of statistical 
change between this class and last year's class. There 
continued to be a relatively large number (34) indicating 
indecisiveness in their plans this year. There were 27 
last year, five and six percent respectively. 

PLANS OF TOP 50 STUDENTS -CLASS OF 1976 



Dartmouth College 
St. Anselm's College 
University of Mass. 
Rensselaer Polytechnic Inst. 
College of the Holy Cross 
University of Mass. 
University of Pennsylvania 
University of Lowell 
New England Deaconess Hosp. 
University of New Hampshire 
West Point Military Academy 
Mass. Institute of Tech. 
Memphis State University 
Wellesley College 
University of Lowell 
University of Maine 
University of Lowell 
Purdue University 
University of Lowell 
Rice University 
Mass. Inst, of Technology 
University of Lowell 
Penn. State or Univ. of Mass. 
Tufts L'niversitv 
University of Mass. 



Rank in Class 

26. Wore. Polytechnic Inst. 

27. Univ. of New Hampshire 

28. Merrimack College 

29. University of Mass. 

30. Boston College 

31. University of Lowell 

32. University of Mass. 

33. California Inst, of Tech. 

34. College of the Holy Cross 

35. University of Vermont 

36. University of Mass. 

37. University of Lowell 

38. Suffolk University 

39. Tufts University 

40. Boston College 

41. University of Lowell 

42. College of the Holy Cross 

43. University of Mass. 

44. Undecided 

45. University of Mass. 

46. Wore. Polytechnic Inst. 

47. Wore. Polytechnic Inst. 

48. University of Mass. 

49. Univ. of New Hampshire 

50. Northeastern University 



SUMMARY OF CAREER PLANS OF 
TOP 50 STUDENTS 



Engineering 8 

Education 7 

Mathematics 5 

Biology 5 

Undecided Majors 4 
Bus. Adm. Acct. 4 



Political Sci/Govt. 3 
Pre Med 2 

Chemistry 2 

Computer Science 2 

Physics 2 

Pre-Law 1 



Pre-Dentistry 
Pre-Vot 

Medical Tech. 
Registered Nurse 
Undecided 



64 



SURVEY-CHELMSFORD HIGH SCHOOL 
CLASS OF 1976 



Boys Girls Totals % 



4 year Private Colleges or out-of State 
•including 1 West Point (boy) 
•including 2 Nursing (girls) 

4 year Mass. State Col. /Univ. 
•including 5 Nursing (girls) 

Sub-Total - 4 Year Colleges/Univ. 

2 year Privatejunior Colleges 

2 year Mass. Community Colleges 

Sub-Total 2 year Colleges 

Other Post-Secondary- 
Registered Nurse 
Licenses Practical Nurse 
Tech. Schools (incl. non-degree Art, 

Wentworth. Hairdressing. etc.) 
Business Schools 
Prep. Schools 
CHS Post-Grad 
NashobaTech. Post-Grad 

Sub-Total Others 
Post-Secondary Total 

Employment 
Military Service 
Undecided 
Marriage 



ALL CHELMSFORD PUBLIC SECONDARY 

STUDENTS, CHELMSFORD HIGH & NASHOBA 

REGIONAL TECH. 

Total 

others (employment, military, etc.) 



13 


25 


38 


.07 


184 


241 


425 


.71 


48 


79 


127 


.21 


12 


3 


15 


.03 


17 


17 


34 


.047 




2 


2 


.003 


77 


101 


178 




261 


342 


603 


100? 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Srs.) 



Chelmsford High Seniors 
Nashoba (Chelmsford Srs. 



Total 










t-Secor 


idary 








425 


178 


= 


603 







71 


= 


71 




425 


249 




674 




.71 


.29) 











1.00) . 


:ombincd 


.63 



S.A.T SUMMARY STATISTICS ON THE CLASS OF 
1976 ARE AS FOLLOWS: 







Verbal 


Math 




Chelmsford Seniors 




432 


478 


481 


Greater-Boston Seniors 




433 


470 


35,075 


Mass. High School Seniors 




432 


469 


57,884 


New England High School Seniors 


435 


472 


117,149 


Nation-wide High School Sen 


lors 


431 


472 


999,776 



No. of students 

The Career and College Counseling Center at the 
High School is an active spot as witnessed by the large 
number of students who visit it daily. Similar efforts to 
establish Career Centers are well underway at the 
Parker and McCarthy Junior Highs. 

Additionally, at the Junior High Schools an effort is 



being made by counselors to stimulate careers and de 
cision making by field-trips, guest speakers and involve- 
ment in decision-making group sessions. 

Career Day 1976 held at Chelmsford High School was 
hailed as an outstanding success by speakers and students 
alike. Approximately 5000 students from 11 surrounding 
schools attended the session with 85 speakers representing 
over 80 different careers. The impetus for the Career 
Day has come from the Merrimack Valley Association 
of School Committees with strong commitment from the 
Lowell Chamber of Commerce and the sponsoring 
agencies: The Lowell Sun, Union National Bank and the 
Courier-Citizen Company. 

At this writing the Second Annual Career Day is 
planned for March 16th at the University of Lowell with 
12 area high schools sending their 11th graders. 

The Second Annual Regional College Day was held 
at Westford Academy on October 29, 1976, with over 400 
Chelmsford High School seniors joining other students 
from area schools in hearing from the fifty plus college 
representatives. This is likewise sponsored by the Merri- 
mack Valley Association of School Committees and is 
an annual event. 

During the past school year 115 students participated 
in the Work-Study program. Seventeen of these students 
were underclassmen and the other 98 were members of 
the graduating class. One-hundred and six received 
credit for their participation. 

In grateful recognition for long years of dedicated 
valuable service to the youth and citizens of the town, 
School Committee members, administration, colleagues, 
and citizens alike honored the retirement of the following 
employees: 

Dr. Benjamin Blechman, School Physician 
Mrs. Hilda Richardson, Teacher High School 
Mrs. Ruth Flitcroft, Teacher, Center School 
Mrs. M. Eileen Hood, Secretary, High School 

It is the sincere wish of the School Committee and 
Administration that the retirees may find the years ahead 
both satisfying and rewarding. To them goes our deep 
appreciation for having contributed so much to so many. 

Sincere thanks are once again extended to the town 
officials and boards, to the school personnel, to the 
Parent-Teacher Organizations, to advisory committees, 
and to the citizens for their cooperation and assistance 
this past year. 

The School Committee is most appreciative of the 
assistance rendered by the Chelmsford Jaycee-ettes when 
its members coordinated the efforts of local organiza- 
tions and citizens in sponsoring the Town-wide Preschool 
Screening Clinic on April 10, 1976. 

The School Committee wishes to promote increased 
citizen involvement in school task forces, Advisory Com- 
mittees, and other voluntary services and to strengthen 
communications among members of the educational 
community. 

The future holds considerable challenge for everyone 
concerned with the quality of education. Schools cannot 
solve all the problems facing communities. There must 



65 



be shared responsibilities with students, parents and 
administrators working together. With the commitment 
of Chelmsford school personnel, parents, students and 
citizens, one cannot help but feel a sense of confidence 
that Chelmsford can and will meet that challenge. The 
budget deliberations this year necessitated careful and 
thoughtful consideration of present and future programs, 
with constant concern for the taxpayers' burden. The 
budget recommended for the 1977-78 school year is con- 
tained in the Finance Committee's Annual Report. 



Alternate School Traffic Supervisors 

Irene Corsetti Jean B. MacPhail 

Nancy K. Fawcett Janet M. O'Connor 

Carol M. Souza 

Secretary 

Louise A. Pigeon 

Secretary 

Nora F. Clifford 



POLICE DEPARTMENT 

I herein respectfully submit for your information and 
review, the Annual Report of the Police Department 
for the Fiscal Year 1976. 

At the present time the department is made up of 48 
permanent men. 

Chief of Police 

Robert E. Germann 

Captain 

Richard E. Campbell 



Leslie A. Adams 
ArmandJ. Caron 
James C. Greska 



Sergeants 



Walter E. Edwards Jr. 

Pennryn D. Fitts 

William R. McAllister 



Raymond P. McKeon 



Richard A. Adams 
Edward L. Auger 
John J. Bell 
Mark L. Burlamachi 
Steve A. Burns 
John P. Campbell 
Lance R. Cunningham 
Patrick W. Daley 
Frederick C. Dillon 
John J. Donovan 
Kenneth R. Duane 
Blair J. Finnegan 
Barnard L. George 
Charles H. Hadley 
John G. Harrington 
Charles D. Harvey 
Edwin P. Hodgson 
James J. Kerrigan 
Ronald A. Leach 



Patrolmen 

Roland E. Linstad 

Russell H. Linstad 

JohnJ. Mack Jr. 

Raymond G. McCuskerJr. 

Henry R. McEnany 

James F. Midgley 

Philip N. Molleur 

Thomas A. Niemaszyk 

John E. Redicanjr. 

Edward C. Rooney 

Richard A. Simpson 

John B . Sousa 

William H. Strobeljr. 

Robert J. Trudel 

Howard R. Ubele 

Daniel J. Walsh 

Eugene W. Walsh 

John C.Walsh 

William R. Walsh 



Intermittent Patrolmen 

Francis W. Ahearn Gary W. McCarthy 

Lloyd E. Butt Timothy F. O'Connor 

Bruce A. Darwin Robert Popplewell 

Edward M. Rooney Ernest R. Woessner Jr. 



Grace Auger 
Mary Long 



Police Matrons 



Nora Clifford 
Emily Peake 



Permanent School Traffic Supervisors 

Grace Auger George Johnson 

Helen Chafe James Morrison 

Joan Dillon Halvar Peterson 

Karen Flynn Diane Zebney 



Auxiliary Police Department 

During 1976, the Chelmsford Auxiliary Police served 
the town on twelve occasions. These included the various 
Bicentennial celebrations, parades, Elks Road Race and 
Halloween. 

This year the Vacation House Check Program was 
upgraded into a year round program and expanded into 
a limited patrol function. 

Since the inception of this new program 3477 house 
checks have been made and 9000 miles have been 
logged on patrol. This program started March 1, 1976. 
The men of the Auxiliary have manned their cruiser 
on 100 nights to help make the program successful. 

Numerous training exercises and drills were conducted 
to improve and upgrade the performance and capa- 
bilities of the auxiliary unit. 

The work projects for 1976 included rebuilding three 
large electrical generators, two of which provide electri- 
cal power for the Town Hall and the Highway Garage. 
Other projects included maintenance of the vehicles 
and the completion of both vehicles. 

Total Man Hours for 1976 are 6631, broken down 
into 2701 duty, 2500 training and drill and 830 on 
work projects. 

Director - Sgt. Walter W. Edwards Jr. 
Coordinator - Sgt. Basil Larkin (Ret.) 



Roster 



Emil Aberizk 
Robert Abreu 
Lloyd Anstey 
Ken Berger 
Craig Brigham 
George Brown 
Allen Curseaden 
John Daughraty 
Paul Dean 
Douglas Drobnis 
Leroy Fielding 
Leo Flanagan 
Roger Gregoire 



Paul Villare 



Arrests 



John Hartnett 

William Keenan 

Leland Kelly 

Bob Loyd 

Frederic Mehan 

Edward Norton 

Bruce Pemberton 

Thomas Peterson 

James Quinn 

David Ramsay 

Nicholas Stratis 

Raymond Tremblay 

Clifford Varnum 



1975 



1976 



Crimes Against Person 
Crimes Against Property 
Crimes Against Public Order 



45 


199 


91 


163 


,416 


1,499 



66 



Disposition of Cases 1976 

Fined 

Placed on Probation 

Suspended Sentence and Placed on Probation 

Placed on File 

Not Guilty Finding 

Dismissed-With Probable Cause Found for Arrest 

Ordered to Pay Court Costs and Continued Without 

A Finding 
Committed to Youth Service Board 
Committed to M.C.I. Walpole 
Committed to M.C.I. Concord 
Committed to M.C.I. Billerica 
Turned over to out of town Police Departments 

and Courts 
Cases continued without a finding 
Placed on Alcohol Safety Program 
Ordered to pay restitution 
Deferred Sentences 
Cases Pending and Continued in the Courts 



Miscellaneous Statistics 



1975 



894 
35 
32 
67 
19 
62 

157 
6 
1 
2 
6 

85 
71 
99 
3 
16 
306 



1976 



Calls Answered by Cruisers 
Summons Served 
Licenses Suspended 
Accidents Reported 

Personal Injuries Reported 

Fatal Accidents 
Mileage of Cruisers 
Special Property Checks 
Station Lockups 
Citations Issued 
Parking Violations 
Doors and Windows found open 
Detoxification Unit 



12,309 


12,361 


1,409 


1,353 


149 


75 


1,030 


1,133 


351 


347 


5 


7 


517,652 


511,282 


2,906 


3,477 


431 


888 


1,985 


1,953 


565 


366 


243 


306 


415 


507 



Receipts Turned Over to Town 

1975 1976 



Photocopying Machine 


$1,898.00 


$2,498.00 


Firearm Permits 


2,940.00 


794.00 


Bicycle Registrations 


48.25 


25.75 


Firearm Identification Cards 


2,030.00 


660.00 


Court Fines 


2,852.00 


2,857.00 


Photographs 


506.00 


148.00 


Detail Account Service Charge 


4,050.81 


4,202.00 



Education and Training are still very important 
within our department. At this time we have men 
attending the following. 



This year, as you can see by our personnel roster, 
more School Traffic Supervisors and Alternate Super- 
visors have been added to our department. School 
Traffic Safety is very important to us. The addition of 
more Supervisors will give much added safety to our 
school children in crossing our many busy streets. 

Also this year, a new position was established in 
Lowell District Court. Sgt. Walter E. Edwards Jr. of 
our department was appointed Court Prosecutor for the 
Town of Chelmsford. Many of the towns in the area 
also established this position in their departments in 
the past year. The number of cases going into the 
Lowell District Court system from Chelmsford Police 
Officers is increasing every year. Having our own prose- 
cutor in the Court makes it much easier for the men to 
bring their cases forward faster and more thoroughly, 
as they are working with one of their own Superior 
Officers. 

On the first of September of this year the Chelms- 
ford Police Department, transferred their radio traffic 
over to a new system. This is the new Ultra -High 
Intercity Radio System. This system gives us radio con- 
tact with many other Police Departments, both from 
our station and in our mobile units by simply switching 
to another frequency. Therefore we have more efficient 
and much speedier contact with other Police Depart- 
ments. 

This year, 1976, while patrolling the highways and 
roads of our town, the mobile units covered 511,282 
miles in our cruisers. 

At this time we would like to express our thanks and 
appreciation to the Bournival Chrysler Plymouth Co. 
of Lowell for the donation of our safety car. Our 
Safety Program is very important to us and we will 
continue to keep it important. 

In conclusion, I would like to offer my sincere appre- 
ciation and thanks to the various officials and depart- 
ment heads, the Captain, the Sergeants, the Patrolmen 
and the citizens of the town for their continued help 
and co-operation. Because of their combined efforts 
I am sure Chelmsford is a safer place in which to 
work and live. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Robert E. Germann 
Chief of Police 



Northeastern University 
Middlesex Community College 
Lowell University 
Northern Essex 



4 Men 
3 Men 
1 Man 
1 Man 



Other Training Courses that our men attended in 1976 

Emergency Medical Technician Training Course 5 Men 

NEMLEC Police Academy 3 Men 
Criminal Justice Training Council on 

Motor Vehicle Law 3 Men 

F.B.I. Firearm Instructor Training School 1 Man 

Attorney Generals Economic Crime Program 2 Men 

F.B.I. Uniform Crime Reporting School 3 Men 
Attorney General 59th Drug Abuse 

Education Course 1 Man 



67 



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68 



CIVIL DEFENSE COMMITTEE 

Walter R. Hedlund, Director 

Christos A. Alexion William W. Edge 

George J. Brown Walter W. Edwards 

Melvin P. Dejager Joseph E. Stavely 

George R. Dixon 

The Civil Defense Committee, has been meeting re- 
gularly on the second Tuesday of each month, has 
completed all necessary papers for the State and Federal 
Civil Defense Agencies, making the town eligible for 
Surplus Property at the Taunton Surplus Property Depot. 

The Emergency Operating Center in Town Hall was 
manned in anticipation of the arrival of Hurricane 
"Belle" on Monday, August 9th for over 19 hours, 
following a State of Emergency declared by the Board 
of Selectmen, all department heads and personnel are 
to be complimented for their excellent response and 
cooperation. 

The Auxiliary Police have been active, assisting the 
Police Department at the various Bicentennial celebra- 
tions throughout the year, the Vacation House Check 
Program now on a year round basis, rebuilding surplus 
electrical generators for emergency power at Town Hall 
and the Highway Garage. 

The Communications Center has participated in the 
monthly drills with Mass. C. D. Headquarters Area 1 
in Tewksbury and other Towns Civil Defense Head- 
quarters. 

We wish to thank the Board of Selectmen, Ad- 
ministrative Assistant, various departments in the town 
for the fine cooperation received this past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund. Director 



FIRE DEPARTMENT 

I hereby submit my report of the Fire Department 
for the year ending December 31, 1976. 

With the opening of a new fire station in the east 
section, the fire department has completed its expansion 
program which began in 1952. Construction of stations 
were made at five year intervals (North, South, West) 
and each station is permanently manned with modern 
equipment. We feel that the manpower level now ob- 
tained shall remain the same for several years to come. 
We plan to continue our present policy of purchasing 
a fire engine every five years. Money is set aside each 
year for this purpose. 

The Town of Chelmsford, through a survey con- 
ducted by the Insurance Service Office of Massachusetts, 
has a Grade "B" rating. This rating is as high as 
any town in the Commonwealth. 

This year the fire department has requested that 
the ladder truck be repowered with a new diesel engine 
as this will add 15 years or more to the life of this vehicle. 

I wish to express my thanks to all town officials and 



employees for the excellent cooperation given to the 
fire department during the past year, and again like 
to congratulate and thank the men of the department 
for continuing to maintain the high standard of courage 
and ability that has been shown in the past. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frederick H. Reid 
Fire Chief 



Fire Chief 

Frederick H. Reid 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward G. Quinn 

Captains 

William H. Thayer Charles S. Galloway, Jr. 

Allen C. Mello James M. Spinney 

Robert C. Spaulding (Retired 7/8/76) 

Clerk 

Mary Ann Koulas 



Thomas P. Miskell 
Arthur G. Anderson 
Bertrand E. Dixon, Jr. 
Charles Ferreira 
Edward G. McGovern 
Robert K. Adams 
Alvin F. Wetmore 
Jack D. Hadley 
Harvey M. Miller 
Robert A. Bennett 
Robert R. Gagnon 
Harold J. Pierce, Jr. 
Donald A. Weber 
Paul D. Henderson 
Peter T. Wetherbee 
FrancisJ. Conlin 
Donald A. Drew 
James T. Cutter 
Gerald D. Tonks 
Richard P. O'Neil 
Robert L. Hughes 
Thomas J. Curran 
James P. Flaherty 
Joseph F. Lynch 
Paul D. Hayes 
Terrance A. Goode 
William H. Hadley 
Leo A. Martin 



Privates 

Emil R. Magiera 

Philip Dube 

RonaldJ. Sawicki 

Joseph E. Staveley 

(Ret. 10/30) John P. DePalma 

Walter F. Adley.Jr. 

Dennis Vargeletis 

Michael A. Blazonis (Resigned) 

Richard L. Grenon 

Ronald L.Johnson 

Wallace V. Maybury.Jr. 

William V. Cadyjr. 

Ronald O. Wikander 

James A. Sousa 

William F. Curran 

Daniel T. Reid 

Joseph J. Spinazola 

Michael McTeague 

Ernest J. Frobese 

James P. Curran 

Charles A. Schramm 

Peter G.Johnson 

William M. Burke, Jr. 

EdwardJ. Nolet 

Michael F. Curran 

Michael D. Ridlon 

William H. Jamer 

Raymond R. Kydd 



69 



CALLS FOR ASSISTANCE IN 1976 



Accidents 2 2 

Brush 1 15 

Building 14 13 

Dump 

False Alarm Malicious 2 

False Alarm Accidental 10 4 



44 
12 



61 17 36 25 

10 8 8 7 

10 



10 6 





21 30 
7 11 



8 12 



Total: 



80 72 116 153 84 98 98 72 69 84 98 



10 



83 



43 

264 

116 

3 

60 

44 



Misc. 


30 


7 


25 


35 


21 


22 


27 


17 


15 


15 


27 


20 


261 


Lock Out 





2 


2 


3 





1 


1 


2 














11 


1st Aid 


1 


2 





2 


1 





6 


4 


3 


1 


2 


3 


25 


Mutual Aid 





2 





7 


2 





1 


2 





2 


2 


5 


23 


Resuscitator 


10 


17 


10 


13 


14 


10 


7 


15 


15 


15 


8 


12 


146 


Vehicle 


10 


8 


9 


12 


12 


8 


12 


8 


11 


6 


9 


6 


111 




— 































1107 



EAST CHELMSFORD FIRE STATION 
BUILDING COMMITTEE 



Frederick Reid 
Fire Chief 
George Dixon 



Walter Hedlund, Chairman 



Edward Quinn 

Deputy Fire Chief 

Edward Hoyt, Secretary 



The above committee and the Board of Selectmen 
met December 29, 1975, and signed a contract for 
the construction of this station. It was expected at the 
time that the building would be completed by the fall 
of 1976. Unavoidable delays in the delivery of some 
of the special equipment needed in the repair area of 
the building held up construction of the rest of the 



building beyond the expected date of completion. 

The station was finally occupied and manned as of 
January 12, 1977. The long continued spell of cold 
weather in the fall and the snows which followed pre- 
vented the application of the final top coating of the 
driveway and area surrounding the building. As this 
is a part of the contract which can not be completed 
until warmer weather, formal acceptance of the station 
will be delayed until then. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter H. Hedlund 
Chairman 





70 



HIGHWAY DEPARTMENT 

The following is a report of the Highway Department 
for the year 1976: 



Year 

1955 
1966 
1976 



No. Reg. H'way 
Employees 

.21 
27 
37 



No. Reg. Waste 
Col. Employees 

3 

13 
16 



Three new streets were accepted in 1976. 

The recycling program that was implemented by the 
Highway Department has continued. Papers are collected 
on a monthly basis. 

Drainage projects include the following: 

Acton Road - 300 feet 12" R.C.Pipe(near Brush Hill Rd.) 

Colonial Drive - 80 feet 12" R.C. Pipe, one catch basin 

installed. 

Sherman Street - 28 feet 12" steel pipe, one catch basin 

installed. 

Locke Road - 56 feet 12" asphalt coated pipe. 

Frank Street - 240 feet R.C. pipe, 361 feet 12" asphalt 

coated pipe, five catch basins installed. 

Brian Road - 100 feet 8" asphalt coated perforated 

pipe, one catch basin installed. 

Dalton Road - 95 feet 10" corrugated pipe, one catch 

basin installed. 

Bartlett Street - 135 feet 12" aluminum pipe, one catch 

basin installed. 

Coolidge Street - 23 feet 8" corrugated pipe, one catch 

basin installed. 

Riverneck Road - 128 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 26 feet 12" 

aluminum pipe, 4 catch basins installed. 

Biscayne Drive - 240 feet 30" R.C. pipe installed. 

Spring Clean Up Days were conducted during the week 
of May 3 through May 7 and the Fall Clean Up Days 
were conducted during the week of October 4 through 
October 8. 

In September, the waste collection contract with the 
City of Lowell was terminated. The town is now using 
the Swain Road facility for the disposal of rubbish. 

Sidewalks were installed on Groton Road and North 
Road. The North Road sidewalks will be completed in 
the Spring. 

New equipment purchased for the Highway Depart- 
ment are as follows: One Dump Truck; One Truck 
Chassis; One Pickup Truck. 

The Chapter 90 Construction project was continued 
on Acton Road. Three hundred forty three feet of 
asphalt coated pipe, 36 feet 12" R.C. pipe, 7 catch 
basins and 4 manholes were installed. The roadway 
was excavated for a distance of 2000 feet and an average 
of 12" of gravel was added to the sub-base. A 3" black 
base course was placed over the gravel and an 1V4" 
bituminous concrete binder course was placed upon the 
black base. The shoulders of the roadway were rough 
graded and will be completed in the Spring. Also in 



the Spring, drainage structure castings will be adjusted 
to meet grade and a bituminous concrete top course 
will be placed over the binder course. The shoulders 
of the roadway and lawns will be loamed and seeded. 
The sidewalks in that area will be completed. 

The usual oiling of streets, including mix-in-places, 
brush cutting, fabricating, replacing and installing 
street signs, painting traffic lines, cleaning catch basins, 
rebuilding and repairing sunken catch basins, sanding, 
snow plowing and snow removal, sweeping streets, 
drainage and general maintenance was performed 
throughout the year. 

I wish to thank the townspeople for their kind con- 
sideration and cooperation and the Police Department 
for notifying the department of dangerous road con- 
ditions during the winter months. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Louis Rondeau 
Supt. of Streets 



HEALTH DEPARTMENT 

Board of Health 

Paul J. Canniff, D.M.D., Chairman 
Paul F. McCarthy Peter Dulchinos 

Health Department Personnel 

Director of Public Health Senior Clerk 

Thomas W. Morris, R.S. Jean Livermore 

Board of Health Physician 

Michael A. Gilchrist, M.D. 

Plumbing Inspector, Civil Service 

William H. Shedd 

Permanent Intermittent Plumbing Inspector 
Civil Service 

Richard M. Kelly 

Water Pollution Control 

In 1976 the water pollution control program continued 
its effort to clean up the streams. Numerous complaints 
were filed in District Court, several of which have 
been continued to 1977. 

The Board performed 27 dye tests and issued 111 
permits to repair septic systems in addition to issuing 
76 permits for construction of new systems. 

Administration and Management 

Income for various services and permits is listed below: 



Percolation tests - 176 
Testing paint for lead content - 9 
Hot water permits - 67 
Plumbing permits - 76 
Sewage permits - 187 
Miscellaneous licenses & fees 
Amount received for 1976 



$ 2,640.00 

285.00 

335.00 

715.00 

1,870.00 

16,593.00 

$22,438.00 



71 



Rabies Clinic 

Administered by Martin Gruber, D.V.M., a total of 
1090 dogs were innoculated against rabies. 

Public Health 

During 1976 the usual activities of the public health 
nurse in the areas of maternal-child health and com- 
municable disease control and investigation were carried 
out. 

Duties in the area of communicable disease control 
include follow-up investigation of hepatitis, salmonella, 
encephalitis and meningitis, also the development and 
implementation of immunization programs. 

The Town Nurse rendered home visits and completed 
investigations and reports for the Regional Health Office 
on the following diseases: 



Salmonella 
Meningitis 
Encephalitis 
Hepatitis 

Pre-School Immunization Program: 



2 cases 
1 case 
1 case 

8 cases 



In the spring three immunization clinics for pre-school 
age children were held. Immunization against measles, 
rubella, mumps, whooping cough, diptheria and tetanus 
were given to 26 children. 

School Immunization Program: 

In the spring immunizations were offered to kinder- 
garten and first grade, and also to junior and senior 
high school students. The following immunizations were 
given: 



Primary School 



High School 



TD = 25 
MMR = 68 
Polio = 40 

TD = 250 



Flu Immunization Program: 

Traditionally the town flu clinics have been for senior 
citizens and high risk adults only. This year the clinics 
were for all adults and also for high risk children as 
mandated by the Federal Government. 

In all there were three town wide clinics. Dr. 
Gilchrist, Town Physician, participated in the clinics. 
The total number of persons immunized at the clinics 
was 2,365. The Public Health Nurse also made home 
visits to shut-ins when requested by physicians. 

Material- Child Health Program: 

There were six premature infants reported to the 
Board of Health in 1976. The Public Health Nurse 
made home visits to these families for support and 
instruction and to advise of the resources available 
within the community. 



The Public Health Nurse made arrangements with the 
nursery schools in the community to have children 
tested for lead poisoning. CTI performed the actual 
testing of the children. There were 80 children tested. 

Tuberculosis Control: 

Mantoux testing is available at the Board of Health 
for town residents. There were 45 tests given this year. 

Duties of the Town Nurse in tuberculosis control 
include skin testing of nursing homes and school per- 
sonnel and referral to the Lowell Chest Clinic when 
indicated. 

Also home visits to test family contacts of active 
cases and to assure proper medical follow-up for medi- 
cation and chest x-rays. There was one new case of 
active tuberculosis this year. 



BOARD OF ASSESSORS 

The year 1976 has seen a decline in building activity 
by an overall decrease in building permits from 369 in 
1975 to 297 in 1976. New dwellings totalled 76, addi- 
tions 80, polls 42, remodeling and alterations 62 and 
miscellaneous 37. This would indicate that in all proba- 
bility, a net increase in total value will not meet 1975 
figures; an important factor relevant to arriving at a 
new tax rate. 

After ten years of service to the Town of Chelmsford, 
Richard L. Monahan retired from the Board of Assessors 
and was replaced by the appointment of Mrs. Ruth 
Delaney to fill his unexpired term. We wish Mr. 
Monahan a happy and healthy retirement. 

Throughout the year Janet Lombard, Assessor, and 
Gail Minns, Assistant Assessor, have completed various 
courses, attempting to further their knowledge of the 
Assessing field. Miss Lombard successfully completed two 
courses given by the International Association of Assess- 
ing Officers and both Miss Lombard and Mrs. Minns 
successfully passed exams in Property Tax Law, Assess- 
ment Administration and were awarded designations 
by the Massachusetts Assessors Associatioin as "Massa- 
chusetts Accredited Assessors". Miss Lombard also was 
honored by being appointed Chairperson of a state 
organized "Computer Study Committee" which hope- 
fully will aid Assessors in maintaining fair cash value 
of all real property. 

Motor vehicle excise taxes continue to be a year-round 
task for the clerical staff and we hope that every effort 
is being made to aid the taxpayer in problems relating 
to this tax. In the recapitulation of receipts in this 
report, a good look at the importance of excise tax 
revenue justifies the many frustrations in the administra- 
tion and collection of this tax. 

The Board of Assessors will continue to strive for 
better service to the community through experience 
and knowledge of their profession. 



Lead Poisoning Screening Clinics: 



72 




Motor Vehicle Excise 
Excise Tax Abatements 
Real Estate Tax 
R.E. Tax Omitted Assessment 
Personal Property Tax 
Number of Dwellings 

STATUTORY EXEMPTIONS 



Type 

Clause 41, Elderly 
Clause 22, Veterans 
Clause 37, Blind 
Clause 17,18 Widow, Age 

Financial Condition 
Real Estate Abatements 



Number Issued 


22,756 


Total Tax 


$ 1,210.097.07 


Number Granted 


4,374 


Amount 


141,684.69 


Assessments 


9,679 


Value 


260,617,615.00 


Assessments 


4 


Value 


105,650.00 


Assessments 


627 


Value 


9,967,600.00 


8660 










Number 




Tax Abated 




216 




$75,018.93 




533 




94,287.16 




13 




5,687.50 



29,957.98 
29,054.26 



RECAPITULATION 



Tax Title & Court Judgement 
Town Appropriations, Charges & Offsets 
State Assessments 
County Tax & Hospital 
Overlay Account 
Gross Amount to be Raised 



$ 11,671.48 

21,110,292.21 

194,730.47 

536,684.12 

241,731.18 



$22,095,109.46 



Revenue Derived from Excise Tax 

and Departmental Receipts 
Total from State (Cherry Sheet) 
Transfers from Available Funds 
Available Funds to Reduce Rate 
Total Receipts and Available Funds 



1,577,518.00 

6,447,789.01 

812,432.54 

878,083.00 



9,715,822.55 



Total Amount to be Raised by Taxation 



$12,379,286.91 



Fiscal 77 Tax Rate 
Fiscal 76 Tax Rate 
Fiscal 75 Tax Rate 



$45.75/1000 Valuation 
$41.50/1000 Valuation 
$39.00/1000 Valuation 



Respectfully submitted, 
BOARD OF ASSESSORS 



Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Janet Lombard 

Ruth Delaney 



73 



PLANNING BOARD 

Mr. A. Robert Raab, Mr. Eugene E. Gilet 

Chairman Mr. Stephen D. Wojcik 

Mr. Thomas E. Firth, Jr., - Mrs. AnnH. McCarthy 

Vice Chairman Mrs. Carolyn J. Fenn 

Mr. Henrick R.Johnson, Jr., Clerk 

This year has been one of great change for the Plan- 
ning Board. Two new members were elected last April, 
new engineering and planning consultants were selected, 
a new Board chairman was elected, a new procedure 
for the conduct of regular meetings was adopted, and 
regularly scheduled meetings set aside for planning con- 
siderations have evolved. All of these changes have 
developed during a year of high Board activity, with 
numerous applications for subdivision approval under 
consideration, and with most meetings well attended 
and lasting into the early morning hours. 

Mrs. Carolyn J. Fenn and Mr. Henrick R. Johnson, 
Jr. were elected to three-year terms on the Board, 
replacing Mr. Peter J. McHugh and Mr. Thomas A. 
Ennis, both of whom retired at the end of their terms. 
Mrs. Fenn's and Mr. Johnson's terms are the first 
three-year terms as a result of special legislation in 
response to Town Meeting action in 1974. 

Mr. Stephen D. Wojcik declined nomination for re- 
election as Chairman of the Board, citing the increased 
demands upon his time, and Mr. A. Robert Raab was 
nominated and elected unopposed. Mrs. Nancy D. 
Maynard resigned after serving as Recording Clerk for 
seventeen years, and Mrs. Judith E. Carter was appointed 
as her replacement. 

Town Engineering Associates of Acton was formally 
hired by the Board of Selectmen, upon the recommen- 
dation of a joint Planning Board/Selectmen committee 
formed to review all applications, to serve as engineering 
consultant to the Planning Board. TEA will conduct 
all site inspections and review all engineering plans 
submitted to the Board, and will advise the Board on 
all related items. 

Philip B. Herr Associates was hired by the Board 
to serve as planning consultant. Its initial duties center 
upon the continuation and completion of re-drafting 
up-dated zoning by-laws and the development of a new 
zoning map for the Town. Mr. Herr's firm previously 
completed the HUD-funded study administered by the 
State Department of Community Affairs to generate 
guidelines for the evaluation by the Board of major 
development proposals and to evaluate the proposal for 
a regional shopping mall in the vicinity of the Drum 
Hill rotary developed by private interests. 

A new agenda procedure for the conduct of regular 
meetings, which had been tested for some months on 
an interim basis, was formally adopted by the Board. 
This procedure eliminates the informal, walk-in manner 
in which business was conducted previously, and replaces 
it with scheduled appointments which are posted two 
days in advance of each meeting so that all interested 
parties can arrange to attend if they wish. All indica- 
tions are that this new procedure is working well. 

The Board has continued its efforts to update the 
master plan and to revise the zoning by-laws and zoning 
map. Special meetings for planning purposes have been 



and continue to be held between regular meetings so 
that due consideration can be given to these matters. 
The Board expects to submit one or more articles for 
inclusion in the warrant for the 1977 Annual Town 
Meeting which will represent the first of its recommenda- 
tions. 

In summary, this has been a productive year, with 
much more work still in front of us. 

Respectfully submitted, 

A. Robert Raab, Chairman 



DEPARTMENT OF VETERANS' 
SERVICES 

The volume of work in the department as well as 
the case load has increased considerably during 1976. 
The illness of veterans, unemployment, labor disputes 
etc., have all been contributing factors in the high 
cost of Veterans Benefits for the year. 

VETERANS' BENEFITS 

For the period January 1, 1976, through December 
31, 1976, the department handled a total of 775 cases. 
In July of 1976, all recipients on our rolls who were 
eligible for Social Security benefits received a 6.4% 



Cash and Material Grants Account 



Month 

January 

February 

March 

April 

May 

June 

July 

August 
September 
October 
November 
December 
Total: 



Expended 

% 4,360.63 
8,404.22 
5,243.29 
6,693.02 
7,994.97 
12,235.53 
5,576.44 
5,814.75 
7,862.89 
4,990.49 
11,041.59 
8,405.97 

188,623.79 



VETERANS' SERVICES 



In addition to the administration of financial assist- 
ance to our recipients, the department also renders 
veterans services to our veterans and their dependents. 



To: 

Jamaica Plain, V.A. 

West Roxbury 

Bedford, V.A. 

Brocton 

Total: 



22 
16 
48 
13 
99 



The department works in conjunction with the V.A. 
and Social Security Office to obtain benefits for our 
recipients who are eligible for benefits. This reduces 
the amount of benefits which this department must 
pay to individual cases. An accounting is kept on all 
benefits derived from other sources. 

74 



Benefits from : 

Veterans Administration = 

Social Security = 

Total: 



$ 98,121.00 
62,000.00 

$160,121.00 



Applicants may wish to forward thier requests to their 
Precinct member of the Committee. We list the names 
of each member as follows: 



I wish to acknowledge the cooperation that we received 
from the Commissioner of Veterans' Services and his 
staff and the Veterans Administration Regional Office 
in Boston. Only through their cooperation are we able 
to give our veterans and their dependents the services 
and assistance they are eligible to receive. 

To the various departments and agencies that assist 
us through the year, our most sincere thanks and gra- 
titude. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Mary K. McAuliffe 
Veterans' Agent 

VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND 
COMMITTEE 

The year 1976 was a quiet year for the Veterans' 
Emergency Fund Committee. No applications were 
received from veterans of World War II for assistance. 
Veterans are reminded that all applications are at first 
reviewed by the town's Veterans' Agent to determine 
if the town is able to assist under the Veterans' Bene- 
fits Program. In the event that further needs are 
established, the application is then forwarded to this 
committee to decide what, and if any assistance should 
be granted. Assistance is usually in the form of material 
grants. 



Precinct 1 : 
Precinct 2: 
Precinct 3 : 
Precinct 4: 
Precinct 5: 
Precinct 6 : 
Precinct 7 : 
Precinct 8: 
Precinct 9: 
Precinct 10 
Precinct 1 1 
Precinct 12 



Dr. Albert W.Willis 
Victor W. Fetro 
JamesJ. Walker 
John J. McNulty 
George F. Waite 
Alfred H. Coburn 
Thomas A. Ennis 
Dr. Kenneth A. Cooke 
Peter J. Saulis 
Melvin P. Dejager 
Herbert T. Knutsen 
Gerard A. Vayo 



During the calendar year of 1976 the fund's assets 
increased by $346.36 from bank dividends and interest. 
A separate and complete financial statement has been 
prepared for the year 1976 and appears elsewhere in 
this Annual Town Report. 

Respectfully yours, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD 
VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE, by 

Alfred H. Coburn, 
Chairman 



Treasurer's Report to the Board of Selectmen 

January 1st, 1976 to December 31, 1976 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 

Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1976: J6.336.54 

Add Receipts: 

The Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 

Interest $207.00 

The First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. 

Dividends $139.36 

Total Receipts $ 346.36 

Total of Balance on Hand as of January 1st, 1 976 and 

Receipts $6,682.90 

Deduct Disbursements None 

Balance on Hand as of December 31st, 1976: $6,682.90 

ASSETS 



Central Savings Bank, Lowell, Mass. 
On Deposit. Bank Book Number 128790: 

First Federal Savings & Loan Association, Lowell, Mass. , 
formerly Middlesex Cooperative Bank, Lowell, Mass. 
Ten (10) Paid-Up Shares. Certificate No. 3025 $2,000.00 
Three (3) Matured Shares, Certificate No. 2380 600.00 



Total Value of Bank Shares: 
Total Assets: 



$4,082.90 



$2,600.00 



75 



LIABILITIES 



Total Liabilities: 

Total Assets, Less Liabilities: 



None 
$6,682.90 



Respectfully yours, 

TOWN OF CHELMSFORD, 
VETERANS' EMERGENCY FUND COMMITTEE, by 

Alfred H. Coburn 
Treasurer 



BOARD OF APPEALS 

Chairman-Marshall Arkin 

Vice Chairman-Robert Kydd 

Charles Higgins Alternates 

S. Robert Monaco Marguerite Waldron 

Carolyn Bennett Joe Dappel 

Daniel Burke 

The Board of Appeals has held forty-seven hearings 
for Special Permit/Variances. They were dispensed with 
as follows: 



Granted 

Denied 

Withdrawn 



22 

22 

3 



The Board would like to take this opportunity to 
thank the town employees and elected officials for their 
cooperation in the past year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Marshall Arkin 
Chairman 



PUBLIC LIBRARIES 

Adams Library, Boston Road 

Chelmsford Center 

Anna C. MacKay Memorial Library 

Newfield Street, North Chelmsford 



Library Trustees 

Elizabeth McCarthy, Chairman 
James Geary 
Howard Moore 



Audrey Carragher 

Jean Mansfield 

Roger SP. Welch 



After almost two years of planning, expansion became 
a reality in 1976. Purchased and converted for $98,000, 
the former Scorboria property adjacent to the Adams 
Library is now the Children's House holding 11,000 
books, records and toys of interest to pre-schoolers 
through grade 6. The second floor accomodates techni- 
cal service and administrative offices, allowing the 
original library building to more adequately handle the 
growing adult collection. Important as well are the 
additional staff parking spaces on the new grounds which 
allow for better use of the library's public lot. Although 
children are the conspicuous gainers as a result of this 
move, adult services have been able to make significant 
advances too. A Business and Legal Reference area has 
been created, the more than 500 current magazines and 
newspapers have moved to more spacious quarters, the 



fiction collection has been conveniently shifted to George 
Hall, and the Art & Music Department has acquired 
badly needed room by expanding into the former 
office area on the second floor. 

Despite time lost in the move, most departments 
and categories show use increase for 1976. Also signi- 
ficant is the fact that both Adams and MacKay are now 
open for 64 hours per week. MacKay, while not in- 
creasing its interior space, did enhance it with the 
completion of a two year improvement project that en- 
compassed the addition of carpeting and drapes as well 
as some repainting; regular monthly art exhibits are 
also a new feature. 

Substantial financial and/or personnel assistance was 
received in 1976 from: Neighborhood Youth Corps, 
C.E.T.A., HUD. Special gratitude goes, as always, to 
the Friends of the Library, whose various contributions 
in programming and equipment (most notably a Gestet- 
ner Printing Center) again added an important extra 
dimension to our service, the Chelmsford and Country 
Lane Garden Clubs, the Boy Scouts and the Camp Fire 
Girls. Finally, my personal thanks extend to the staff 
and Trustees of the libraries whose overall conscientious- 
ness and enthusiasm knows, in my experience, no 
library equal. Despite the noteworthy physical and 
material advances of the past years, these people remain 
Chelmsford's single greatest library asset. 

STATISTICAL REPORT 

Monies deposited with Town Treasurer $16,764.08 

Circulation 246,054 

New cards issued 2,402 

Program Attendance 4,212 

Employees (Full time, including CETA) 12 

Employees (Part time) 19 

Volunteers (Six or more hours per week) 5 

Department Heads: Goldie Creamer (MacKay branch), 
Lillian Storey (Circulation), Bea Beaubien (Children's 
House), Linda Webb (Art & Music), Joan Allard 
(Reference). 

Hours open per week for service (both libraries) 128 

Respectfully submitted, 

David J. Panciera 
Library Director 



76 



CEMETERY COMMISSION 

Gerald L. Hardy 

ArtherJ. Colmer Everett V. Olsen 

George E. Baxendale 

The Cemetery Commissioners are pleased to report 
some of our accomplishments this past year. 

In front of the Cemetery Garage, on Billerican Road, 
one hundred and seventy-five feet of iron fencing has 
been installed. This was paid for by the "Barris Fund". 

Fairview Cemetery has had three acres of land 
developed into lots. This Spring should see a comple- 
tion of this project. 

This past year the Cemetery Dept. and Townspeople 
were saddened by the death of Arne R. Olsen. Mr. 
Olsen was a Cemetery Commissioner for nearly forty 
years in Chelmsford. 

The Commissioners are very pleased to announce the 
appointment of Dr. Everett V. Olsen as Cemetery 
Commissioner, who will fill the post of his late father. 

Respectfully, 

Chairman, Gerald L. Hardy 
Everett V. Olsen 
ArthurJ. Colmer 



PARK DEPARTMENT 

Supt. of Parks - Donald P. Gray 

The Park Commissioners reappointed Don Gray as 
Park Superintendent and elected Joan Schenk as Chair- 
man at the organizational meeting. A special tribute 
was made to Ralph E. House after ending twenty five 
years of faithful dedication and service as a Park Com- 
missioner. 

During the early spring months, work commenced 
on clearing winter debris from all parks, commons, 
and squares and the areas were revitalized with spreading 
of necessary loam, seeding, fertilizing, and pruning of 
shrubs. All appropriate areas were planted with red, 
white, and blue annuals to welcome visitors and towns 
people to the approaching Bicentennial celebrations. 

The various flagpoles were all checked, repaired and 
painted. We most sincerely thank the people who have 
continually helped with the daily flag raisings. 

We express our sincere appreciation to Stott's Nursery 
for the donation of the blue spruce tree which was 
placed on the side lawn of the Town Hall. Also several 
garden clubs donated Tulip Trees which were planted 
in various appropriate sites. 

The Park Department has continued with the main- 
tenance responsibility at the Recreation Commission's 
baseball fields at Roberts Field, Strawberry Hill, South 
Row recreational area, fields near Southwell Combing 
Mill in North Chelmsford, East school fields, Little 
League fields on Chelmsford Street as well as the ice 
skating area at Roberts Field. The play areas at Roberts 
Field were greatly extended during the year. 



We wish to thank the various town departments and 
garden clubs for their continued support and coopera- 
tion. A special thanks to the Tree Warden for his advice 
and help and we are indebted to the fire and highway 
departments for their unending assistance. Their efforts 
are most appreciated by all the Commission members. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Bradford O. Emerson 

Arthur L. Bennett 

Joan Schenk 



D.P.W. STUDY COMMITTEE 

In February of 1976 the Department of Public Works 
(DPW) Study Committee presented a set of recommen- 
dations to the Board of Selectmen based on a year's 
study of the workings of the departments existing in 
Chelmsford as well as those of some 16 other towns. 
The committee concluded that a consolidation of several 
departments under a single DPW would be advisable 
within the next few years, particularly with the prospect 
of adding sewers to the town functions. The committee 
further concluded that before any consolidation is under- 
taken a more detailed study of the need and mechanism 
for consolidation should be done by a professional as 
the committee determined it had neither the expertise 
nor the resources to do this. The Selectmen then 
authorized the committee to investigate and pursue the 
availability of outside consulting services along with a 
suitable method of funding. 

For the past year the committee has investigated many 
sources of funding to no avail. In the past, funds 
for such activities were made available through HUD 
Chapter 701 , but these are no longer available for 
this type of study since the funds are so limited. The 
committee contacted the regional planning agency, the 
Northern Middlesex Area Commission (NMAC), and was 
informed that only limited assistance could be ofered. 

In the area of outside consulting a request for pro- 
posals was developed, let out in June, and bids were 
opened in September. The committee's selection will be 
presented at the annual town meeting concomitant with 
a request for funds. A detailed inventory of the heavy 
equipment within the Chelmsford departments was 
compiled, assembled, and added to data gathered the 
previous year. 

The committee also sought help through the Techno- 
logy Transfer program in which Chelmsford was selected 
to participate. In this regard, Mr. Robert A. Cox, 
the director of the New England Innovation Group 
(NEIG), has met with the committee on several occasions. 
NEIG is a federally funded organization designed to 
foster and implement the concept of transfer of federally 
developed technology to the local governmental level. 
The NEIG is presently formulating a plan to study 
the public works types of services in Chelmsford and 
several other Massachusetts towns of similar size and 
character. This would be a pilot study which could 
subsequently be used by other towns as a model for 
the evaluation of their respective public works operations. 

Gerald Silver, Chairman 
George Auchy Richard Russell 



77 



Barbara Langworthy 
Henry McClean 



Joan Schenk 

Arthur Glazer 

(Resigned 9/24/76) 



RECREATION COMMISSION 

At last year's Annual Town Meeting a sum was 
approved to hire a Planner to create a Master Plan 
for development of Town owned lands for Community 
Recreation. The Master Plan, proposed by Frank C. 
Gelinas Associates, is now available for Community 
approval. 

The Commission is grateful for the efforts of the 
engineers and architects and of our own staff members 
for the finished product. We believe that it represents 
an effort that the Community can be proud of and 
supportive of in its implementation. The Master Plan 
embraces three properties; Robert's, Sheehan and the 
Southwell Combing area. Each property will be devel- 
oped in an entirely different manner, with special 
emphasis on family recreation. 

It is the intention of the Commission to develop 
the Plan in an orderly fashion and to seek whatever 
State or Federal funds that might be available to assist 
in the completion of the project. 

The use of the East School as a Community Center 
was an additional factor in the progress we experienced 
during the year. All equipment is now adequately 
stored and catalogued to control purchases of equipment. 
Some 26 Community groups now use this Center on a 
regular basis and plans are underway to schedule classes 
on a fee basis for such activities as ballroom dancing, 
bridge classes and others which will be announced. 

Repairs were made on the building including a re- 
surfacing of the parking area, outdoor safety lighting, 
roof repairs, re-surfacing of the interior floors, re- 
designing the bathroom facilities and the water system, 
interior painting and construction of additional office 
space. This is a sound, well-designed building and can 
be utilized for many years as a Community Center. 
The Commission will continue to make maximum use 
of the East School and look eagerly to the Community 
for its ideas in making this a Center. 

Our regular programs were very successful with a wide 
range of activities available throughout the year. The 
members of the Commission were grateful for the efforts 
of all volunteers. Without this veritable army of volun- 
teers the success our programs have enjoyed would have 
been doubtful, and the Town would have had to expend 
considerably larger amounts of money. We are also 
grateful for the cooperation and encouragement of other 
Town Boards. 

Every playing field, playground and gymnasium was 
utilized in such activities as soccer, basketball, Softball, 
baseball, football, tennis, track and field, wrestling, 
weightlifting, gymnastics, as well as those activities 
normally associated with our regular Summer Play- 
ground programs. 

During the summer the Commission also sponsored 
three band concerts on the Common and three theatrical 
productions by the Chelmsford Free Summer Theatre 
group. The Commission also sponsored its Annual 
July 4th Road Race. 



Several recreation projects were completed during the 
year. New Softball fields were completed and were in 
use at the McFarlin and East Schools. A new infield 
was completed at the South Row School and will be in 
use this spring. A new enclosed Softball field was com- 
pleted at the Southwell Combing property in North 
Chelmsford, and will be in use this spring. 

Additional lighting at the McCarthy Tennis Courts 
was completed and will be in use this spring. The 
Robert's Skating Pond was cleaned and enlarged slightly. 
New lighting was completed for night-time use. In 
addition, the playing fields at the rear of the Robert's 
ball fields were completely graded and grassed for use 
this year in soccer and football. Fencing was added at 
the McFarlin Softball area for the safety of the players, 
and new players' benches were installed at five areas. 

The Crystal Lake project was not completed in time 
to provide swimming lessons to residents at the Town- 
owned Edward's Beach area. However, it is the intention 
of the Commission to provide for such swimming in the 
new year's Budget, at which time we are advised the 
water will be sufficient for this activity. Every child in 
the Community should be able to swim, and this beach 
is the only Town area where swimming for any resident 
is available. The Commonwealth and the Taxpayers of 
the Town were generous in providing the funds for re- 
building the dam and site development. Now, we must 
see that those who paid the costs will have a recreation 
site that can be fully utilized by the Community. 

The Commission will continue to work for the use of 
volunteers whenever possible in its Programs because we 
earnestly believe that this type of programming is in 
the best interests of the Community. This extensive 
volunteer effort not only saves valuable tax funds, but 
it is the primary reason why our programs are successful. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William A. Dempster, Jr., Chairman 
Robert Charpentier Paul Murphy, Vice Chairman 

Harry Ayotte Robert Roche 

Joan Murray Jack Peters 

Russell Kerr, Director Evelyn Newman, 

Administrative Assistant 



YOUTH CENTER 



Growth and change are the key words to describe 
this sixth successful year at the Youth Center. Gary 
Wolcott resigned his position as Coordinator, after 
leading the Youth Center through three years of tre- 
mendous growth. Gary's dedication and enthusiasm 
were major factors in his great success. The Youth 
Center Advisory Board and the youth of Chelmsford 
benefited from Gary's presence, and we thank him. 

James Woodman has been appointed the new Coor- 
dinator. Formerly Director of the Leominster Youth 
Center, Jim is experienced and well qualified to lead 
the Center and help it provide activities for an ever- 
growing number of young people. 

Nineteen seventy-six was a busy year for the Youth 
Center participants, staff and Advisory Committee. 

78 



The McFarlin Center (housed in the McFarlin School) 
was open five nights per week (Monday-Friday). Various 
programs, including Arts & Crafts, Athletics and Films, 
were run weekly at the Center, as well as regular 
tournaments in Chess, Checkers, Foosball, Pool and 
Ping Pong. 

The beginning of the year also saw the Youth Center 
engaged in a major fund raiser - The "McDollars Cam- 
paign". In cooperation with the Chelmsford McDonalds 
and its Manager, Frank Collison, Youth Center parti- 
cipants and volunteers sold "McDollar" certificates which 
were good for one Dollar's worth of food. In turn the 
Youth Center received forty cents of the proceeds from 
the sale of each certificate. Money collected was used 
for renovation, programming, and equipment at the 
Youth Center. Many thanks must go out to McDonalds 
and the Chelmsford Jaycees for their generosity, and to 
all the Youth Center people and volunteers who worked 
so hard to make this massive fundraising effort such a 
success. 

The Arts and Crafts program, run by Ms. Andrea 
Johnson, Chief Supervisor, and staff members, Ms. 
Robin Bowen (CETA) and Ms. Pat Crowell emphasized 
craft projects that are inexpensive and can be completed 
in an evening. The youth were very responsive to this 
program and enthusiastic about their works of art. 

The Athletic program included volleyball, basketball 
and weighlifting, along with a Gymnastics program. 
Mr. Mike Fay, Athletic Supervisor, offered competent 
supervision and instruction in all of these activities. 
During the summer months, softball, frisbee and cage- 
ball are run outside on the McFarlin field and generate 
much enthusiasm for sports activities. 

Again this year we have been fortunate to receive 
free films from Boston Public Library with the assistance 
of Adams Library staff. Staff member, Larry Noyes 
(CETA), received much support in ordering the films 
and input from Youth Center participants as to what 
films were enjoyed the most. We were also able to 
purchase a movie projector and screen to show the 
films through generous help from the Chelmsford 
Jaycee-ettes. 

Another regular feature at the Center are our special 
"Coffeehouses", run on Wednesday nights. Many 
talented local musicians have entertained kids and staff 
alike, both inside during the winter and outside during 
the summer. With the acquisition of a P. A. system, 
we have been able to offer many evenings of fine 
music. We also sponsored several dances during the 
year, providing an opportunity for local bands from 
Chelmsford to play for their peers, along with other 
groups. 

The Youth Center Shuttle Bus ran again this year 
to offer transportation to and from the Youth Center 
for kids from outlying areas of Town. The Council 
on Aging has been most cooperative in allowing us to 
use their van three evenings per week. The Shuttle 
Bus has provided an important service for Youth Center 
participants, and we appreciate the generosity of the 
CO. A. We have seen many youth at the Center who 
would not have been able to come without the Shuttle 
Bus. Staff member, Larry Noyes (CETA) did the 
evening driving for the Youth Center as well as offer 
back-up driving for the Council on Aging when ne- 
cessary. 



The Youth Center offered many field trips over the 
year, including a ski trip to Mt. Whittier, N.H., 
several hikes in the White Mountains, and Mt. Monad- 
nock, a thirty mile bike trip through Groton, Littleton, 
Westford and Chelmsford, and museums on the North 
Shore and Boston. We also visited the John Hancock 
Tower in Boston, held a Beach trip to Wallis Sands, 
N.H., and had a guided tour of the Polaroid Company 
in Waltham in conjunction with a Photography Work- 
shop. 

The Youth Center also held two Clown Workshops 
in preparation for the Fourth of July celebration; and, 
on the Fourth, we had 30 clowns walking with the 
parade, entertaining children and adults along the 
route. We also held our annual Fourth of July Raffle, 
offering a variety of prizes and a chance to let people 
know who we are and what we do. The money raised 
through the raffle was used to purchase equipment for 
the Center. 

In April, 1976, the Quessy building was closed down 
as a Youth Center, and in August the Youth Center 
office was relocated in the Emerson House on North 
Road. Neighborhood Youth Corps participants were 
hard at work during the summer, painting and sanding 
in the offices in the building and the results were 
excellent. Linda Emmons, an N.Y.C. participant, re- 
mained with the Youth Center over the school year 
and proved valuable in her help with publicity and 
office duties. 

In the fall, 1976, the Youth Center began a weekly 
growth group, meeting on Tuesday afternoons at the 
Emerson House. Ms. Andrea Johnson and Gary Wolcott, 
Coordinator, Co-led the group of seven Youth Center 
participants. Activities for the group ranged from 
discussions to scavenger hunts and games. The group 
has been very successful and has become an on-going 
activity. We are also planning to begin a second group 
which will meet during the evening. 

We were fortunate to have a Work-Study student, 
Ms. Carol Dionne, from the University of New Hamp- 
shire, working with the Youth Center over the summer. 
With Carol's energy and enthusiasm, we were able to 
do much planning for the winter months. 

Looking toward 1977, the Youth Center Advisory 
Board has been heavily involved with plans for a 
Dance Marathon. Working in conjunction with the 
Scholarship Committee, the Advisory Board has high 
hopes for a most successful fundraiser, with all monies 
to be used for new equipment and programming at 
the Center. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 
Jan Greeno, Chairperson 



Members: 

Everett Brown 

Phyllis Dougherty 
Jay Finnegan 

Michael Gilchrist 

Jan Greeno, Chairperson 

Judy Harrison, Treasurer 

79 



Wendell Luke 
Elizabeth Marshall 
George Weinert 
Jo Ann Weisman, Secretary 

Selectmen's Representative: 
William Murphy 

ExOfficio Members: 
Norman Douglas 
Robert Hall 
Brian Sullivan 



PLUMBING INSPECTOR 

Plumbing Inspector - William Shedd 

This being the first year that the Plumbing Inspector 
has been transferred from the Board of Health to the 
Building Inspector's office. It makes a very efficient 
operation. 

The plumbing inspector, gas inspector, wire inspector, 
and building inspector's work is very closely related; 
therefore the expenses are reduced considerably. I thank 
all the inspectors, the townspeople and other depart- 
ments for their cooperation. 

From July 1, 1976, to Dec. 31, 1976, there were 19 
hot water tank permits issued, and 71 Plumbing permits 
issued. 

Respectfully submitted, 

William Shedd 
Plumbing Inspector 



There were 428 applications for wire permits issued 
in 1976. Some of these requiring several inspections. 

Inspections made for wire permits 

Type of Inspections 



Commercial & Industrial buildings 

Residential buildings 

Service chgs., dryers, pools, relocations, etc. 



927 

No. 

297 
243 

387 



Respectfully submitted, 

Harold Tucke 
Wire Inspector 

GAS INSPECTOR 

Gas Inspector - Neal Stanley 

Nineteen seventy-six has proven to be an eventful 
year with all the inspectors in the same office, my 
position as Gas Inspector has been made more efficient 
which means a more efficient department for the Town 
of Chelmsford. I wish to thank all the people and de- 
partments that have cooperated so much to make this 
department what it is. 

There were 311 permits issued in 1976. 

There were 600 inspections made by the Gas Insp. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Neal Stanley 
Gas Inspector 



WIRE INSPECTOR 

Wire Inspector - Harold Tucke 

As of July 1, 1976, the Wiring Inspector became a 
full time position, and a very eventfull one at that. 

With the position becoming full time, the responsi- 
bilities have been insurmountable. 

Working with the Building Inspector under Chapter 
802 on many and frequent occasions and my own Chap- 
ter 30 A, the work load keeps me very busy and occupied. 
I have to work extensively with Mass. Electric which 
requires them to notify me of all meter changes, Power 
Services of any nature, and emergencies of the Town 
of Chelmsford, throughout day or night. The Fire 
Department on all fire situations being summoned 
whenever a situation arises day or night. 

Working extensively with the Plumbing Inspector 
on all changes concerning electrical hot water heaters, 
etc., also working extensively with the Gas Inspector, 
on air conditioner systems being gas fired but electrical 
cooled. 

Working with all signs being erected, which requires 
electrical permits. 

It makes it very convenient for a group of inspectors 
working together. 



SEALER OF WEIGHTS & MEASURES 

As Sealer of Weights and Measures for the Town of 
Chelmsford, I wish to submit my report for the year 1976. 

In performing my duty, I have sealed the following: 

164 Gasoline Meters 

25 Scales- 100 to 5,000 Pounds 

63 Scales-more than 10 less than 100 Pounds 

26 Scales- 10 Pounds or Less 
97 Avoirdupois Weights 

Money received from seals, the sum of $639.70, has 
been turned over to the Town Treasurer. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Anthony C. Ferreira 
Sealer of Weights and Measures 



80 



INSPECTOR OF ANIMALS 

The following is the Animal Inspector's report for 
the year 1976. 



Number of dog bites 
Number of cattle 
Number of horses 
Number of sheep 
Number of swine 
Number of cases of rabies* 
Number of cases of bovine TB 

*One cas of bat rabies 



62 

210 

60 

14 

338 







Respectfully submitted, 

Martin A. Gruber, D.V.M. 

DOG OFFICER 

The following is a report of my services as Dog 
Officer for the year 1976: 

Stray dogs sold to individuals 68 

Stray dogs sent to Medical Schools 170 

Stray dogs disposed of 20 

Total strays picked up 258 



Complainst investigated 

Miscellaneous calls 

Dead animals picked up 

Miles traveled 

Lost dogs returned to owners 



1073 

3298 

374 

22485 

114 

Respectfully submitted, 

Frank Wojtas 
Dog Officer 




View from trail, Deep Brook Reservation, 
North Chelmsford. 




Scouts clearing brook, 

George B.B. Wright Reservation. 



One of the major future problems Chelmsford faces 
is water supply. Both the water district consolidation 
study and the recommendations of the local Growth 
Policy Committee point to water supply as a major con- 
cern. In response to this difficulty the commission has 
initiated a study to assess the ground water supply in 
Chelmsford. It is hoped that the results of this study will 
make available to all commissions and boards the infor- 
mation essential to their decisions related to ground 
water supply. 

The Winter Carnival was held by the Jaycees but lack 
of snow restricted the use of some of our reservations 
for skiing and snowshoe races. 

A hiking trail and a cross country ski trail have been 
developed at Crooked Spring Reservation, signs erected 
on various reservations and the hiking trail remarked 
and cleared for snow shoes on George B. B. Wright 
reservation, by scout troops and members of troops doing 
projects for various ranks. 

A fine job was done on the arbor day tree program 
by Miss Peggy MacDonald a student at Chelmsford High 
School and a member of the class on environmental 
studies. 

The acquisition of 20.47 acres near Water Department 
land off Canal street in West Chelmsford and a gift of 
4 acres of land in South Chelmsford was the extent of 
new land acquisitions due to an article to acquire 32.5 
acres abutting Crystal Lake being defeated at Town 
Meeting. There is now 2.3% of the land in Chelmsford 
set aside for conservation and passive recreation indi- 
cating that the commission must continue with a strenu- 
ous program of land acquisition in order to keep Chelms- 
ford a desirable place to live. 

The property on Russell Mill pond is now the property 
of the Town and self-help funds have been approved 
by the State in the amount of $69,000.00 reimbursement 
to the Town to defray the purchase costs. 

In the face of ever-increasing responsibilities, the 
commission has taken two steps which are aimed at 
greater efficiency: 



81 



1. The commission has organized into subcommittees 
(a) Open Space Planning and Acquisition, (b) Wetlands 
Protection, (c) Reservation Management, and (d) Agri- 
culture. By specializing in specific areas it is hoped that 
concentrated attention will allow programs to be imple- 
mented much more quickly than in the past. The 
effectiveness of this approach has been demonstrated 
in Acquisition and Wetlands Subcommittees. The ap- 
proach is yet to be proven in addressing Reservation 
Management and Agriculture issues. 

2. Volunteer consultants have been appointed to share 
the workload of the commission. Frank Siraco and Claire 
Thompson both have made major contributions to the 
commission in a very short period of time. Their under- 
standing of the fundamental responsibility of the com- 
mission and the dedication they have demonstrated are 
an example of how the concept of home rule can be 
effective - concerned citizens willing to do the work 
necessary for a better tomorrow. 



and comprehensive approach to the Wetlands Protection 
Act in Massachusetts. This is substantiated by activities 
of commission members at the state level. John Balco, 
Russ Rowe, and Janet Lombard have participated in 
initial efforts to develop an educational television tape 
on the Wetlands Protection Act which is being for- 
mulated by the Co-operative Extension Service. John 
Balco was a panelist on the Wetlands Protection Act 
during the semi-annual meeting of the Massachusetts 
Association of Conservation Commissions. 

The "Water Watch Program" was implemented 
during 1976. Water levels of major streams are recorded 
monthly from 17 stations located throughout the Town. 
This will allow the compilation of a long term data base 
to stream elevation which will allow better judgements 
to be made on water and wetlands related issues. 



TREE DEPARTMENT 



CONSERVATION COMMISSION 

Chelmsford Conservation Commission Members 

Chairman, Donald A. House 
Clerk, David Merrill Treasurer, John Balco 

Robert E. Howe John McCormick 



Leaving commission during year: 

Jane McKersie 
Janet Lombard 
Torrey Gullion 



Newly appointed: 

Edward Duffy 
David Merrill 
Charles Parlee 



Nineteen seventy-six was a year of many changes and 
accomplishments for the Chelmsford Conservation Com- 
mission. New programs were started, three new mem- 
bers, and considerable reorganization of the commission 
all took place during the year. 

Three members of the commission chose not to seek 
reappointment or resigned during the year; Torrey 
Gullion, Janet Lombard, and Commission Clerk Jane 
McKersie. These individuals have worked untold hours 
toward the rational use of Chelmsford's resources. Always 
willing to take new responsibilities. Always to be relied 
upon to do what was asked. They will be surely missed 
by the Town and commission. 

Three local businessmen have been appointed by the 
Board of Selectmen to fill the vacancies left on the 
commission: David Merrill, who had worked with the 
commission as a volunteer associate consultant thereby 
bringing considerable knowledge with him of the work- 
ings and aims of the commission; also Edward Duffy; 
and Charles Parlee. 

There were 15 hearings under the Wetlands Protec- 
tion Act. Eleven since June of these six were appealed 
to the Department of Environmental Quality Engi- 
neering. In each case the results of the appeals essentially 
upheld the decision of the local Conservation Com- 
mission. 

During the year a major review of the commission's 
technical guidelines and operating procedures under the 
Wetlands Protection Act was completed. The com- 
mission believes that Chelmsford has the most complete 



This department has removed 114 dead trees during 
this year. In addition to this, over 200 trees have been 
pruned of all dead wood and low hanging limbs that 
were interfering with auto and pedestrian traffic. 

Most of this departments efforts in pruning can be 
seen on Dalton Road, Robin Hill Road, and Fay Street. 
Other streets are planned for 1977. 

This year trees had to be removed on North Road, 
for sidewalk construction. This department plans on 
tree plantings in the Spring and Fall of '77, along this 
street. 

Presently there aren't any pests or diseases evident 
in the town doing any serious harm to our trees. 

However, most of our weaker trees can not continue 
to survive in certain areas because of some conditions 
that are not related as actual tree problems. Examples 
are vandalism, air pollution, utility works above and 
under ground, heavily salted streets, an auto accidents 
involving trees. 

These are some of the reasons when planting on 
municipal property, we must carefully select our trees. 

During the year, two surveys were taken to determine 
what trees need repair or should be removed. This is 
a procedure used by most towns, however, it is difficult 
to see every tree problem during the survey. As a result 
of this problem, I encourage any property owners to 
make this department aware of any problems they may 
find. 

Once again, I would like to thank all department 
heads who may have assisted this department during 
storms and our routine work. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Myles F. Hogan 



INSECT PEST CONTROL 
DEPARTMENT 

During the year this department has used 80% of its 



82 



appropriation on the removal of diseased Elms. 

This year many species of our trees were again infested 
by Fall Web Worms. Usually the pest defoliates trees 
and gradually weakens them. As a result of the con- 
tinued presence of this pest, many of our smaller and 
less desirable trees were destroyed, resulting in their 
removal. 

At this time spraying for this pest is not practical 
because of the short time periods that they are susceptible 
to pesitcide application. 

Although the Web Worm appears to be this depart- 
ment's most evident problem it is by far less costly 
when compared to the cost of Elm Tree removal. This 
department can not affectively reduce the loss of Elms 
or the cost involved in their removal until there is a 
reasonable state-wide compromise between environmen- 
talists and people involved in pesitcides. As in the 
past, this department will not undertake any pesticide 
applications unless it is absolutely necessary, and only 
after all town and state authorities have been notified. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Myles F. Hogan 

TOWN AIDE 

Throughout 1976, as in previous years, the Town 
Aide Department focused its efforts toward assisting 
the Townspeople by encouraging participation in all 
available anti-poverty programs. The effect of local 
economic conditions on Chelmsford's residents was 
demonstrated by the volume of activity this department 
experienced during the year. In addition to seeking 
increased awareness and participation in programs such 
as: Concentrated Employment Programs, Neighborhood 
Youth Corps, Headstart, Family Day Care Program, 
Foster Grandparent Program, and Retired Senior Volun- 
teer Program; involvement in new areas of social 
service began in 1976. 

Section 8 Rental Subsidy Program 

Sponsored through Department of Community Affairs 
by Community Teamwork, Inc., this federal program 
allows eligible applicants to seek their own housing/ 
apartment and receive a subsidy to help meet the costs 
of rent and utilities. 

Senior Companion Program 

Sponsored through ACTION by Community Team- 
work, Inc., Senior Companions are low income persons 
age sixty or over who provide person -to -person services 
and companionship for other adults with special needs. 
Participants may serve persons in private homes, nursing 
homes or other institutions and receive a weekly stipend. 

Energy Program 

Community Teamwork, Inc.'s fuel oil burner and 
winterization programs assist low income persons in 
meeting energy emergencies and to reduce long term 
energy costs. Free labor is available for the purpose of 
cleaning/repairing oil burners and winterizing homes. 
Free materials may be provided if the applicant is 
financially eligible. 



Food Stamp Program 

This is designed to assist participants by increasing 
the food -purchasing power of eligible households. As 
a participating community agency, this department 
began its program involvement in October 1976, after 
completing a two week training session. 



In November 1976, this department moved to the 
Town-owned Emerson House, 11 North Road, sharing 
office space with the Council on Aging. Location of 
the two departments within one facility has proven to 
be a logical step toward a comprehensive social service 
agency. 

COUNCIL ON AGING 

The Chelmsford Council on Aging is an organization 
providing services and programs which are designed 
to improve the quality of life for Town of Chelmsford 
residents who are sixty years of age or older. The 
following outline briefly describes the available programs 
which offered services for elderly residents in 1976. 
Further information relative to these programs may be 
obtained at the Council's office which has been located 
at the Emerson House, 11 North Road since November, 
1976. 

Nutrition Services 

The Elderly Lunch Program continued in 1976 to 
offer a nutritious luncheon one day a week for the cost 
of 50 <f per meal. The luncheon is held each Thursday 
(excluding school vacation weeks) beginning at 1:00 
p.m. at the McFarlin School. Over 4,500 meals were 
served in 1976. 

Volunteers delivered over 400 meals to home bound 
elderly in 1976, including 130 Easter dinners, 135 
Thanksgiving dinners and 135 Christmas dinners. 

Transportation Services 

Demand for the Council on Aging transportation 
service increased in 1976. This increase has made it 
impossible to satisfy all requests and has resulted in 
the development of a list of priority transportation 
needs and regular scheduling. During the year, the van 
traveled 20,492 miles and transported 4,087 elderly 
residents to their destinations. Due to the accrued 
mileage on the original van, a new vehicle was acquired 
in July 1976. 

Health Maintenance 

Sponsored by Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley 
in cooperation with the Lowell Visiting Nurse Associa- 
tion, the elderly health clinics serviced 340 persons 
during the year, including home visits made by the 
nurse. The clinics are held regularly each month at 
the North Congregational Church, Chelmsford Arms, 
and St. Mary's Church and offer services such as: 
blood pressure and cardiac status monitorization and 
assistance with medication regimes and diets. 

Elder Services of the Merrimack Valley 

Through an appropriation at the 1976 Annual Town 



83 



Meeting, the Town of Chelmsford continued as a 
sponsoring member of Elder Services of the Merrimack 
Valley (formally Merrimack Valley Home Care Center, 
Inc.), entitling Chelmsford's elderly to supportive ser- 
vices. The following report outlines the services offered 
by the agency during 1976 and the number of clients 
who received service: 



Direct Service 

(homemaker/chore services) 
Telephone Reassurance 
Income Tax Assistance 

Recreation 



53 

16 
11 



The popular Arts and Crafts Class was held at the 
Town Hall through most of 1976, but moved to the 
Council's new facility at the Emerson House in Novem- 
ber. Hand-made articles were created for the annual 
Fall Fair as well as the Fourth of July Fair. In addition, 
hats and mittens were given to the children of the 
Chelmsford/Westford Headstart Class at Christmas. 

The Council on Aging helped to sponsor various 
recreational trips planned by the Senior Citizens Club 
during the year. Senior Citizens traveled to such places 
as the Museum of Science, University of New Hampshire, 
Lake Ossippee, New England Aquarium, the Chateau 
de Ville and Hampton Beach. 

Attention focused once more during the year on the 
need for a centralized facility for the elderly. Through 
the efforts of Robert Flynn, Town Planner, a HUD 
Community Development Block Grant application was 
filed again in 1976. The application was approved in 
October and will provide $44,000. for renovation of 
the Old South Row School House on Mill Road. 
Completion of the project is expected in the summer 
of 1977. 

The Council on Aging would like to thank former 
members Joan Arcand, Charlotte Bovill and William 
Clarke for the valuable assistance they have given 
throughout their many years of service. In addition, 
the Council on Aging expresses appreciation to all 
persons who generously gave their time and effort in 
order to assist the elderly of the community and looks 
forward to another successful year of operation in 1977. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Christina Ahem 
Louise Bishop 
Clarence Dane 
Sara Dunigan 
Lillian Gould 



Gula N. Boyce, Chairman 

William Marson 

Mary McAuliffe 

Edna Nelson 

Kathleen Robinson 

H. Chadbourne Ward 



HOME RULE ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee is appointed 
by the Board of Selectmen to act as a research agency 
for the Board. In this vein the Committee follows legis- 
lation in the State House, offers studies on improving 
local government and advise on special studies requested 
by the Board. All this is done in an effort to preserve 
Home Rule at the local level. 



The past year HRAC, as requested by the Board of 
Selectmen, studied and reported to the Board on the 
possibility of dissolving the Town Forest Committee, 
the Sinking Fund Committee and looked into the area 
of professional management. As a result, two of these 
areas will come before the Annual Town Meeting. On 
HRAC own initiative there are two articles to come up 
at the Annual Town Meeting which it is hoped will 
improve the town meeting process. The Committee is 
also looking into other ways to improve, create better 
interest and involvement by Chelmsford citizens in their 
town government. 

The Home Rule Advisory Committee wishes to thank 
all Boards and Committees in Chelmsford for their 
help and support received this past year. The members 
of the HRAC are thanked for their efforts put forth in 
helping the Committee reach its goals. 

Carol Stark Jean-Paul Gravell 

Gerald Silver Richard Burtt 

Respectfully submitted, 

Denis Valdinocci, Chairman 



ENVIRONMENTAL ADVISORY 
COUNCIL 

Steering Committee 
Donald H. Caless Gerald F. Locker 

Ina B. Greenblatt, Chairperson Michael J. Potsaid 

Dr. Ethel N. Kamien Gene D. Roberts 

Diane H.Lewis Dorothy A. Stumpf 

Dr. Clara M. Refson - moved 

Members at Large 
Arthur Alexion Richard B. Codling 

Elizabeth Maloney, Secretary Mary M. Wadman 

This past summer a start was made by our Highway 
Department and Neighborhood Youth Corps in clearing 
drainage ditches and other waterways toward a program 
of town-wide mosquito control. This was the result of 
a detailed study done by Dr. Clara Refson, presented 
to the Board of Health and the Board of Selectmen 
as well as the townspeople. We hope to see an expansion 
of this program with the arrival of spring. 

Our projections regarding solid waste disposal and the 
role of recycling to reduce trash volume and expense 
proved on target. The Board of Selectmen's letter, 
included with the July tax bills, made the citizens aware 
of the necessity of cooperation in the recycling effort - 
the fact that recycling was not just the nice thing to do, 
but the essential thing to do. We sincerely hope the 
voters will wholeheartedly support the recycling articles 
on the Annual Town Meeting warrant as the urgent 
matters they are, and enable the CEAC to go on to 
other tasks. 

The Council has been greatly concerned over the 
lack of a salt shed as a means of protection of our 
water supply. Rising levels of salt in our water are of 
grave concern to those with heart, kidney, and elevated 
blood pressure problems. We urge your support of any 
articles for this much needed structure. 



8-1 



Again we thank all who have supported our efforts 
for the Town. 

The CEAC continues to monitor and study those 
things which affect Chelmsford environmentally so as to 
do our part in, "Protecting what the Sires have won". 

Respectfully submitted, 

Ina B. Greenblatt 
Chairperson 

NORTHERN MIDDLESEX AREA 
COMMISSION 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission (NMAC) 
is the agency conducting comprehensive regional plan- 
ning created by the communities in Northern Middlesex 
County (Billerica, Chelmsford, Dracut, Dunstable, Low- 
ell, Pepperell, Tewksbury, Tyngsborough and Westford). 
Each member community is represented by a selectman 
(in Lowell's case, a city councillor), a planning board 
member and an alternate named by the selectman 
(Lowell's alternate commissioner is designated by the 
City Manager). 

The NMAC commissioners provide local represen- 
tation and as a group provide policy leadership and 
guidance to the NMAC staff, which is composed of 
professional planners and technicians. The Commission 
meets at its offices (usually monthly) located at 144 
Merrimack Street, Lowell (phone 454-8021). The Com- 
mission's meetings are open to the public. 

A summary account of the major areas in which 
NMAC has been involved in the past year and some 
of the more significant accomplishments are as follows: 

Housing 

One of the more significant efforts engaged in the 
housing field by NMAC staff during 1976 was the pre- 
paration of Housing Assistance Plans for the area's 
communities. These involved the assessment of housing 
conditions, needs of elderly and lower-income families, 
community goals to meet those needs and prospective 
project locations. Such plans are a precondition to 
receiving community development block grants. 

Other areas of significant activity in the housing field 
in the past year included assistance to local housing 
authorities in their applications for housing assistance, 
a determination of the median price for purchase or 
rental of housing units in the region, and the conducting 
of a housing survey of the area's Spanish-speaking popu- 
lation. NMAC staff also completed a U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) compre- 
hensive questionnaire on NMAC's Housing Element, 
made up of housing activities which this agency must 
carry on for continued funding of our comprehensive 
planning effort. Activities relating indirectly to housing 
by improving living environments included the staffs 
assistance in the preparation of applications for com- 
munity development block grants. The region was 
awarded last year a total of $214,000, $59,000 in excess 
of the $155,000 originally earmarked for the area. 
Chelmsford received $44,000 in block grant funds for 
the rehabilitation of a town-owned structure to be used 
as a senior citizen drop-jn center. Yet another activity 



was the preparation of population forecasts for area 
communities. 

Economic Development 

Passage by Congress of the Public Works Employment 
Act of 1976 provided an opportunity for all area towns 
to apply for funds to build needed public facilities. 
NMAC provided extensive assistance in preparing appli- 
cations for these funds, completing environmental assess- 
ments, supplying unemployment data and preparing 
background information for distribution to each town 
on the Act itself. While no project in the area was 
funded by the original round of funding under the Act, 
it is generally expected that with an additional allocation 
likely to be authorized by Congress this year, there will 
be federal money forthcoming for some area projects 
during the coming year. 

In 1976 the Commission completed an Overall Econo- 
mic Development Plan for the Northern Middlesex Area. 
Through the Overall Economic Development Com- 
mittee, NMAC is moving forward in its attempts to 
establish a regional business information center to 
service small businesses in the region. Finally, NMAC 
hopes to secure official designation as an Economic 
Development District in the near future. Such a designa- 
tion would hopefully put the region in an advantageous 
position for receiving federal assistance for economic 
development projects. 

Growth Policy 

Implementation of the Massachusetts Growth Policy 
Development Act process (Chapter 807) was initiated 
in the Northern Middlesex area during 1976. NMAC 
has been actively involved in this process in a variety 
of ways since its inception. The Commission reviewed 
and commented upon the original lesislation and the 
draft questionnaire and supplied technical assistance 
to local communities during the formation and deli- 
berations of the Local Growth Policy Committees. 
NMAC then reviewed the Local Statements as they 
were completed and prepared a Regional Growth Policy 
Report. The Regional Report summarizes the Local 
Statements, analyzes the cumulative effect of each com- 
munity's policies concerning growth and development, 
suggests an overall set of growth policies for the region 
and comments on past, present and future State develop- 
ment-related policies. The Regional Report was endorsed 
by NMAC in November, 1976, and sent to the Massa- 
chusetts Office of State Planning as required by the Act. 

The Commission hopes that the goals and policies 
suggested in both the Local and Regional Reports 
will be the basis for continuing discussion within the 
region and will lead to more effective growth and 
development-related decision making by all levels of 
government. NMAC during the next year plans to be 
involved with the local communities in carefully re- 
viewing the State Growth Policy Report to insure that 
optimal consideration is given to the welfare of all 
the residents of the Northern Middlesex Area. 

Historic Preservation 

In 1976 the Commission was chosen by the Massa- 
chusetts Historical Commission to be the recipient of 
a grant to conduct a regional historical inventory. 
Ably assisted by the Historical Commissions from each 

85 



town, NMAC has inventoried a total of 600-750 struc- 
tures, with plans to include 300 of those inventories 
in its final report. For the first time, sites and structures 
that have a regional significance have been inventoried 
and extensive information and histories on each struc- 
ture gathered. In addition to this inventory, the Com- 
mission has provided assistance to member towns in 
identifying sources of funds for preservation activities, 
and has assisted Pepperell in establishing its Historical 
Commission. 

Water Quality 

The Northern Middlesex Area Commission has been 
designated as the planning agency responsible for a 
wastewater management study for the Lowell metro- 
politan area under section 208 of the 1972 Water 
Pollution Control Act Amendments. Under this pro- 
gram, areas of urban industrial concentrations with 
existing or anticipated water quality problems qualify 
for 100%-funded grants from the Environmental Pro- 
tection Agency. 

NMAC has been actively engaged in the preparation 
of a plan for the region dealing with water quality 
and wastewater treatment. This is the first time that 
a study of all types of water quality problems have 
been addressed comprehensively within the Northern 
Middlesex region. These water quality problems range 
from direct sources of pollution such as outfalls from 
sewers, treatment plants and storm drains, to indirect 
sources that eventually find their way into surface and 
groundwaters such as agricultural runoff, seepage from 
septic tanks and landfills, road salting, etc. 

NMAC staff and its consultants are in the process 
of completing the first phase of the study, which defines 
the scope of these problems by inventorying and sampling 
the region's pollution sources and its land use configura- 
tions, and by projecting future pollution loadings. 
The second phase will detail strategies for abating and 
controlling both direct and indirect sources through 
a variety of methods, from treatment plants to more 
effective land use planning. These alternatives will then 
be analyzed to determine the most cost-effective and 
efficient methods of attaining and maintaining clean 
ground and surface waters in the Northern Middlesex 
area. NMAC staff in 1976 assisted Chelmsford in its 
application for a Step I sewerage application. In the 
coming year, the staff will sample the effects of septic 
tank seepage on the brooks located in Chelmsford. 

Energy Conservation 

Working with the towns of Pepperell, Dunstable and 
Tyngsborough, NMAC took part in a pilot Energy 
Conservation project funded by the Massachusetts De- 
partment of Community Affairs. The goal of this pro- 
ject was to reduce energy use and to develop energy 
conservation standards for municipally-owned buildings 
and schools, municipal vehicles and street lighting. 
Energy use in these towns was measured and the buildings 
surveyed to determine all energy-conserving changes 
that should be made in operations and also any capital 
investments that would reduce energy use. Energy savings 
from this program were estimated to be between 30% 
and 40% of the total energy use. NMAC looks forward 
to working with other area communities in establishing 
this program and reducing their energy costs and energy 
use. 



Transportation 

In the region's transportation planning effort over 
the past year there were a number of notable accom- 
plishments. Perhaps the most significant achievement 
was the completion of the draft Transit Development 
Program (TDP), which sorts out the various transit 
alternatives that are available to both those com- 
munities already served by some form of transit and 
also those towns which might choose to contract for 
transit services in the future. Completion of the TDP is 
a precondition to the Lowell Regional Transit Authority's 
becoming eligible for federal assistance for capital 
improvements, such as the purchase of new buses, 
shelters, route signs and the like, and also for operating 
assistance. 

In a related effort, NMAC staff completed a study 
documenting the transportation needs of the area's 
elderly and handicapped population. Possible solutions 
that would meet those needs were also outlined. 

The region's annual Transportation Improvement 
Program (TIP) was drawn up after consultation with 
local officials. The TIP documents the region's present 
and anticipated transportation needs. The "annual 
element" of the TIP describes those highest priority 
transportation improvements (i.e. such diverse projects 
as intersection signalizations, highway improvements 
and purchase of transit equipment) eligible for federal 
and state financial assistance during the upcoming 
fiscal year. 

Other planning efforts included the continuation of 
work on the region's Comprehensive Transportation 
Study, which involved continued consultation with the 
region's Transportation Advisory Group composed of 
interested area officials and citizens; the continuation 
of planning assistance under contract with the Lowell 
Regional Transit Authority; and the lending of tech- 
nical assistance to local communities with respect to 
needed highway improvements. NMAC staff during 1976 
assisted Chelmsford officials in their effort to resolve 
the problem of truck traffic on Rte. 4. 



A-95 Clearinghouse 

NMAC continued in 1976 to serve as the region's 
A-95 clearinghouse. As such, all proposed federally- 
assisted projects were submitted during the application 
process to NMAC for review and comment. During 
the review process, special emphasis was placed on how 
these proposed projects would impact regional plans 
and goals. In addition, NMAC invited interested parties 
to comment on each proposal so as to further strengthen 
the requests for the federal assistance. 

The total amount of federal funding requested for 
projects submitted to NMAC for A-95 review was 
$127,000,000. 

Solid Waste 

The Commission continued its efforts to find an 
environmentally sound and cost efficient long-range 
solution to solid waste problems in the area. In addition 
to maintaining an up-to-date data base, the Commission 
assisted both the North East Solid Waste Committee, 
the State Bureau of Solid Waste and other interested 



86 



sponsors in evaluating sites for a disposal plant and 
transfer facilities, and technologies. Two conferences 
were held for local officials where the North East Solid 
Waste Committee's program and that of the City of 
Lowell were aired. 

Budget 

Fiscal 1976 expenditures totalled $385,875, of which 
$292,122 went to staff and office costs and $93,753 for 
transportation and water quality consultants. To pay 
these costs, member communities were assessed $60,000 
(Chelmsford was assessed for $8,592 in 1976). The 
balance was paid under contracts with the U.S. Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), the 
U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Federal 
Highway Administration (FHWA) via the Mass. Depart- 
ment of Public Works (DPW), Council on Aging Bus, 
Inc. (CAB), Lowell Regional Transit Authority (LRTA), 
the Urban Mass Transportation Administration 
(UMTA), and the Lowell City Development Authority 
(CD A). A graphic analysis of the sources for funding 
on a percentage basis is as follows: 



HOUSING AUTHORITY 

Chelmsford Arms, our only elderly housing project, 
has now been operational for a total of thirty months 
and during that time we have had a total of eleven 
apartment turnovers, four of those during the last 
year. Applications are still being received, processed 
and all eligible applicants placed on our waiting lists. 
Our preliminary application for a second elderly housing 
project has been approved by the Department of Com- 
munity Affairs but, due to the lack of funds for new 
construction, our application has been placed on file. 
When funds do become available for new construction, 
those funds will be allocated the communities with 
the greatest need for elderly housing. 

Our community residence at 34 Middlesex Street 
has just completed another year of successful operation. 
Applicants at this residence are selected by, and are 
under the administration of the Greater Lowell Asso- 
ciation For Retarded Citizens (LARK). Our housing 
authority leases this residence to LARK whose purpose 
is to furnish housing, with normal living conditions, 
for retarded women. 



SOURCES OF FUNDS 



F.Y. J97S 



UMTA 



LRTA 



FHWA 
(VIA MASS DPW) 



Prospects 




LOCAL 
ASStSSMtN / 3 



.6% C.O.A. 
.4%CA3, ,'NC. 



EFA 



HUD 



The Commission expects to make substantial advances 
for areawide planning in the coming year. 

The two- year water quality project will result in 
plans and programs for facilities and policies to imple- 
ment nation water quality standards in the area. A 
comprehensive transportation plan will be proposed for 
adoption. An areawide housing opportunity plan will 
be advanced for local concurrence. These efforts, 
coupled with the statewide growth policy report should 
provide a firm sense of direction for the region. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Philip L. Currier, Selectmen's Rep. 

Eugene E. Gilet, Planning Board's Rep. 

John Kenney, Alternate 



Our participation in the States "Scattered Site" 
concept for Low Income Rental Assistance Program 
(Ch. 707) has been funded at the same level as last 
year and we therefore have been unable to increase our 
rental units under this program. We have applied for 
funds under a similar program by the U.S. Department 
of Housing and Urban Development (HUD Section 8) 
but have received no allocation of funds as of this 
date. At the present time Section 8 rental assistance is 
available to Chelmsford residents through Community 
Teamwork Inc. (CTI) of Lowell and all our applicants 
for low income family rental assistance are referred to 
CTI for their processing. 

Roger W. Boyd worked on the Housing Authority 
Study Committee during 1969 and continued as a 
member of the Authority from its formation in 1970 
until he passed away in November, 1976. During this 
time he served as the Treasurer and was particularly 
interested in the development of Chelmsford Arms. 

Our gratitude goes to the people of the Town and 
the Town Officials for their continued interest and 
support in our work. Our meetings are held on the 
first Tuesday of each month in the Community Building 
of Chelmsford Arms at 1 Smith Street and all meetings 
are open to the public. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Claude A. Harvey, Chairman 

Robert L. Hughes 

Richard L. Monahan 

Ruth K. Delaney 

John M. Manning 



FLOOD PREVENTION STUDY 
COMMITTEE 

The committee completed its final report, "Drainage 
and Flood Control, Town of Chelmsford, Massachu- 



87 



setts", and submitted it to the Board of Selectmen on 
July 21, 1976. Chelmsford's interim HUD Flood Hazard 
Boundary Map, revised at the request of the com- 
mittee, was received from the Federal Insurance Ad- 
ministration on September 30, 1976. 

Respectfully submitted, 

HaroldS. Costa, Chairman 

John E. McCormack 

James K. Rogers 

SEWER COMMISSION 

The Sewer Commissions primary objective this past 
year has been with the preparation of the Step I - facility 
plan for a town wide, (90%), sewerage treatment system. 

The decision to procede with the facility plan was 
based on information obtained in April of 1976 from 
the state when we were notified that Federal and State 
construction aid-in-grant funds would be available for 
the lateral collection portion of a sewerage system. As 
the lateral collection portion of a system can approach 
60% of the total cost, the desirability of moving forward 
expeditiously to seek the aid-in grant funds became 
obvious. That laterals do represent the major cost of 
the system can now be substantiated as we have deter- 
mined that the cost to the town of a town wide system 
would escalate from 7 million to 37 million without the 
lateral construction aid grants. 

A contract was awarded and the preparation of the 
plan was initiated in July 1976. By virtue of an ambitious 
and successful undertaking copies of the complete and 
final reports of the Step I plan were submitted to the 
E.P.A. and the Massachusetts Division of Water Pollu- 
tion Control, (MDWPC), on December 21, 1976. 
However, from date of initiation of work on the plan, 
continuing contact and coordination was maintained 
with the Northern Middlesex Area Commission, the 
Environmental Protection Agency, the City of Lowell 
and the Division of Water Pollution Control. 

The facility plan as submitted basically proposed that 
Chelmsford tie-in with the Lowell Duck Island Sewerage 
Treatment Plant by connecting into the Lowell system 
in the Middlesex Street area and the Hadley Street 
area. Our proposal, being regional would also allow 
service to parts of Westford and Tyngsboro. The overall 
cost of the system would approach $46,121,000.00 of 
which $6.9 million would be borne by Chelmsford. 

The schedule as originally envisioned by the Com- 
mission enabling timely submission of our application 
for aid-in grant funds is as follows: 

CHELMSFORD SEWER PROGRAM 
GRANT APPLICATION SCHEDULE 



The schedule of submissions and approval as above 
was critical and necessary as the funding commitments 
for the construction aid grants must be effected prior 
to 30 September 1977 or funds would be lost. 

To demonstrate Chelmsford's willingness to procede 
with the implementation of a sewer system, at a special 
town meeting on December 1st, overwhelming approval 
to borrow 1.2 million dollars to support Step II was 
obtained from the voters. Work meanwhile continued 
to completion of the Step I portion of the plan and on 
December 14th, 1976, a meeting was held with MDWPC, 
Construction Grant Branch, to present the proposed 
sewerage treatment system per the plan. The State con- 
tended that the plan, although adequately addressing 
Chelmsford's local needs, was incomplete from an over- 
all or regional basis viewpoint as a facility plan for the 
Chelmsford tie-in to the Lowell system had not been 
completed. As the tie-ins are located in Lowell this 
latter facility plan would have to be undertaken by 
Lowell. It is the Sewer Commissions contention, however, 
that a facility plan for the tie-in could be completed 
concurrently with the design work in Chelmsford as our 
local system design would not be affected by the details 
of the Lowell connection. 

Following the meeting with MDWPC discussions 
continued with Lowell related to obtaining permission 
to join their system and on December 28th, 1976, 
a resolution was made by the Lowell City Council which 
did approve our connecting into their system, but subject 
to certain restrictions relative to costs, and to handling 
of sludge. 

Our work to date may be of no avail as the signi- 
ficant delay placed on the program by the hesitant 
action of the MDWPC may adversely effect the program, 
at least as we know it now. 

A request, nonetheless, has been placed with the 
Director, MDWPC seeking immediate approval of our 
facility plan so that we may procede with the Step II 
design in a time frame which might enable us to meet 
the September 30, 1977, construction grant approval 
deadline. As this response has not as yet been received 
the future of a Chelmsford Sewerage System at this 
time is indeterminate. Hopefully, the Community vs. 
the State vs. EPA paradox can be resolved and 
Chelmsford's liquid waste disposal problem can be solved 
in a manner which is both cost effective and within 
our economic capability to pay. 

Respectfully submitted, 

CHELMSFORD SEWER COMMISSION 

MatthewJ. Doyle, Chairman 

Joseph M. Gutwein 

TheodoreJ. Rapallo 



Initiate Step I facility plan preparation 7-01-76 

Submit facility plan (draft) to State and EPA 10-08-76 

Public hearing on facility plan 1 1-30-76 
Town meeting: Approve Step II funds - $1.2M12-01-76 

Submit facility plan final to State and EPA 12-15-76 

State and EPA approval of facility plan 1-15-77 

Initiate Step II: Prep, of designs and specs. 1-16-77 

Complete Step II: Designs and specs. 7-15-77 

Submit Step III Const, grant application 7-16-77 

State and EPA final approval 9-30-77 




\ 



./ 



v. 



HISTORICAL COMMISSION 

Audrey A. Carragher, Chairman 
JohnC. Alden J. Perry Richardson 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr. Robert C. Spaulding 

George A. Parkhurst Bertha E. Trubey, Clerk 

The Commission with the help of Mrs. Jane Drury 
has conducted research and survey work on historic 
areas, buildings, sites and objects. Twelve more houses 
have been inventoried. Additional work has been done 
for listing the Center Historic District in the National 
Register. A survey was completed on old railroad stations 
in the town. Attempts have been made to find the site 
of the first town meeting. Investigation is continuing 
to determine the significance of a carved stone found 
in the town. Historic areas were located for the state 
archeologist to aid in future planning. 

As the result of Commission action, three additional 
streets were designated as "scenic roads" at the town 
meeting to preserve their historical and natural character 
and physical appearance. 

A centennial ceremony was held at the First Parish 
Church and a plaque installed in recognition of the 
one hundred years of faithful service given by the town 
clock to the residents of Chelmsford. 

The Commission accepted the custody of the town 
quilt and displayed it at the District One School during 
the Bicentennial Celebration, and at the Carver quilt 
Exhibit. It is on permanent display at the Adams Library 
Children's House. 



A plaque was installed commemorating the restoration 
of the District One School (1802) by the Bicentennial 
Commission. The District Seven School master's desk 
was purchased and a school master's bell was donated 
by Mrs. Helen Poland. The Historical Society has 
donated the bell used at the Chelmsford Academy on 
Academy Street for the bell tower. A wood burning 
stove has been loaned by Mr. Louis Kelly. Mr. Charles 
Mitsakos set up a pilot program for the school depart- 
ment to utilize this valuable historic asset in the curri- 
culum. 

The Commission actively sought the protection of the 
1832 Toll House by requesting that it remain in the 
Center Historic District. 

Four certificates were presented to Chelmsford resi- 
dents in appreciation for their efforts in preserving 
Chelmsford's heritage. 

The Commission plans to continue the sign and marker 
project. It is hoped that the school program can be 
expanded to include more grades. The records and 
assets of the Bicentennial Commission are to be taken 
over this coming year. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Audrey A. Carragher 

CELEBRATIONS COMMITTEE 

During the Bicentennial Year of 1976, the Town 
Celebrations Committee, was most active, in coordina- 
ting various activities with the Revolutionary War 
Bicentennial Celebrations Commission, The Chelmsford 
Colonial Minutemen Coordinating Committee, the 
Board of Selectmen for the 300th Anniversary of our 
Country. 

The Bicentennial Celebration reached it's climax 
during the Fourth of July weekend in 1976, with the 
attendance of honored guests Councilwoman Helen How 
and husband Aubrey How, from Chelmsford, England, 
Mr. & Mrs. Sylvio Mainville and Mr. & Mrs. Esko 
Laakso, from Chelmsford, Canada. 

The Chelsmford Colonial Minutemen Coordinating 
Committee is to be complimented on their excellent 
planning and administration of the Country Fair on the 
Town Common, the Band Concerts, the largest and 
longest Grand Parade in the history of Chelmsford, 
attended by over 75,000 people. 

To the Chelmsford Art Society, for the Art Festival, 
to the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, for the Bicentennial 
Dinner, to All Saints Episcopal Church, for Bicentennial 
Sunday Services, to First Parish Unitarian Universalist 
Church, for the Bicentennial Breakfast, to the Chelms- 
ford Historical Society, to Adams Library Trustees for 
filming the Bicentennial activities, to the Camara Club, 
Chelmsford Newsweekly, Lowell Sun and Bonita Towle 
for Bicentennial pictures, also many other organizations 
which helped to make the Bicentennial Year Celebrations 
a huge success, many thanks. 

The commission wishes to thank and compliment 
personnel of the Chelmsford Police Department, for 



89 



their splended cooperation, the Massachusetts State 
Police and Chelmsford Police Criminal Bureau for 
security for our honored guests, special thanks to the 
Chelmsford Auxiliary Police Unit, personnel of the 
Chelmsford Fire Department, personnel of the Public 
Works and Parks Department, for making the Bicen- 
tennial year a safe and happy occassion. 

The commission thanks the Board of Selectmen and 
Executive Secretary Evelyn Haines for assistance and use 
of their facilities during the Bicentennial year. 

Preparations are now being made for the 1977 Fourth 
of July Celebrations. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Walter R. Hedlund, Chairman 

Raymond Day 

James K. Gifford 

Richard O. Lahue, Sr. 



Commission. Copies of Allen's "History of Chelmsford" 
(1820) and other literature published by the Bicentennial 
Commission may be purchased from the Historical Com- 
mission or at the Chelmsford Historical Society's Barrett - 
Byam House Museum. 

A final report covering all of the local Bicentennial 
activities is being prepared and will be published in the 
Spring of 1977. 

The Bicentennial Commission takes this time to thank 
all of the various town officials and departments for 
their assistance and cooperation throughout the cele- 
bration. 

Respectfully submitted, 

George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 



HISTORIC DISTRICT COMMISSION 



REVOLUTIONARY WAR 

BICENTENNIAL CELEBRATIONS 

COMMISSION 

George Adams Parkhurst, Chairman 
Hedwig H. Zabierek, Clerk 
John C. Alden Richard O. Lahue 

Audrey A. Carragher Janet Lombard 

MaryJ. Guaraldi CharlesJ. Marderosian 

Walter R. Hedlund Anna F. Normand 

John Perry Richardson 

More than five year's planning, preparation, and 
preliminary activities by the Bicentennial Commission 
culminated in an outstanding local celebration of our 
nation's 200th birthday on July 4th. The four days of 
Bicentennial events over the Independence Day weekend, 
organized jointly by the Chelmsford Colonial Minute- 
men, the Town Celebrations Commission, and the 
Bicentennial Commission, were highlighted by official 
visits of representative of Chelmsford, Essex, England 
and Chelmsford, Ontario, Canada. 

The Commission extends its thanks to the hundreds 
of local citizens and the many organizations who actively 
participated in the celebration. Special thanks go to the 
Chelmsford Art Society, the Chelmsford Lodge of Elks, 
the Chelmsford Historical Society, the Olde Chelmsford 
Garrison House Association, and the First Parish Church 
as well as the Chelmsford Colonial Minutemen and the 
Town Celebrations Commission. 



During the year the Commission had six hearings. 
Of these, three were for signs, one for the demolition 
of the barn and outbuildings on the Emerson property 
which the Town recently acquired, two were for changes 
other than signs. 

After this Commission's review all were approved and 
Certificates of Appropriateness were issued. 

On October 16, 1976, the Commission underwent 
reorganization. Robert LaPorte was elected Chairman, 
Perry Richardson, Vice Chairman. Stephen Wojcik was 
reappointed for a three year term. At the time of this 
writing we are about to have a public hearing involving 
changes in the Fiske property and The First Bank 
and Trust Company. As the former is considered to be 
one of the cornerstones of this district every attempt 
will be made to preserve as much of the site's historic 
character and ambience yet recognizing the principle 
of change. 

During the coming year the Commission will actively 
pursue enlarging the present boundaries of the district 
to include the former Ginger Ale plant and Westford 
Street to the 1-495 bridge. We are also interested in 
upgrading signs in the district and as new tenants take 
the place of older ones the signs should become more 
aesthetically pleasing. 

Robert LaPorte, Jr. 
Chairman 



The restored 1802 Schoolhouse in Forefathers' Burying 
Ground was rededicated on July 4th. The schoolroom 
is being furnished as it was 150 years ago and has 
already been used for half day "Colonial" classes by 
students from the Center School. It is expected that 
this program will be extended to other schools in the 
coming years. The schoolhouse also serves as the office 
of the Historical Commission. 



BOARD OF REGISTRARS 

MichaelJ. Devine, Chairman 

Robert J. Noble Edward H. Hilliard 

Mary E. St.Hilaire, Ex-Officio 



When the remaining students' desks have been in- 
stalled in early 1977, the Bicentennial Commission will 
have completed its work and will be disbanded. Its 
records and properties, as well as the maintenance of 
the 1802 Schoolhouse and the Middlesex Canal Toll 
House will be turned over to the Chelmsford Historical 



90 



Voting Strength as of December 31, 1976 



Prec. 

1 

2 

3 

4 

5 

6 

7 

8 

9 
10 
11 
12 
Total 



Dem. 



Ind. 



3121 



6110 



8232 



Amer. Total 

1 1654 

1 1231 

1880 

760 

1969 

1 1471 
1277 
1191 
1165 
1947 
1255 
1666 
3 17466 



PURCHASING AGENT 

The past year reflected the general trend towards 
centralized purchasing procedures. 



1976 



1975 



435 



235 



Completed Purchase 

Order Actions 
Total Purchase 

Dollar Value 
Non-Expendable Equip. & 

Supplies $193,713.50 $225,813.47 

(Non-Expendable = recovery dollar factor items) 



$659,904.85 $327,836.42 



The above figures do not include Capital Expendi- 
tures associated with the East Chelmsford Fire Station 
or the Crystal Lake Restoration Program. 

The previous report indicated the preparation of a 
"Purchasing Manual" for consideration and adoption 
by the Town of Chelmsford. This purchasing manual 
will provide a sound structure for an effective centralized 
purchasing program. The magnitude of public pur- 
chasing expenditures brings into focus the principle of 
accountability. The Purchasing Manual draft was dis- 
tributed to all Town Departments for individual review 
and constructive criticism. The final draft will be 
forwarded to the Board of Selectmen. The manual 
encompasses law, regulation, policy and practice. 

The Purchasing Agent derived personal satisfaction 
through involvement with various Town Commissions, 
Committees, and Departments in their Bicentennial 
preparation needs. I had the opportunity to work 
with many civic minded volunteers who gave unselfishly 
of their time so that the residents would be justly 
proud of their Town of Chelmsford, during 1976, our 
Country's Bicentennial Year. 

The Purchasing Agent regularly attended monthly 
meetings with Purchasing Officials from other Cities 
and Towns for an exchange of ideas and problems. 
It was a personal honor to achieve and be recognized 
as a Certified Purchasing Manager during the year 1976. 



Established goals for purchasing during 1977 consist 



of: 



1 . The establishment of an inventory control procedure 
on all capital expenditure equipment. 



2. Continued increase in the competitive bidding pro- 
cedure. 

3. Continued austerity in the Capital Expenditures 
area via the use of rental versus purchase. Remodel 
and repair of specific items in lieu of new purchases. 

4. Increased emphasis and participation in State Con- 
tract Collective Purchasing or consortium group pur- 
chasing whenever applicable and in the best interests 
of the Town of Chelmsford. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Chris Alexion 
Purchasing Agent 

TOWN PLANNER 

The position of Town Planner was established by the 
Board of Selectmen in September of 1974 and is funded 
through the Comprehensive Employment and Training 
Act. The basic function of the position is to assist 
in providing sound comprehensive planning for the Town 
of Chelmsford. 

Nineteen seventy-six saw the approval by the Depart- 
ment of Housing and Urban Development of the Town's 
request for funds to rehabilitate a town-owned structure 
for use as a Senior Citizen Drop-In Center. All required 
clearances have been obtained and construction will 
begin early this Spring with completion slated for the 
Summer of 1977. 

A study dealing with the problem of street acceptance 
was submitted to the Selectmen. This study analyzed 
the present procedures for street acceptance, specifically 
those not under the control of the Planning Board or 
covered by the Town's Subdivision Control Law. The 
recommendations presented within this report will hope- 
fully form the basis of a long term program designed 
to systematically alleviate this intricate and reoccuring 
problem. 

Central Square was the topic of much discussion over 
the past year. Traffic congestion, inadequate parking 
and aesthetic deterioration have all combined to pro- 
duce an undesirable condition to which all must agree 
that something must be done to remedy the situation. 
A local bank has taken the imitative, with the purchase 
of the former Fiske Property to provide additional 
parking for the Central Square users. This office has 
prepared a proposal for the re-development of Central 
Square beginning with a feasibility study which will 
include the amount of investment and re-investment 
required, funding alternatives and the methods of 
administrative control for such an undertaking. This 
proposal is presently being considered by the New 
England Regional Commission for funding. 

The Sidewalk Program is continuing, with Graniteville 
Road and Concord Road being slated for construction 
during the coming year. The Engineering and Design 
portion of the project continues to be provided at no 
cost to the Town by the Middlesex County Engineering 
Department. 

Routine duties for the year have included detailed 
review of all Federal and State "Grant-in-aid" programs 



91 



for which the town may be eligible to participate, 
and review of all legislation passed by the Congress or 
the State Legislature which could influence the growth, 
development, or quality of life within the Town of 
Chelmsford. 

A close working relationship has been maintained 
between this office and various Federal, State and local 
agencies such as the Office of State Planning, the Depart- 



ment of Community Affairs, and the Northern Middle- 
sex Area Commission. An effort has also been made to 
increase cooperation between local Boards, Commissions, 
and Committees thus avoiding duplication of effort in 
areas of common concern. 

Respectfully submitted, 



Robert W. Flynn 
Town Planner 



INSURANCE SINKING FUND COMMISSION 

January 1, 1976 -June 30, 1976* 





Balance 


Savings 


Cert. 


Bond 


Transfer 






Account 


1/1/76 


Interest 


Interest 


Interest 


In 


Withdrawal 


Balance 


Central Savings 147157 


3,759.93 


111 


21 










3,871.14 


Central Savings 174894 


28,594.89 


800.31 






1.581.20 


2,732.21 


28,244.19 


Central Savings 700148 


20,000.00 






** 








20,000.00 


Charlestown Sav. 74500809 


3.000.00 






** 








3,000.00 


10M Pub. Ser. N.H. 


10,312.50 








306,25 






10,312.50 


10MN.W. Bell Tel. 


9,787.50 








312.50 






9,787.50 


10M Hartford Elec. 


9,950.00 








325.00 






9,950.00 


lOMMich. Bell Tel. 


9,987.50 








318.75 






9,987.50 


lOMSo. Cal. Edison 


9,987.50 
105,379.82 






- 


318.70 
1,581.20 






9,987.50 


Total 


911 


52 


1,581.20 


2,732.21 


105,140.33 



*Fiscal year changed from December to June to conform with town fiscal year. 



**Payable in December 



CRYSTAL LAKE 
RESTORATION COMMITTEE 



Edmund Polubinski 
Peter Dulchinos 
Thomas E. Firth, Jr. 
Robert G. Gagnon 
PaulC. Hart 



Chairman 

John J. Kenney 

Robert C. McManimon 

Haworth C. Nield 

Thomas A. Palmer 



On December 8, 1975, a contract in the amount of 
six hundred forty four thousand eight hundred thirty 
three dollars ($644,833.00) was awarded to M. DeMatteo 
Construction Company of Quincy, Mass., for the restora- 
tion of Crystal Lake. Work commenced in early spring 
and at long last the end of the project was in sight. 
The projected completion date of September 30, 1976, 
was not met due in part to an unforeseen delay in 
obtaining specially treated timbers in the construction 
of the inlet and outlet gates. 

An extention of time was granted to and including 
November first. However, work still was not completed 
on the last day of the extention. DeMatteo Construction 
Company was notified that a penalty of two hundred 
dollars ($200.00) per day would be assessed from 
November 2, 1976, until work was completed. 

On December 8, 1976, we were informed by DeMatteo 
that the project was completed. This was confirmed by 
FAY, SPOFFORD AND THORNDIKE, Project En- 
gineers, on December 9, 1976. 



Approved: 

Raymond L. Reynolds 

Kenton Wells 

Lillian Stott, Commissioners 



We are now awaiting word from the Commonwealth 
of Mass., Department of Public Works, Division of 
Waterways, that the work performed on the restoration 
meets with their approval. Upon receipt of this infor- 
mation, the inlet gate can be opened and water will 
once again flow into the lake bed. Hopefully by the 
time you read this report, the lake will be partially 
filled. 

We would at this time like to express our sincere 
gratitude and appreciation to our representative to the 
Great and General Court, State and U.S. Government 
Employees, Chelmsford Board of Selectmen and all 
interested people who in any way helped make the 
Restoration of Crystal Lake possible. 

Respectfully submitted, 

Edmund Polubinski 
Chairman 



CATV ADVISORY COMMITTEE 

During 1976, the CATV Advisory Committee slowed 
its activities and met only three times to evaluate changes 
in industry patterns and to examine new technical 
developments appearing in trade journals. 



92 



This low activity was occasioned by a basic lack of 


Levy of 1975 
Personal Property 


9,285.88 




interest by industry groups : 


in bringing cable to Chelms- 


Real Estate 


30,322.92 




ford. There is little or no 


apparent demand and the 


Levy of 1976 






population density does not, as yet, warrant the ad- 
vertising needed to create a market. 


Personal Property 
Real Estate 


15.768.74 
284,876.92 


348,438.52 






Motor Vehicle Excise: 








Richard Arcand 


Levy of 1971 


115.40 






President 


Levy of 1972 
Levy of 1973 
Levy of 1 974 


35,702.65 
54,816.11 
54,754.71 




TOWN TREASURER 


Levy of 1 975 
Levy of 1976 


75,158.99 
379,339.07 












599,886.93 


Balance July 1, 1975 


$ 4,096,992.89 


Farm Excise: 






Receipts to June 30, 1976 


43,774,735.36 
$47,871,728.36 


Levy of 1975 
Levy of 1976 


123.50 
188.75 


312.25 


Paid out on Warrants 


46,119,677.24 


Special Taxes: 










Taxes in Litigation 




9,903.82 




$ 1,752,051.01 


Tax Titles & Possessions: 






Revenue Invested 


1,650,000.00 


Tax Titles 


44,095.35 








Tax Possessions 


10,469.17 


54,564.52 


Balance June 30, 1976 


$ 3,402,051.01 


Departmental: 
Off Duty Work Details 
Public Buildings 
Highway 


4,260.02 
825.00 
470.00 




TAX COLL 


Cemetery 


1,938.50 


7,493.52 






Water Districts: 










Liens Added to Taxes 






Levy of 1971: 




Levy of 1976 




68.00 


Excise 


$ 115.40 


Aid to Highways: 
State 


178,264.67 




Levy of 1972: 
Excise 


$ 35,702.65 


County 
Loans Authorized: 


21,874.33 


200,139.00 


Personal Property 





Sewer 


1,280,000.00 




Real Estate 





High School 
Crystal Lake 


540,000.00 
950,000.00 


2,770,000.00 


Levy of 1973: 




Transfers Authorized From: 






Excise 


f 54,816.11 


Stabilization Fund 




53,263.00 


(1973&1974)Personal Property 7,460.18 
(1973&1974)Real Estate 728.88 


Federal Revenue Sharing Funds: 
Public Law #92-51 2 
Underestimated Assessments: 




65,401.67 






State Recreation Areas 




1,319.22 


Levy of 1974: 




Air Pollution Control 




67.82 


Excise 


$ 54,754.71 










$7,151,088.34 


Levy of 1975: 


$ 75,158.99 








Excise 




Personal Property 


9,285.88 








Real Estate 


30,322.92 


LIABILITIES 


AND RESERVES 




Levy of 1976: 
Excise 




Temporary Loans: 






$379,339.07 


In Anticipation of Serial 
Loans 




$ 200,000.00 


Personal Property 


15,768.74 








Real Estate 


284,876.92 


Payroll Deductions: 

Guarantee Deposits: 
Planning Board 
Conservation Comm. 


4,110.00 
2,000.00 


147,188.79 


TOWN ACCOUNTANT 






6,110.00 


BALANCE SHEET 


- JUNE 30, 1976 


Agency: 
State- Registration Fees 
County-Sale of Dogs 


150.00 
45.00 




asset: 


County-Dog Licenses 


3,443.15 








Recording Fees 


117.00 




Cash: 




Water District-Liens 1976 


68.00 




General: 








3.823.15 


In Banks 


$1,302,199.99 








Invested: 




Tailings: 






Certificates of 




Unclaimed Checks 




2,555.78 


Deposit 


1,650,000.00 

$2,952,199.99 


Gifts and Bequests: 






Federal Revenue Sharing: 




Historical Commission 




25.00 


In Banks 


88,030.08 


Trust and Investment Fund Income 






Accounts Receivable: 




Conservation-Wright 




2,172.08 


Taxes: 










Levy of 1973-74 




Federal Grants: 






Personal Property 


7,460.18 


Public Law #81 -874 


178,960.01 




Real Estate 


728.88 


Public Law #92-51 2 


88,030.08 





93 



Public Law #89-10 Title II 
Public Law #89-10 Title III 
Merrimack Education Council 
Title I 
Title IV 



Revolving Funds: 
School Lunch 
School Athletics 



Appropriation Balances Forward 

Special Project Balances Forward 

Premium on Bond Issue 

Loans Authorized and Unissued 

Appropriation Authorized From: 
Stabilization Fund 
Purchase 1000 Gallon Pumper 

Federal Revenue Sharing Funds 
Public Law #92-51 2 
Sidewalks 
Acton Rd. Sidewalks 

Sale of Real Estate 

Sale of Cemetery Lots 

Receipts Reserved for Appropriation: 
Road Machinery Fund 
State Aid to Libraries 
Highways Chapter 825 Sec. I 

Reserve Fund - Overlay Surplus 



6,378.35 
82,656.44 
159,086.08 

5,926.39 
17,221.93 



40,596.67 
4,283.42 



Overlays Reserved for Abatements: 




Levy of 1972 


13,902.63 


Levy of 1973-74 


30,407.26 


Levy of 1975 


72,176.99 


Levy of 1976 


7,301.08 


Revenue Reserved until Collected: 




Motor Vehicle Excise 


599,886.93 


Farm Excise 


312.25 


Special Tax 


9,903.82 


Tax Title & Possessions 


54,564.52 


Departmental 


7,493.52 


Aid to Highways 


200,139.00 



538,259.28 



Overestimated Assessments: 
County Tax 
Special Education 
Mosquito Control 



Surplus Revenue Encumbered 
Surplus Revenue 



70,924.32 

8,491.00 

492.82 



79,908.14 



989,743.00 
381,162.67 





44,880.09 




$7,151,088.34 




643,675.84 








301,293.73 


NON-REVENUE ACCOUNTS 






439.20 


Cash in Banks 


$361,820.94 




2,570,000.00 
53,263.00 


Appropriation Balances: 






$361,820.94 






12,601.67 
52,800.00 


65,401.67 
3,999.87 


Highway Garage Construction 
School Construction 
Cemetery Equipment 
Crystal Lake Restoration 


$ 122.54 

290,018.51 

6.82 

71,673.07 




$361,820.94 




13,247.50 


DEBT ACCOUNTS 




2,841.60 
12,574.50 
86,849.06 


102,265.16 


Net Funded or Fixed Debt: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General 


$ 75,000.00 




5,586.39 


Outside Debt Limit: 
General 


11,640,000.00 


13,902.63 


$11,715,000.00 



123,787.96 



872,300.04 



Serial Loans: 
Inside Debt Limit: 
General: 
School 

Outside Debt Limit: 
General: 
School 



$ 75,000.00 



11,640,000 00 

$11,715,000.00 







DEBT 


STATEMENT 








Bond Issue 


Interest 


Outstanding 


Payment 


Outstanding 


Principal 


Interest 




Rate 


6-30-75 


1976 


6-30-76 


Due 1977 




High School Issue #1 


3.50 


100,000 


50,000 


50,000 


50,000 


1,750 


High School Issue #2 


3.20 


255,000 


85.000 


170,000 


85,000 


5,440 


South Row School 


3.50 


270,000 


45,000 


225,000 


45,000 


7,875 


1972 High School #1 


4.90 






1,200,000 


240,000 


58,800 


1972 High School #2 


4.40 


6,800,000 


850,000 


5,950,000 


850,000 


243,100 


Junior High School 


3.25 


965,000 


110,000 


855,000 


110,000 


27,788 


Westland-Harrington Schools 


4.30 


1,980,000 


160,000 


1,820,000 


160,000 


78,260 


Byam School 


6.00 


1,550,000 


105,000 


1,445,000 


105,000 


83,550 


Total 


11.920,000 


1,405,000 


11,715,000 


1,645,000 


506,563 



94 



TRUST AND INVESTMENT ACCOUNTS 



Custody of Library Trustees: 
Amos F. Adams 
George W. Barris 
Frances Clark 
Clement Fund 
Albert H. Davis 
Frederick B. Edwards 
Nathan B. Edwards 
Victor E. Edwards 
Adams Emerson 
Flint Fund 
George Memorial 
Thomas P. Proctor 
SalinaG. Richardson 
Joseph E. Warren 
Gertrude Wright 
Aaron George (Cemetery) 

Custody of Treasurer: 
Barris-Vamey Playground 
Barris Memorial-Cemetery 
Barris Fence Fund-Cemetery 
Perpetual Care-Cemetery 
Adams Emerson 
Conservation Fund 
Stabilization Fund 

Custody of Selectmen: 
Emma Gay-Varney Playground 

Custody of Sinking Fund Commission: 
Sinking Fund 

Custody of Veteran's Emergency Fund Committee 
Veteran's Emergency Fund 



Custody of Treasurer: 
Educational Collaborative Board 
Fund GL Chap. 40 Sec. 4-E 



Balance 


New Funds 


Withdrawals 


Balance 


6-30-75 


& Income 




6-30-76 


19,018.39 


976.80 


35.85 


19,959.34 


1,827.91 


341.32 


395.00 


1,774.23 


1,005.42 


54.96 




1,060.38 


13,867.56 


965.49 




14.833.05 


678.13 


37.05 




715.18 


10,706.53 


576.10 




11,282.63 


684.02 


36.82 




720.84 


2,051.84 


112.15 




2,163.99 


138.26 


7.43 




145.69 


3,277.52 


174.31 


56.00 


3,395.83 


1,891.07 


101.74 




1,992.81 


7,232.95 


375.60 




7,608.55 


369.19 


19.86 




389.05 


1,095.29 


58.93 




1,154.22 


567.12 


28.69 




595.81 


1,615.55 


86.93 




1,702.48 


1,535.76 


332.21 




1,867.97 


3,595.53 


4,438.01 




8,033.54 


128.28 


6.56 




134.84 


202,691.37 


39.569.34 


20,000.00 


222,260.71 


514.24 


27.68 




541.92 


117,480.97 


6,797.31 


17,000.00 


107,278.28 


77,788.89 


29,993.31 




107,782.20 


391.39 


24.83 




416.22 


101,717.84 


6,154.70 


2,732.21 


105,140.33 


6,370.74 


342.10 


205.42 


6,507.42 


578,241.76 


91,640.23 


40,424.48 


629,457.51 




37,296.11 


13,457.00 


23,839.11 



DISBURSEMENTS 




Public Safety: 
Police Department 












Salaries 


765,857.05 


883.749 29 




1975 


1976 


Expense & Outlay 


70,615.69 


83,080.85 








Purchase Cruisers 


22,942.00 


21,996.00 


General Government: 












Moderator 
Selectmen 


300.00 
47,767.72 


300.00 
49,350.93 


Total Police Department 


859,414.74 


988,826.14 


Accounting 


35,116.71 


45,725.84 








Treasurer & Collector 


83,565.03 


88,251.59 


Fire Department 






Assessors 


57,980.61 


63,924.89 


Salaries 


808,629.99 


904,347.15 


Town Clerk 


38,348.11 


36,676.70 


Expense & Outlay 


45,663.37 


48,219.49 


Public Buildings 


35,815.78 


27,887.08 


East Station Construction 




66,809.35 




17,434.58 


18,035.37 








Elections 


13,599.42 
11,151.50 


13,235.90 
14,320.95 


Total Fire Department 


854,293.36 


1,019,375.99 










Finance Committee 


1,413.58 


1,404.23 








Planning Board 


13,887.28 


6,701.55 


Miscellaneous Protection 






Board of Appeals 


3,010.96 


3,561.80 


Hydrant Service 


50,860.00 


51,340.00 


Personnel Board 


359.55 


584.40 


Tree Warden 


10,237.55 


13,833.25 


Town Forest Com. 


40.00 


104.00 


Building Inspector 


18,513.56 


20,605.72 


Conservation Commission 


12,786.77 


16,341.93 


Wire Inspector 


2,968.00 


5,807.53 


Historical Commission 


747.53 


896.08 


Gas Inspector 


1,920.00 


3,117.19 


Historic District Committee 




395.12 


Dog Officer 


12,806.44 


15,074.93 




144.00 


72.00 


Animal Inspector 


1,050.00 


1,100.00 


Home Rule Advisory Com. 


209.53 


206.75 


Sealer of Weights & Measures 


2,077.65 


2.895.20 


Council on Aging 


6,551.94 


8,606.29 


Civilian Defense 


6,481.95 


6,381.37 


Council on Aging-Van Purchase 


5,150.00 




Police Outside Detail 


75,226.75 


111,960.05 


Town Celebrations Com. 


2,993.22 


4,309.31 


Insect Pest Control 




15,017.95 


Bicentennial Celebration Com. 
C.A.T.V. Committee 




1 1 800 84 








149.31 


34.52 


Total Miscellaneous Protection 


182,141.90 


247,133.19 


Youth Center 


15,667.68 










Town Aide 


5,312.89 


8,504.89 


Public Health: 


33,252.91 


35,859.79 


Total General Government 


417,565.34 


445,444.66 





95 



Sewer Commission: 
Expenses 
Engineering Service 

Total Sewer Commission 



Highway Department: 
Salaries 
Utilities 
Street Signs 
Materials 
Misc. Equipment 
Machinery Hire 
Waste Collection 
Machinery Repairs 
Snow& Ice 
Construction 

Chap. 90 Maint. & Const. 
Sidewalks 

Equipment Purchase 
Maint. of Garage 
Clean Up Days 
Engineer Fees 
Outlays-Radio 
Gas Tank Installation 

Total Highway Department 

Street Lighting 

Veterans' Benefits: 
Salaries & Expenses 
Cash & Material Grants 

Total Veterans' Benefits 

Schools: 

School Committee 
Supt. Office 
Supervision 
Principals 
Teachers 
Textbooks 
Library 
Audio-Visual 
Guidance 

Psychological Service 
School Attendance 
Health Service 
Transportation 
Food Service 
Athletic Program 
Student Activities 
Driver Education 
Health Education 
Custodial 
Utilities 

Maint. of Grounds 
Maint. of Buildings 
Maint. of Equipment 
Adult Education 
Civic Activities 
Programs with other Schools 
Work Study Program 
Moving 

Total School Department 

School Revolving Funds: 
Cafeteria 
Athletics 
M. EX. Fund 
Title I 
Title II 
Title III 

Educational Collab. Fund 
Title IV 

Total Revolving Funds 
Regional Vocational School 



513.22 



269,945.49 

29,590.92 

2,769.86 

70,512.96 

1,449.01 

768.00 

321,544.24 

21,476.26 

144,425.79 

39,653.01 

74,720.68 

18,547.78 

35,801.00 

905.73 

9,739.93 

4,440.00 

942.24 



1,047,232.90 



54,929.33 



9,695.03 
117,400.80 



127,095.83 



21,241.94 

195,027.46 

171,338.48 

587,211.16 

6,596,361.32 

121,851.64 

213,228.28 

122,547.46 

268,737.82 

16,358.50 

14,707.60 

72,225.26 

743,413.55 

27,007.81 

72,613.34 

36,076.27 

3,060.00 

38,742.60 

525,556.53 

474,310.33 

17,533.27 

35,860.19 

34,311.44 

12,910.31 

19,942.63 

9,617.10 

15,616.52 

12,979.35 

10,480,388.16 



568,530.11 
26,899.74 
306,005.95 

11,970.22 
108,432.78 



1,021,838.80 



472,869.00 



507.60 
11,700.00 



290,727.14 

35,641.02 

2,283.87 

77,824.86 

1,495.76 

5,801.00 

370,634.20 

31,237.18 

203,631.81 

47,639.77 

78,632.02 

1,508.06 

81,425.37 

1,186.65 

9,549.13 

9,621.75 

16,390.00 

1,265,229.59 



54,559.87 



11,012.72 
78,542.67 



89,555.39 



32,449.83 
234,905.94 
189,900.11 
578,435.40 
7,521,328.82 
132,721.13 
271,716.45 
132,944.54 
315,645.52 

15,569.09 
75,841.05 

789,972.65 
66,243.38 

107,892.62 

35,347.23 

840.00 

46,792.75 

564,068.67 

511,944.85 
29,611.83 
77,787.65 
54,433.60 
15,834.27 
22,712.27 
7,711.50 
16,024.78 



11,848,675.93 



596,465.13 
11,160.13 
519,302.27 
81,605.21 
9,325.68 
87,767.81 
36,654.90 
6,325.62 

1,348,606.75 
339,375.34 



School Buidling Committee 



Libraries: 
Salaries 

Repairs & Maint. 
Fuel, Light & Water 
Books & Periodicals 
Other Expense 
Outlays 

Special Account 
Library Addition 

Total Libraries 



Recreation: 
Parks 

Varney Playground 
Recreation Commission 
Edwards Beach 
Park Dept-New Building 
East School 
Recreation Facilities Planning 

Total Recreation 



Insurance: 
Property & Liability 
Group Insurance 

Total Insurance 



Unclassified: 
Memorial Day 
Town Clock 
Ambulance Service 
Town & Finance Reports 
Unpaid Bills-Previous Years 
Regional Drug Program 
Crystal Lake Reconstruction 
Mental Health Program 
Liquid Waste Disposal 
Police Station Addition 
Roberts Playground-Site Work 
Fire Station Bldg. Com. 
Update Town History 
Merrimack Valley Home Center 
Library Addition Com. 
Central Sq. Eng. Fees 
Land Purchase-Warren 
Tennis Courts-South Row 
Water Dist. Consolidation Com. 
School Traffic Signals 
Police Mutual Aid 
Land Purchase-Conservation 
Reconstruct Crooked Spring Dam 
Purchase Emerson Property 
Restore Little Red Schoolhouse 
Water Main Install. Garrison Rd. 
Wetlands Aerial Mapping 
Bus Trans. Subsidy 
N.M.A.C. Assessment 
Glass Recycling 

Total Unclassified 



Cemeteries: 
Salaries 
Interments 
Labor for Lot Owners 
Repairs, Expense & Outlays 
Hot Top Roads 
Restore Old Cemeteries 
Beautification 
Garage Construction 
Purchase New Truck 

Total Cemetery Department 



114,430.30 
4,534.86 
8,148.57 

31,399.83 
7,086.40 
1,739.88 
9,220.00 

76,630.00 

253,189.84 



25,026.67 
10,116.29 
91,153.33 
499.57 
24,993.30 



124,246.04 
139,237.29 



120,093.32 
4,241.61 
9,605.40 
43,635.16 
7,447.96 
3,379.85 

20,489.50 

208,892.80 



24,690.13 

6,963.92 

107,141.52 



4,088.47 
50.80 



142,934.84 



148,466.90 
228,860.33 



377,327.23 



1,500.00 


1,481.95 


222.53 


494.45 


9,000.00 


9,999.96 


6,327.32 


4,679.68 




2,608.07 


18,860.00 


23,574.96 


42,905.81 


139,119.25 


5,217.00 


8,695.00 


3,519.54 


600.00 


42,251.45 




6,732.72 


10,373.46 


1,432.00 




800.00 




1,800.00 


1,800.00 


1,874.65 


6,175.35 


10,632.47 


1,270.24 


15,000.00 




27,000.00 




11,484.62 


6,403.50 


37,309.00 




300.00 


1,497.85 


50,000.00 


195,000.00 


17,100.00 






100,000.00 




6,000.00 




14,415.76 




5,000.00 


25,554.90 


30,283.28 




8,592.00 




1,333.53 



336,824.01 


579,398.29 


40,355.04 


46,077.05 


4,325.24 


4,500.00 


644.40 


700.00 


9,656.58 


10,370.10 


6,950.00 


7,420.00 


644.40 


797.04 


7,103.39 


6,260.10 




25,000.00 




6,047.00 


69,679.05 


107,171.29 



96 



Agency, Trusts Investment: 






Aid to Industrial Schools 


2,860.00 


21,564.00 


State & County Share 


10,090.02 


7,180.75 


Tuition & Transp. State Wards 


12,078.00 


12,078.00 


Fees & Licenses 






School Transportation Aid 


1,164,531.44 


960,783.18 


Payroll Deductions 


3,110,459.93 


3,830,368.94 


Aid to Public Libraries 


11,787.00 


11,787.00 


Retirement-Pension Expense 


240,250.61 


305,681.84 


Highway-Chapter 90 


27,608.04 


25,193.24 


State & County Assessments 


807,648.29 


658,020.33 


Highway-Chapter 81 


71,317.79 


159,098.35 


Cemetery Care Bequests & Int. 


12,056.56 


29,058.19 


Highway-Chapter 825 




229,166.59 


Tax Levy Refunds 


86,822.08 


76,861.65 


Lottery Distribution 


211,023.26 


194,146.19 


Performance Bonds 


2,710.00 


1,420.00 


Veterans' Benefits 


44,556.88 


48,071.51 


Trust Funds Invested 


20,250.00 


25,000.00 


EEA Reimbursement 


76.69 




From Misc. Trust Funds 


5,315.12 


5,749.91 


Conservation Grant 


11,000.00 




Water Districts-Liens 




2,791.75 


Title I 
Title IV 
Title VI 

Total Grants From State 




97,363.00 
23,547.55 


Total Agency, Trust & Investment 


4,295,602.61 
11,603.45 


4,942,133.36 
46.506.73 


60,000.00 


Interest- Loans: 


2,818,779.22 


3,309,178.32 


Anticipation of Bond Issue 




Bonded Debt 


568,332.50 


507,962.50 


Departmental Receipts 












Selectmen 
Treasurer/Collector 


700.55 
2,788.65 


1,476.70 


Total Interest 


579,935.95 


554,469.23 


5,014.15 








Town Clerk 
Assessors 


382.10 


710.20 
15.00 


Principal - Loans: 






Police Department 


9,694.02 


5,717.26 


Maturing Bond Debt 


1,410,000.00 


1,405,000.00 


Public Buildings 


1,752.50 


3,090.00 


Anticipation of Bond Issue 




1,100,000.00 


Highway 


39,057.65 


7,452.56 








Dog Officer 
Fire Department 
Misc. Departments 


366.00 

19.50 

14,344.24 


220.00 
376.60 


Total Principal 


1,410,000.00 


2,505,000.00 






24,798.40 


School Construction 


1,800,423.95 


599,161.11 


Veteran's Department 
School 
Cafeteria-Lunch Sales 


430,800.39 


1,959.70 








417,764.20 


Total Disbursements 


24,713,436.24 


27,711,875.99 


Tuition-Rents & Misc. 


28,955.21 


27,304.53 








Athletic Program 


15,106.89 


13,350.88 


CashBal. on Hand June 30, 1976 


4,096,992.89 


3,402,051.01 


Educational Collab. Fund 




17,525.00 








M.E.C. Revolving Fund 
Library 


259,909.49 


401,966.89 










Total 


28,810,429.13 


31.113,927.00 


Fines 


4,416.03 


5,093.48 


RECEIPTS 




Cemetery 
Sale of Lots & Graves 


5,150.00 


5,785.00 




1975 

360,251.04 


1976 

388,945.21 


Interments, Labor, Material 








& Use of Equipment 
Total Departmental Receipts 


12,315.00 


9.306.02 


General Revenue 
Taxes: 


825,758.22 


948,926.57 


Personal Property 






Real Estate 


9,619,652.79 


10,345,426.74 


Municipal Indebtedness 






Farm Animal Excise 


76.50 


883.95 


Anticipation of Bond Issue 


500,000.00 


800,000.00 


Motor Vehicle Excise 


1,387,977.23 


1,136,166.11 


Bond Issue-New High School 




1,200,000.00 


Tax Title Redemptions 


14,721.11 


16,540.96 


Premium on Bond Issue 
Interest 
Taxes 


17,536.90 


439.20 


Total Taxes 


11,382,678.67 


11,887,962.97 


25,842.09 








Deposits 


247,907.02 


82,227.31 


From State: 


8,269.00 


7,039.30 


Federal Rev. Sharing 
Total From Loans & Interest 


7,969.75 


10,782.95 


Tax Apportionment Basis 


773,413.67 


2,119,291.55 




37,309.00 


39,598.06 








School Aid & Special Education 


3,172.934.94 


3,712,493.28 








Trans. Aid Chap. 1140 


221,790.62 




Refunds 


20,176.97 


64,860.52 



Total Taxes From State 

Court Fines 

Permits, Fees & Licenses 

Alcoholic Licenses 

Total Fines & Permits 

Grants & Gifts: 
County 
Dog Licenses 
Highway Funds 

Total Grants From County 

Federal Government: 
Public Law 874 
Revenue Sharing Funds 
Title III 
Title II 

Total Grants From Federal Gov. 



State: 

School Building Assistance 
School Cafeteria Aid 



3,440,303.56 

2,852.05 
54,756.80 
18,143.26 



5,704.05 
9,434.99 



133,873.00 

329,802.00 

137,651.98 

21,160.52 

622,487.50 



1,117,244.05 
144,696 07 



3,759,130.64 

2,857.45 
68,263.53 
19,482.00 

90,602.98 



4,863.85 
21,175.67 



26,039.52 



125,205.77 

407,371.00 

220,580.00 

15,598.45 

768.755.22 



1,255,356.02 
211,023.69 



Agency, Trust & Investment 
Payroll-Withholding 
Tailings 

Cemetery Perpetual Care Interest 
Cemetery Perpetual Care Bequests 
Dog Licenses Due County 
Sunday Entertainment Licenses 
Due State 

Barris Cemetery Fund 
Conservation Fund 
Douglas Cemetery Fund 
Registry Fees Due State 
Library Trust Funds 
Barris Varney Playground Fund 
Cash In Lieu of Bonds 
Police Outside Details 
Water District Liens 
Veteran's Emergency Fund 

Total Agency, Trust & 
Investment Accounts 



Total Receipts 

CashBal. on Hand July 1, 1975 



Total 
97 



3.397,634.49 



23,372,123.45 
5,438,305.68 



28,810,429.13 



3,279,030.47 


3,857,451.73 


12,063.28 




5,871.86 


10,872.89 


10,000.00 


12,705.00 


8,493.10 


7,841.30 


800.00 


1,124.00 


1,000.00 


1,000.00 


865.00 


17,480.00 


2,985.15 


3,062.36 


123.00 


933.00 


2,480.00 


486.85 


250.00 


250.00 


500.00 


4,900.00 


73,172.62 


120,831.52 




2,791.75 




455.42 



27,016,934.11 
4,096,992.89 



31,113,927.00 



TOWN EMPLOYEES SALARIES 



Position 



Gross Pay 



Department: Assessors 






Position 


Regular Pay 


Gross Pay 


Assessor (Chairman) 


$15,344.28 


$15,344.28 


Assessor (Part Time) 


3,684.03 


3,684.03 


Assessor (Part Time) 


366.75 


366.75 


Assessor (Part Time Retired) 


2,906.52 


2,906.52 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.11 


8,144.11 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.11 


8,144.11 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.11 


8,144.11 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.11 


8,144.11 


Department: Election 






Position 




Gross Pay 


Clerk 




$ 63.75 


Clerk 




68.13 


Clerk 




28.75 


Clerk 




255.27 


Clerk 




48.75 


Clerk 




20.00 


Clerk 




80.63 


Clerk 




61.88 


Clerk 




102.19 


Clerk 




267.33 


Clerk 




23.75 


Clerk 




10.00 


Clerk 




43.76 


Clerk 




414.56 


Clerk 




83.76 


Clerk 




83.76 


Clerk 




245.63 


Clerk 




451.74 


Clerk 




76.88 


Clerk 




62.50 


Clerk 




35.63 


Clerk 




86.88 


Clerk 




41.25 


Clerk 




41.25 


Clerk 




256.95 


Clerk 




68.44 


Clerk 




154.08 


Clerk 




22.50 


Clerk 




103.75 


Clerk 




31.25 


Clerk 




50.00 


Clerk 




56.87 


Clerk 




25.00 


Clerk 




10.00 


Clerk 




7.50 


Clerk 




281.90 


Clerk 




256.90 


Clerk 




89.38 


Clerk 




80.63 


Clerk 




90.01 


Clerk 




83.76 


Clerk 




93.13 


Clerk 




246.95 


Clerk 




21.88 


Clerk 




287.87 


Clerk 




103.13 


Clerk 




267.28 


Clerk 




84.69 


Clerk 




70.31 



Clei 
Clei 
Clei 

Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Clei 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Clei 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 
Clei 
Clei 
Cle 
Cle 
Cle 



$94.69 

57.50 

60.00 

69.38 

69.38 

21.88 

93.12 

276.46 

85.63 

88.12 

73.76 

53.75 

61.25 

89.38 

11.25 

51.87 

264.85 

254.85 

87.51 

85.64 

102.50 

102.51 

244.50 

220.25 

51.25 

227.38 

81.88 

23.13 

75.31 

198.73 

97.51 

220.44 

87.51 

88.13 

87.51 

90.01 

60.00 

138.68 

101.57 

182.62 

114.79 

87.51 

33.75 

214.95 

467.17 

265.16 

50.63 

183.72 

93.12 

21.87 

77.50 

92.50 

110.63 

56.25 

56.25 

242.78 

120.01 

226.86 

90.94 

42.50 

47.63 

80.94 

12.50 

86.87 

40.00 

40.00 

27.50 

81.88 



98 



Position 



Gross Pay 



Position 



Gross Pay 



$23.75 
261.57 
246.91 
38.75 
95.64 
122.21 
40.62 
21.87 
37.50 
62.81 
112.81 
63.75 
57.19 
75.32 
15.00 
15.00 
25.00 
203.13 
23.75 
23.75 
103.13 
23.75 
10.62 
23.75 
38.75 
12.50 
25.00 
25.00 
83.75 
45.00 
45.00 
13.75 
12.50 
25.00 
32.50 
73.44 
32.50 
82.50 
38.75 
21.75 
8.75 
17.50 
60.63 
58.75 
48.75 
16.25 
31.25 
45.00 
314.25 
193.50 
132.88 
126.00 
59.70 
41.88 
71.88 
21.88 
75.00 
62.50 
25.00 
25.00 
141.26 
61.25 
199.50 
28.75 
76.88 
28.75 
58.75 



$36.25 
17.50 
52.50 
63.75 
61.25 
71.25 
36.25 
21.88 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
20.94 
19.38 
20.94 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
15.00 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
23.75 
13.75 
13.13 
13.75 
13.13 
13.75 
12.50 
35.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.00 
20.0G 
15.63 
15.63 
15.63 
15.63 
15.63 
15.63 
23.75 
12.50 
13.75 
13.75 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 
12.50 



99 



Position 



Gross Pay 



Clerk 






$12.50 


Clerk 






12.50 


Clerk 






12.50 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






13.75 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Clerk 






17.50 


Department: Cemetery 






Position 


Regular Pay 


Overtime Pay 


Gross Pay 


Superintendent 


13,256.86 




13,256.86 


Foreman 


11,627.20 


2,049.33 


13,676.53 


Backhoe Oper. 


9,837.60 


2,567.77 


12,405.37 


Gardener 


8,975.20 


2,070.19 


11,045.39 


Laborer 


2,918.04 


123.20 


3,041.24 



Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Junior Assistant* 

Clerk 

Clerk* 

Clerk* 

Aide* 

Aide* 

Aide* 

Aide* 

Aide* 

Aide* 

Maintenance 

Maintenance* 

Maintenance* 

* = Part Time 



4,182.90 

3,743.47 

3,488.51 

3,310.23 

3,129.36 

3,050.31 

2,560.05 

1,654.82 

1,487.35 

1,396.64 

1,189.04 

797.82 

735.37 

468.14 

426.38 

374.70 

157.04 

6,884.80 

4,269.56 

1,953.24 

1,156.72 

766.25 

666.52 

395.72 

281.75 

202.25 

8,392.80 

2,419.45 

1,020.11 



232.43 
63.60 



4,182.90 

3,743.47 

3,488.51 

3,310.23 

3,129.36 

3,050.31 

2,560.05 

1,654.82 

1,487.35 

1,396.64 

1,189.04 

797.82 

735.37 

468.14 

426.38 

374.70 

157.04 

6,884.80 

4,269.56 

1,953.24 

1,156.72 

766.25 

666.52 

395.72 

281.75 

202.25 

8,625.23 

2,419.45 

1,083.71 



Department: Board of Health 

Position 

Chairman, Board of Health 

Board Member 

Board Member 

Director 

Senior Clerk 

Senior Clerk 

P.T. Clerk 

Board Physician 

Board Physician 



Regular Pay 

$ 291.00 

264.00 

273.00 

18,524.51 

3,080.40 

3,447.71 

534.40 

500.00 

500.00 



Department: Park Department 

Position 

Superintendent 
P.T. Landscaper 
P.T. Laborer 
P.T. Laborer 
P.T. Laborer 
P.T. Laborer 



Regular Pay 

$13,252.20 

3,182.71 

1,349.63 

1,700.35 

38.10 

194.55 



Gross Pay 

$13,252.20 

3,182.71 

1,349.63 

1,700.35 

38.10 

194.55 



Department: Library 

Position Regular Pay Overtime 



Gross Pay 



Director 


$15,079.40 


$15,079.40 


Assistant Director 


10,412.73 


10,412.73 


Branch Librarian 


8,772.45 


8,772.45 


Senior Assistant 


7,476.50 


7,476.50 


Senior Assistant 


7,242.04 


7,242.04 


Senior Assistant 


7,146.88 


7,146.88 


Senior Assistant 


5,994.13 


5,994.13 


Junior Assistant 


4,630.47 


4,630.47 



Department: Recreation Commission 

Position 

Director of Summer Program 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Director 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 



Gross Pay 

$1,170 
540 
540 
540 
540 
480 
480 
480 
480 
480 
480 
480 
480 



100 



Playground Supervisor 
Playground Supervisor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Sports Instructor 
Administrative Ass't/Clerk 



420 
420 
800 
600 
600 
560 
640 
680 
350 
150 
3,500 



Department: Treasurer 



Position 



Regular Pay Overtime Gross Pay 



Treasurer-Collector $16,956.04 



Asst. Treasurer 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Sr. Clerk 
Clerk P/T 
Clerk P/T 
Clerk P/T 
Clerk P/T 



8,751.59 
7,819.96 
8,144.36 
4,761.96 
815.40 
4,875.03 
6,068.20 
54.72 
1,414.40 
2,283.18 
2,240.10 



$25.92 
38.88 
25.92 
12.08 



$16,956.04 
8,751.59 
7,845.88 
8,183.24 
4,787.88 
827.48 
4,875.03 
6,068.20 
54.72 
1,414.40 
2,283.18 
2,240.10 



Department: Selectmen's 

Position Regular Pay Overtime Gross Pay 



Chairman-Selectmen 
Selectman 
Selectman 
Selectman 
Selectman 
Administrative Ass't 
Senior Clerk 
Part-Time Clerk 
Town Planner 
Purchasing Agent 



,144.36 $358.37 



Department: Town Clerk/Registrar 
Position Regular Pay Overtime Other 



$ 1,368.05 

1,131.91 

999.96 

999.96 

999.96 

11,320.61 

8,502.73 

2,921.33 

127.62 

1,018.86 



Gross Pay 



Town Clerk 


$11,933.78 




$ 850.00 $12,783.78 


Sr. Clerk (T) 


3,624.00$ 


128.68 


2,174.40 


5,927.08 


Sr. Clerk 


8,144.36 


662.96 




8,807.32 


Sr. Clerk 


5,913.16 


395.52 




6,308.68 


P.T. Clerk 


1,152.54 






1,152.54 


P.T. Clerk 


1,320.12 






1,320.12 


P.T. Clerk 


3,772.09 


91.20 




3,863.29 


Registrar 


360.00 






360.00 


Registrar 


360.00 






360.00 


Registrar 


360.00 






360.00 



Department: Varney Playground Commission 

Position 

Part-Time Maintenance Workers 

#1 

#2 

#3 

#4 

#5 

#6 

#7 

#8 

#9 

#10 

#11 

#12 

#13 

#14 

#15 



Gross Pay 



$389.00 

319.00 

198.00 

183.00 

140.00 

129.50 

121.00 

109.00 

102.00 

75.00 

69.00 

29.00 

26.00 

20.00 

11.50 



Department: Town Hall 

Position 

Building Inspector 

Wiring Inspector 

Gas Inspector 

Plumbing Inspector 

Town Counsel 

Veterans' Agent 

Moderator 

Constable 

Supt. of Insect & Pest Control 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 

Finance Committee Clerk 

School Building Committee Clerk 

Planning Board Clerk 

Planning Board Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Conservation Commission Clerk 

Board of Appeals Clerk 

Recreation Commission Clerk 

Personnel Board Clerk 

Historic District Commission Clerk 

Sewer Commission Clerk 

Home Rule Advisory Committee Clerk 

Dog Officer 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Assistant Dog Officer 

Clerk of Works-School Building Committee 

Custodian 

Town Aide 

Recreation Director 



Gross Pay 

$16,439.91 

9,474.42 

3,124.98 

1,050.00 

500.00 

9,771.59 

300.00 

120.00 

1,025.00 

2,000.00 

1,085.60 

756.96 

1,980.12 

643.20 

973.60 

943.92 

778.08 

2,342.12 

2,838.60 

419.06 

188.10 

510.91 

130.45 

7,129.53 

1,124.41 

222.65 

4,780.06 

21,200.00 

7,602.40 

8,285.60 

238.58 



$36,940.05 $1,278.36 $3,024.40 $41,242.81 



101 



DEPARTMENT: Highway 

POSITION 



REGULAR 
PAY 



Superintendent of 
Administrative Ass 
Clerk (Part Time) 
Foreman 

Assistant Foreman 
Grader Operator 
Mechanic, Heavy Eq 
Mechanic, Heavy Eq 



Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 
Class 



Engineer 
Engineer 
Engineer 
Engineer 
Engineer 
Engineer 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 

- Specia 
Specia 
Specia 
Specia 



Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Skilled) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer (Waste) 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer 
Laborer, Waste 



Streets 
istant 



uipment 
uipment 
ng Equ 
ng Equ 
ng Equ 
ng Equ 
ng Equ 
ng Equ 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 
Eq. Op 



pment Op. 

pment Op, 

pment Op, 

pment Op. 

pment Op, 

pment Op. 

Tr. Dr, 

Tr. Dr, 

Tr. Dr, 

Tr. Dr. 



Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 
Tr. 



Dr, 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 
Dr. 



H'way 
H'way 
H 'way 
H 'way 
H 'way 
H'way 
H'way 
H'way 
H'way 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 
Waste 



$19 
9 

15 
11 
11 
10 

6 
11 

9 
11 
11 
11 
11 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 

9 

9 
10 
10 
10 
10 
10 



773.51 
317.09 
692.59 
301.60 
627.20 
627.20 
226.72 
304.80 
175.20 
893.26 
169.60 
169.60 
190.70 
169.60 
285.60 
359-49 
285.60 
351.52 
519.24 
285.60 
370.34 
741.98 
558.58 
285.60 
285.60 
285.60 
285.60 
285.60 
893.64 
629.14 
425.60 
416.53 
759.84 
331.85 
860.44 
820.88 
361.27 
662.28 
607.37 
358.38 
892.00 
776.48 
623.77 
935.92 
573.80 
247.20 
278.08 
341.84 
759.20 
188.48 
970.88 
470.48 
8^2.04 
777.92 



OVERTIME 
PAY 



$3,183.78 

2,057.23 

2,884.29 

1,846.21 

1,320.00 

1,533.45 

723.60 

734.07 

1,588.10 

1,786.44 

400.78 

1,854.21 

2,232.17 

1,870.72 

772.85 

2,054.59 

2,666.20 

1,056.07 

1,463.99 

975.65 

845.80 

786.05 

764.16 

881.24 

850.58 

1,258.55 

1,470.40 

1,518.89 

1,109.56 

446.14 

595.87 

252.95 

628.51 

501.64 

396.58 

1,296.36 

735.70 

731.11 

509.66 

2,456.67 

1,268.92 

825.75 

124.72 

57.25 

1,085.06 

58.90 

914.34 

1,269.98 

1,408.46 

296.07 

35.36 



OTHER 



$785.91 



GROSS PAY 



$20 
9 

16 

13 

14 

12 

7 

12 

10 

11 

12 

12 

11 

12 

12 

12 

11 

12 

12 

11 

11 

10 

11 

11 

11 

11 

11 

10 

10 

9 

9 

9 

7 

7 

9 

8 

9 

9 

9 

9 

9 

12 

9 

9 



102 



POSITION 



Laborer, 

Laborer, 

Laborer, 

Laborer, 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 

Laborer 



Waste 

Waste 

Waste 

Waste 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 
(Seasonal ) 



REGULAR 
PAY 

813.28 

3,631.44 

4,065.29 

5,780.32 

1,040.48 

994.24 

1,052.48 

1,057.28 

724.48 

972.40 

954.72 

1,033.92 

1,017.52 

990.08 



OVERTIME 
PAY 

35.36 

114.92 
407.19 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 

848.64 
3,631.44 
4,180.21 

6,187.51 

1,040.48 

994.24 

1,052.48 

1,057.28 

724.48 

972.40 

954.72 

1,033.92 

1,017.52 

990.08 



103 



DEPARTMENT: Fire 












POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME PAY 


LONGEVITY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


Chief 


$26,194.63 




$3,147.95 


$972.70 


$30,315.2 


Deputy Chief 


20,525.18 




2,394.50 


865.52 


23,785.3 


Capta in 


15,069.76 


$3,524.76 


452.39 


698.31 


19,745.2 


Capta in 


15,071.78 


3,512.04 


1,625.16 


698.31 


20,907.2 


Capta in 


15,219.76 


4,935.86 


452.39 


698.31 


21,306.3 


Capta in 


15,069.76 


5,215-76 


1,804.62 


698.31 


22,788.4 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,283.99 


1,180.13 


606.95 


17,168.9 


Fire Fighter 


13,097-83 


2,946.87 


379.03 


606.95 


17,030.6 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,661.42 


1,180.13 


606.95 


18,546.3 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,455.31 


977.67 


606.95 


18,137.7 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,647.26 


181.20 


606.95 


16,533.2 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,866.50 


786.20 


606.95 


17,357.4 


Fire Fighter 


12,435.84 


3,112.42 


- 


569.38 


16,117.6 


Fire Fighter 


1,496.62 


- 


- 


- 


1,496.6 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,346.13 


392.45 


606.95 


17,443.3 


Fire Fighter 


12,812.56 


3,667.12 


- 


593.69 


17,073.3 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,006.84 


786.20 


606.95 


17,497.8 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,064.46 


379.03 


606.95 


17,148.2 


r ire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,310.17 


1 ,180.19 


606.95 


18,195.1 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,195.67 


786.20 


606.95 


17,686.6 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,441.49 


392.45 


606.95 


17,538.7 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,611.64 


1,180.13 


606.95 


17,496.5 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,698.98 


392.44 


606.95 


16,796.2 


r ire Fighter 


12,493.35 


3,205.61 


- 


569.38 


16,268.3 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,162.07 


970.42 


606.95 


17,837.2 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,210.99 


392.44 


606.95 


17,308.2 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,706.00 


181.20 


606.95 


16,591.9 


r ire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,028.32 


1,180.31 


606.95 


17,913.4 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,670.22 


392.44 


606.95 


17,767.4 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,033.86 


392.44 


606.95 


17,131.0 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,219.50 


786.20 


606.95 


17,710.4 


r ire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,807.50 


392.44 


606.95 


16,904.7 


Fire Fighter 


1,496.62 


- 


- 


- 


1,496.6 


-ire Fighter 


1,496.62 


- 


- 


- 


1,496.6 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,118.39 


181.20 


606.95 


17,004.3 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,024.81 


392.44 


606.95 


16,122.0 


Fire Fighter 


5,910.40 


180.09 


- 


263.40 


6,353.8 


Fire Fighter 


1,496.62 


- 


- 


- 


1,496.6 


Fire Fighter 


1,496.62 


- 


- 


- 


1,496.6 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,342.91 


392.44 


606.95 


16,440.1 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,365.75 


392.44 


606.95 


17,462.9 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,140.44 


180.65 


606.95 


17,025.8 


Fire Fighter 


12,493.35 


3,103.74 


- 


569.38 


16,166.4 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,831.80 


1 ,179.61 


606.95 


17,716.1 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,290.67 


1,180.13 


606.95 


18,175.5 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,437.50 


392.44 


606.95 


17,534.7 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,171.47 


894.92 


606.95 


17,771.1 


Fire Fighter 


12,962.56 


3,177.59 


- 


593.69 


16,733.8 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,479.32 


392.44 


606.95 


17,576.5 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,029.46 


- 


606.95 


16,734.2 


Fire Fighter 


12,343.35 


3,321.83 


- 


569.38 


16,234.5 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,217.13 


380.38 


606.95 


17,302.2 



104 



POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME PAY 


LONGEVITY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


2,207.^9 


392.44 


606.95 


16,304.71 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,161.59 


379.03 


606.95 


17,245.40 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,112.86 


786.20 


606.95 


17,603.84 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,217.40 


786.20 


606.95 


17,708.18 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,813.95 


1,180.19 


606.95 


18,698.92 


Fire Fighter 


13,097.83 


3,039.49 - 


- 


606.95 


16,744.27 


Senior Clerk 


8,143.20 


- 


75.81 


- 


8,219.01 



105 



DEPARTMENT: 


Pol ice 






(NOT PAID 
















BY TOWN) 






POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME PAY 


LONGEVITY 


OUTSIDE 
DETAILS 


*0THER 


GROSS PAY 


Chief 


$26,162.06 


$ 


$2,339.19 


$ 


$1,005.70 


$29,506.95 


Capta in 


20,525.96 


- 


2,452.17 


- 


865.52 


23 


,843.65 


Sergeant 


15,049-^^ 


2,098.01 


1,794.25 


6,246.27 


717.01 


25 


,904.98 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


4,217.87 


879.33 


350.45 


717.01 


21 


214.10 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


2,707.81 


1,345.39 


2,987.15 


632.27 


22 


722.06 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


3,749.25 


897.70 


5,252.74 


2,061.31 


27 


010.44 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


4,600.32 


447.69 


4,821.54 


2,087.97 


27 


006.96 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


4,429.86 


897.70 


- 


717.01 


21 


,094.01 


Sergeant 


15,049.44 


5,885.60 


883.85 


4,212.99 


1,412.97 


27 


444.85 


Patrolman 


12,102.64 


3,920.17 


- 


2,148.25 


1,026.52 


19 


197.58 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


4,747.58 


389.29 


3,636.05 


599.84 


22 


453.80 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


203.31 


1,161.92 


1,230.80 


597.98 


16 


275.05 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


5,948.82 


389.29 


1,839.10 


623.22 


21 


881.47 


Patrolman 


12,109.51 


6,914.57 


- 


2,688.45 


958.14 


22 


670.67 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


161.01 


1,011.52 


1,827.60 


549.58 


16 


630.75 


Patrolman 


11,589.70 


4,550.82 


- 


2,176.45 


1,273.98 


19 


590.95 


Patrolman 


13,072.94 


6,396.40 


- 


2,914.50 


1,072.92 


23 


456.76 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


758.84 


755.90 


3,055.55 


623.22 


18 


274.55 


Patrolman 


12,095.62 


5,562.06 


- 


2,585.30 


555.16 


20 


798.14 


Patrolman 


12,097.66 


5,522.45 


- 


1,237.42 


508.14 


19 


365.67 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


2,946.68 


371.05 


- 


1,348.22 


17 


746.99 


Patrolman 


13,030.56 


237.34 


1,169.02 


2,450.05 


574.60 


17 


461.57 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


2,864.49 


1,169.02 


896.50 


599.84 


18 


610.89 


Patrolman 


12,100.30 


1,194.89 


- 


- 


533.80 


13 


828.99 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


589.57 


1,166.52 


1,341.00 


599.84 


16 


777.97 


Patrolman 


10,052.24 


5,477.61 


104.19 


3,312.85 


1,123.14 


20 


070.03 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


8,633.72 


1,169.02 


7,193.84 


623.22 


30 


700.84 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


5,551.16 


779.73 


1,417.95 


621.58 


21 


451.46 


Patrolman 


10,045.70 


5,928.38 


- 


3,777.56 


358.38 


20 


110.02 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


10,162.91 


389.29 


1,744.50 


623.22 


26 


000.96 


Patrolman 


12,851.27 


6,184.41 


211.17 


1,505.80 


538.63 


21 


291.28 


Patrolman 


12,109.36 


5,635.29 


- 


2,456.60 


508.14 


20 


709.39 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


5,630.99 


779.73 


4,835.17 


597.98 


24 


924.91 


Patrolman 


12,994.08 


3,131.75 


779.73 


- 


623.22 


17 


528.78 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


3,381.24 


348.65 


362.40 


1,073.22 


18 


246.55 


Patrolman 


12,385.44 


6,546.24 


- 


4,131.78 


585.24 


23 


648.70 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


7,483.33 


389.29 


5,495.63 


623.22 


27 


072.51 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


7,418.00 


389.29 


5,302.39 


599.84 


26 


790.56 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


5,569.69 


389.29 


1,794.10 


597.98 


21 


432.10 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


3,816.40 


779-73 


4,227.65 


623.22 


22 


528.04 


Patrolman 


11,728.51 


8,834.36 


- 


1,053.38 


531.60 


22 


147.85 


Patrolman 


13,069.94 


9,510.80 


- 


3,625.26 


597.68 


26 


803.68 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


- 


173.65 


- 


549.58 


13 


804.27 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


6,562.10 


389.29 


2,535.52 


574.82 


23 


142.77 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


6,183.31 


768.48 


1,885.40 


897.98 


22 


816.21 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


7,054.80 


389.29 


3,917.35 


623.22 


25 


065.70 


Patrolman 


13,081.04 


6,209.76 


389.29 


3,684.61 


551.22 


23 


915.92 


Patrolman 


10,863.88 


1.85 


311.35 


- 


456.02 


11 


633.10 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.80 


- 


- 


- 


- 


8 


144.80 


Senior Clerk 


8,144.80 


- 


242. 50 


- 


- 


8 


387.30 


Custod ian 


7,461.20 


- 


- 


- 


- 


7 


461.20 


Intrm. Ptrlm. 


- 


- 


- 


- 


48.90 




48.90 



106 



(NOT PAID 
BY TOWN) 

POSITION REGULAR PAY OVERTIME PAY LONGEVITY OUTSIDE *OTHER GROSS PAY 

DETAILS 

Intrm. Ptrlm. - - - - 38.00 38.00 

Intrm. Ptrlm. - 2,024.13 2,024.13 

Intrm. Ptrlm. - - - - 97.56 97.56 

Intrm. Ptrlm. - - - - 38.00 38.00 

Matron - - - - 529.93 529.93 

Matron - - - 16.64 16.64 

Matron - 115-71 115-71 

Matron - 1,203-61 1,203-61 

School Traffic - - - 775.40 775-40 

School Traffic - - - 36.90 36.90 

School Traffic - 1,664.44 1,664.44 

School Traffic - 602.70 602.70 

School Traffic ------ 1,951.74 1,951.74 

School Traffic - - 1,531.66 1,531.66 

School Traffic - 16.40 16.40 

School Traffic - 20.50 20.50 

*Hol idays £ Educational Incentive - Intrm. Ptrlm., Matrons, School Traffic. 



107 



DEPARTMENT: School 

POSITION 
Administrat ion 



Superintendent 

Asst. Supt. 

Dir. of Personnel 

Dir. of Spec. Services 

Dir. of School Management 

Attendance Officer 

Supervisors 

Foreign Language 

Guidance 

Art 

Career Ed. 

Music 

Coord, of Science 

Coord, of Math 

Coord, of Social Studies 

Asst. Coord, of LA in charge 

of Reading 
Coord, of LA 
Coord, of PE 

High School Administration 

Principal 

Asst. Principal 

Dean 

Dean 

Dean 

Dean 



High 


School Teachers 


Read 


ing 


Read 


ing 


Read 


ing 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 


Engl 


ish 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


34,424.70 




34,424.70 


27,976.84 




27,976.84 


18,859.77 


19.41 


18,879.18 


24,71^.95 




24,714.95 


21,312.99 




21,312.99 


16,476.61 




16,476.61 


18,547.03 




18,547.03 


20,326.14 




20,326.14 


19,145.37 


-793.35 


18,325.02 


18,547.03 




18,547.03 


20,326.14 




20,326.14 


19,470.07 


505.08 


19,975.15 


6,947.85 


634.76 


7,582.61 


22,247.73 




22,247.73 


6,757.08 


2,561.67 


9,318.75 


10,481.41 


91.14 


10,663.69 


21,025.83 




21,025.83 


25,863.10 




25,863.10 


23,482.09 




23,482.09 


20,046.46 




20,046.46 


20,070.12 


-91.78 


20,161.90 


11,202.85 




11 ,202.85 


19,906.56 




19,906.56 


17,613.32 




17,613.32 


14,046.15 


2,543.04 


16,689.19 


7,743.04 


2,273.20 


10,016.24 


6,228.89 


1,716.12 


7,945.01 


12,951.22 


2,222.58 


15,173.80 


12,198.56 


2,076.12 


14,272.68 


13,962.32 


2,212.28 


16,174.60 


12,512.96 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


16,062.75 


183.20 


16,245.95 


12,763.12 


2,115.16 


14,878.28 


11,258.69 


1,986.12 


13,224.81 


12,961.13 


2,192.90 


15,154.03 


11,938.09 


28,89 


11,966.98 


10,949.64 


2,044.44 


12,994.08 


8,987.16 


1,536.12 


10,523.31 


10,276.52 


1,806.12 


12,082.64 


13,583.03 


2,453.20 


16,036.23 


8,289.88 


1,446.12 


9,736.00 


10,586.52 


1 ,806.12 


12,392.64 


14,046.15 


2,543.04 


16,589.19 


8,681.19 


1 ,536.12 


10,217.31 



108 





POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


High School Teachers (cont'd) 


11,281.32 


1,896.12 


13,177.44 


Engl ish 




12,686.80 




12,686.80 




3,628.00 




3,628.00 


Engl ish 
Engl ish 
Engl ish 




13,559.55 


2,453.20 


16,012.75 




9,348.51 


1,475.41 


10,823.92 


Engl ish 




13,931.89 


2,499.36 


16,432.00 


Business 




12,228.24 


2,076.12 


14,304.36 


Business 




10,630.00 


111.58 


10,741.58 


Bus iness 




9,079.69 


1,719.63 


10,799.32 


Business 




10,682.32 


1,896.12 


12,578.44 


Business 




5,449.86 


810.81 


6,260.67 


Business 




14,784.76 


-160.80 


14,625.16 


Business 




16,396.78 


18.00 


16,414.78 


Business 




14,785.76 




14,785.76 


Busfness 




2,866.72 


2,062.70 


4,929.42 


Business 










Foreign 


Language 


14,370.24 




14,370.24 


Foreign 


Language 


9,823.50 




9,823.50 


Foreign 


Language 


13,747.40 


2,453.20 


18,200.60 


Foreign 


Language 


2,866.72 




2,866.72 


Foreign 


Language 


8,689.88 


1,578.12 


10,268.00 


Foreign 


Language 


4,198.72 




4,198.72 


Foreign 


Language 


11,865.92 


2,109.12 


13,975.04 


Foreign 


Language 


12,023.62 


2,126.78 


14,150.40 


Foreign 


Language 


13,709.37 


2,453.20 


16,162.57 


Foreign 


Language 


5,890.59 


1 ,716.12 


7,606.71 


Foreign 


Language 


9,696.97 


1,716.12 


11 ,413.09 


Foreign 


Language 


10,455-37 


1,806.12 


12,261.49 


Foreign 


Language 


11,088.12 


1 ,986.12 


13,074.24 


Foreign 


Language 


1,421.20 




1,421.20 


Math 




9,248.95 


1,626.12 


10,875.07 


Math 




16,169.09 


462.00 


16,631.09 


Math 




12,686.80 


267.00 


12,953.80 


Math 




13,701.20 


2,274.12 


15,975.32 


Math 




12,578.44 




12,578.44 


Math 




9,326.84 




9,326.84 


Math 




13,489.55 


2,453.20 


15,942.75 


Math 




13,864.55 


2,453.20 


16,317.75 


Math 




10,497.71 


1,894.78 


12,392.49 


Math 




11 ,088.12 


1,915.96 


13,004.08 


Math 




11,869.71 


1,422.09 


13,291.80 


Math 




10,984.66 


1,942.28 


12,926.94 


Math 




10,682.32 


1,896.12 


12,578.44 


Math 




13,807.31 


112.50 


13,919.81 


Math 




8,289.88 


1,446.12 


9,736.00 


Mus ic 




12,648.56 


2,076.12 


14,724.68 


Music 




5,042.52 


1,446.12 


6,488.64 


Music 




2,585.80 




2,585.80 


Music 




14,595.72 


2,453.20 


17,048.92 


Art 




14,785.76 




14,785-76 


Art 




10,983.34 


1,496.52 


12,479.86 


Art 




11,881.24 


2,076.12 


13,957.36 



109 



POSITION 

High School Teachers (cont'd) 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 



Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 



Stud ies 
Studies 
Stud ies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Stud ies 
Studies 
Studies 
Stud ies 
Studies 
Stud ies 
Studies 
Stud ies 
Studies 



Home Economics 
Home Economics 

Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 
Industrial Arts 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


17,675.75 




17,675.75 




229.53 


229.53 


7,079.36 


323.52 


7,402.88 


15,715.6*4 




15 


715.64 


335.86 


109.53 




445.39 


3,710.25 


26.00 


3 


736.25 


11,428.95 


1,626.12 


13 


055.07 


13,447.40 


2,166.12 


15 


613.52 


14,006.80 




14 


006.80 


6,643.68 


980.64 


7 


624.32 


16,739-55 


2,453.20 


19 


192.75 


12,270.68 


1,929.87 


14 


200.55 


2,866.72 




2 


866.72 


7,616.86 


1,364.40 


8 


981.26 


7,729.72 


1,359.12 


9 


088.84 


8,960.84 




8 


960.84 


15,942.75 




15 


942.75 


5,360.22 


1,155.93 


6 


516.15 


10,565.47 


1,852.28 


12 


417.75 


8,249.92 


1,467.12 


9 


717.04 


8,579.77 


1,545^ 8 


10 


125.25 


13,158.46 


2,346.12 


15 


504.58 


11,923.60 


2,076.12 


13 


§99.72 


13,747.40 


2,453.20 


16 


200.60 


12,434.58 


2,307.44 


14 


742.02 


15,335.51 




15 


335.51 


12,238.56 


2,076.12 


14 


314.68 


14,663.41 




14 


663.41 


16,281.25 




16 


281.25 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14 


785.76 


14,738.22 


18.00 


14 


756.22 


9,649.93 


1,556.04 


11 


205-97 


14,631.89 


2,499.36 


17 


131.25 


13,869.57 


2,499-36 


16 


368.93 


14,098.16 


2,273.20 


16 


371.36 


15,942.75 




15 


942.75 


1 ,298.88 


1,183.00 


2 


481.88 


15,127.32 




15 


127.32 


14,255-55 


2,453.20 


16 


708.75 


13,143.54 


2,302.28 


15 


445.82 


9,838.57 


1 ,716.12 


11 


554.69 


7,985.04 


1,356.12 


9 


341.16 


6,849.81 


1,986.12 


8 


835.93 


10,790.68 


1,912.37 


12 


703.05 


13,351.24 


2,346.12 


15 


697.36 


7,996.03 


1,190.72 


9 


186.75 


14,999.33 


36.09 


15 


035.42 


14,785.76 




14 


785.76 


12,994.24 


2,183.84 


15 


178.08 


14,107.17 


2,497.68 


16 


604.85 


13,947.56 


2,514.76 


16 


462.32 



110 



POSITION 



REGULAR PAY 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



High School Teachers (cont'd) 
Industiral Arts 
Industrial Arts 

Work Study 

Librarian 
Librarian 

Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 

Distributive Education 

Parker Junior High 
Pr inci pal 
Asst. Principal 

Parker - Teachers 



Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng' 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Eng 


ish 


Engl 


ish 



Reading 
Read ing 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

For. Lang, 

Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 



712.63 
757.81 

306.20 

783.21 
255.37 

801.20 
352.45 
813.74 
706.20 
489.55 
706.20 
567.89 
948.60 

579.36 



2,334.76 



2,433-20 

1,943.14 
1,806.12 

2,256.12 
1,626.12 

2,453.20 
2,453.20 
2,453.20 
2,346.12 
2,076.12 



24,942.55 




24 


21,979.51 




21 


6,662.07 


-312.96 


6 


12,801.20 


2,256.12 


15 


11,818.24 


1,914.36 


13 


11,773.60 


1,995.24 


13 


2,966.72 


2,133.00 


6 


8,831.19 


1,536.12 


10 


8,681.19 


1,535.12 


10 


13,224.81 




13 


13,489.55 


2,453.20 


15 


10,317.31 




10 


11,602.24 


2,076.12 


13 


13,489.55 


2,453.20 


15 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14 


3,814.28 




3 


10,255.37 


1,806.12 


12 


9,696.97 


1,734.12 


11 


11,238.69 


1,845.80 


13 


10,245.20 


1 ,638.02 


11 


10,255.37 


1 ,806.12 


12 


13,182.47 


2,166.12 


15 


8,664.88 


1 ,482.12 


10 


10,711.00 


6.00 


10 


15,942.75 




15 


10,196.97 


1 ,716.12 


11 


10,255.37 


1 ,806.12 


12 


10,790.68 


1,896.12 


12 



111 



POSITION 

Parker - Teachers (cont'd) 

Math 

Math 

Music 
Music 
Music 

Art 
Art 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 

Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 
Social Studies 

Home Ec. 
Home Ec. 
Home Ec. 

Ind. Arts 
Ind. Arts 
Ind. Arts 

Librarian 

Guidance Coun. 
Guidance Coun. 
Guidance Coun. 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


11,773.60 


2,076.12 


13,849.72 


11,818.24 


1,732.58 


13,550.82 


8,464.88 


1,491.82 


9,956.70 


9,871.97 


1,842.12 


11 ,714.09 


13,889.55 


2,453.20 


16,342.75 


3,057.20 




3,057.20 


7,604.72 


1 ,356.12 


8,960.84 


4,518.09 


78,75 


4,596.83 


3,940.02 




3,940.02 


15,690.81 




15,690.81 


14,451.24 


2,348.19 


16,799.43 


14,200.00 


2,453.20 


16,653.20 


15,697.36 




15,697.36 


13,971.22 




13,971.22 


12,801.20 


2,256.12 


15,057.32 


11,684.76 


1,986.12 


13,670.88 


8,339.?8 


1,458.12 


9,804.00 


16,200.60 




16,200.60 


10,375.37 


1,806.12 


12,181.49 


11,318.6? 


1 ,992.12 


13,310.81 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


12,329.97 


1,997.64 


14,327.61 


13,289.79 


2,256.12 


15,545.91 


6,246.81 


1,806.12 


8,052.93 


2,669.54 




2,669.54 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


12,287.40 


2,166.12 


14,453-52 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


2,866.72 




2,866.72 


11,238.69 


1,986.12 


13,224.81 


2,010.24 




2,010.24 


16,486.27 




16,486.27 


16,589.19 




16,589.19 


11,294.36 


1,996.03 


13,290.36 


9,081.19 


1,536.12 


10,617.31 


8,960.84 




8,960.84 


11,304.12 


1,775.64 


13,079.76 


8,763.63 


1,597.68 


10,361.31 


13,551.40 


2,407.68 


15,959.08 


8,590.04 


1,507.68 


10,097.72 


12,801.20 


2,256.12 


15,057.32 


3,247.36 




3,247.36 


3,247.36 




3,247.36 


5,229.45 


1 ,427.60 


6,657.05 



112 



Parker 



POSITION 
Teachers (cont'd] 



Gu idance 


Coun . 






Guidance 


Coun. 






McCarthy 


Junior 


H 


gh 


Principa 








Asst. Principal 






McCarthy 


- Teac 


ners 



Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 
Eng 



Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 



For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 
For. 

Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 
Math 

Music 



Lang, 
Lang, 
Lang , 
Lang, 
Lang , 
Lang, 
Lang, 
Lang, 
Lang, 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


10,360.22 


1,716.12 


12,076.34 


5,788.96 


1,270.52 


8,059.48 


25,066.01 




25,066.01 


21,856.05 




21 ,856.05 


8,289.88 


1 ,446.12 


9,736.00 


11 


032.26 


-393.02 


10 


039-24 


11 


304.12 


2,004.12 


13 


308.24 


15 


980.37 




15 


980.37 


14 


539-55 


2,653.20 


17 


192.75 


11 


304.12 


1,986.12 


13 


290.24 


9 


248.95 


1,626.12 


10 


875.07 


13 


224.81 




13 


224.81 


13 


224.81 




13 


224.81 


12 


801.20 


2,256.12 


15 


057.32 


11 


773.60 


2,076.12 


13 


849.72 


13 


351.24 


2,346.12 


15 


727.36 


9 


598.95 


1,626.12 


11 


225.07 


10 


790.68 


1,896.12 


12 


686.80 


9 


591.04 


1,716.12 


11 


307.16 


13 


872.40 


2,453.20 


16 


325.60 


9 


352.45 


1,632.12 


10 


984.57 


11 


238.69 


1,986.12 


13 


224.81 


2 


866.72 




2 


866.72 


11 


911.64 




11 


911.64 


6 


591.96 


1,426.80 


8 


018.76 


10 


097.64 




10 


097.64 


3 


057.20 




3 


057.20 


11 


332.97 


1 ,896.12 


13 


229.09 


11 


413.09 




11 


413.09 


8 


681.19 


1,536.12 


10 


217.21 


3 


818.08 


2,382.60 


6 


200.68 


13 


880.88 




13 


880.88 


14 


458.91 


2,637.84 


17 


096.75 


12 


686.80 




12 


686.80 


12 


801.20 


2,256.12 


15 


057.32 


11 


290.68 


1,896.12 


13 


186.80 


2 


866.72 




2 


866.72 


5 


118.12 


778.38 


5 


896.50 


12 


879.59 


33.50 


12 


913.09 


13 


489.55 


2,453.20 


15 


942.75 


10 


255.37 


1 ,806.12 


12 


061.49 


3 


057.20 


2,199.80 


5 


257.00 


3 


818.08 




3 


818.08 


10 


979-62 


95.14 


11 


074.76 


5 


620.95 


1 ,626.12 


7 


247.07 


11.313.69 


1 ,986.12 


13,299.81 


113 











McCarthy 



POSITION 
Teachers (cont'd) 



Music 
Music 

Art 
Art 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Phys. Ed. 

Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 
Science 



Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 
Socia 



Studies 
Stud ies 
Stud ies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 
Studies 



Home Ec. 
Home Ec. 
Home Ec. 
Home Ec. 

Ind. Arts 

Ind. Arts 

Ind. Arts 

Ind. Arts 

Ind. Arts 

Librarian 

Guidance Coun. 
Guidance Coun. 
Guidance Coun. 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


10,152.97 


1,716.12 


11,869.09 


11,538.09 




11,538.09 


11 ,139.07 




11,139.07 


7,654.72 


1,356.12 


9,010.84 


11,990.68 


1 ,896.12 


13,886.80 


12,515.09 


2,273.20 


14,788.29 


14,0^4^.^5 


2,453.20 


16,497.65 


11,629.88 


1 ,896.12 


13,526.00 


13,290.24 




13,290.24 


14,046t15 


2,868.44 


16,914.69 


13,489.55 


2,453.20 


15,942.75 


8,681.19 


1,536.12 


10,217.31 


14,453.52 




14,453.52 


16,728.75 




16,728.75 


12,287.40 


2,169.50 


14,453.52 


13,201.20 


2,256.12 


15,457.32 


7,996.03 


1,446.12 


9,442.15 


9,596.89 


1,716.12 


11,286.01 


17,963.35 




17,963.35 


10,296.97 


1,716,12 


12,013.09 


14,785.76 


-505.44 


14,280.32 


14,321.15 


2,543.04 


16,864.19 


1,623.68 


13.00 


1,636.68 


12,061.49 




12,061.49 


1,916.64 


13.00 


2,046.64 


10,682.32 


1,896.12 


12,578.44 


4,783.36 


43.50 


4,826.86 


10,655.37 


1,806.12 


12,461.49 


13,874.23 


2,539.73 


16,413.96 


8,643.88 


1,446.12 


10,090.00 


15,101.69 




15,101.69 


10,682.32 


1,896.12 


12,578.44 


9,736.00 


21.00 


9,757.00 


11,304.12 


1,986.12 


13,290.24 


7,679.72 


1,356.12 


9,035.84 


3,057.20 


390.00 


3,447.20 


9,704.51 


1,626.'12 


11,330.63 


3,057.20 




3,057.20 


6,446.97 


1,867.68 


8,314.65 


13,507.56 


2,227.68 


15,735.24 


9,922.56 




9,922.56 


3,512.52 




3,512.52 


10,466.68 


1,806.12 


12,272.80 


12,242.14 




12,242.14 


13,706.20 


2,453.20 


16,169.40 


14,270.70 


2,543.04 


16,813.74 



114 



POSITION REGULAR PAY OTHER GROSS PAY 

Byam School 

Principal 23,482.09 23,482.09 

Teacher 9,352.45 1,626.12 10,978.57 

Teacher 10,244.37 1,806.12 12,061.49 

Teacher 9,251.48 1,626.12 10,977.60 

Teacher 9,291.51 9,291-51 

Teacher 10,790.68 1,829.14 12,619-82 

Teacher 14, 182.16 14, 182. 16 

Teacher 10,883.00 1,896.12 12,779.12 

Teacher 9,248.95 1,626.12 10,875-07 

Teacher 2,866.72 -50.63 2, 816.09 

Teacher 15,942.75 15,942.75 

Teacher 9,736.00 9,736.00 

Teacher 10,255-37 1, 806.12 12, 061.49 

Teacher 9,491.21 1,672.24 11,163-49 

Teacher 10,255-37 1,806.12 12,061.49 

Teacher 12,061.49 12,061.49 

Teacher 11, 818.24 2,076.12 13,894.36 

Teacher 10,255-37 1,806.12 12,061.49 

Teacher 10,940.70 1,942.28 12,882.98 

Teacher 11, 818.24 2,076.12 13,894.36 

Teacher 8,289.88 1,446.12 9,736.00 

Teacher 5,920.07 1,182.59 7,102.66 

Teacher 8,289.88 1,446.12 9,736.00 

Teacher 14, 182.86 14,182.86 

Teacher 7,065.26 2,032.28 9,097-54 

Teacher 12,754.90 2,319-36 15,074.26 

Teacher 6,781.86 6,781.86 

Teacher 9,800.99 1,716.12 11,517.11 

McFarl in School 

Principal 23,482.09 23,482.09 

Teacher 10,127.80 2,333-75 12,460.95 

Teacher 8,289.88 1,446.12 9,735-00 

Teacher 10,313-31 10,313-31 

Teacher 13,351-24 2,346.12 15,781.36 

Teacher 12,061.49 12,061.49 

Teacher 13,489.55 2,453-20 15,942.75 

Teacher 11,238.69 1,986.12 13,360.02 

Teacher 10,127.80 2,273-20 12,401.00 

Teacher 9,736.00 9,736.00 

Teacher 9,696.97 1,716.12 11,414.14 

Teacher 12,561. 81 12,561.81 

Teacher 10,255-37 1, 806.12 12,061.49 

Teacher 11,647.39 11,647.39 

Teacher 12,801.20 2,256.12 15,057-32 

Teacher 14,305-37 2,543-04 16,848.41 

Teacher 9,696.97 1,716.12 11,413.09 

Teacher 10,632.96 1,896.12 12,529.09 

Teacher 8,289.88 1,446.12 9,736.00 

Teacher 10,898.32 2,022.12 12,920.44 

Teacher 10,875-07 10,875-07 

Teacher 10,255-37 1, 806.12 12,061.49 

115 



POSITION 

McFarl in School (cont'd) 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


10,790.68 


1,980.12 


12,770.80 


12,686.80 


.46 


12,687.26 


10,276.52 


1,863.67 


12,140.19 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


12,287.40 


2,166.12 


14,453.52 


14,571.48 


2,346.12 


16,917.60 


9,093.86 


1,536.12 


10,629.98 


11,413.09 




11 ,413.09 


5,042.52 


1,446.12 


6,488.64 


12,061.49 




12,061.49 



Center School 
Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Harrington School 
Pr inci pal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



23,482.09 

8,289.88 

14,453.52 

10,276.52 

4,892.22 

12,726.13 

5,068.99 

3,628.00 

8,289.88 

12,329.97 
7,743.04 

13,489.55 
12,512.56 
13,849.72 
14,785.76 
14,785.76 
11,238.69 
15,057.80 
6,757.46 
15,942.75 
12,686.80 
13,489.55 
9,739.69 
7,743.04 
12,329.97 
12,726.13 



23,482.09 

7,411.77 

10,875.07 

13,922.85 

14,785.76 

13,720.35 

9,708.67 

7,580.32 

12,963.76 

8,563.47 

6,420.24 

8,960.84 



1,446.12 

1 ,806.12 

480.53 

2,273.20 



1,446.12 
2,166.12 
2,273.20 
2,453.20 
2,273.20 



1 ,986.12 
858.04 

2,453.20 

2,273.20 
2,166.12 
2,273.20 



1,722.15 

2,453.20 

2,510.90 
1,716.12 
1,367.56 
11.54 
1 ,536.12 
1,896.12 



23,482.09 

9,736.00 
14,453.52 
12,082.64 

5,372.75 
14,999.33 

5,068.99 

3,628.00 

9,736.00 
14,496.09 
10,016.24 
15,942.75 
14,785.76 
13,849.72 
14,785.76 
14,785.76 
13,224.81 
15,057.80 

7,615.50 
15.942.75 
12,686.80 
15,942.75 

9,739.69 
10,016.24 
14,496.09 
14,999-33 



23,482.09 

9,133.92 

10,875.07 

16,376.05 

14,785.76 

16,231.25 

11 ,424.79 

8,947.88 

12,975-30 

10,099.59 

8,316.36 

8,960.84 



116 



POSITION 
Harrington School (cont'd) 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

North School 



Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

South Row School 

Pr inci pal 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


12,329.97 


2,166.12 


14,496.09 


11,238.69 


1,986.12 


13,224.81 


10,649.71 




10,649.71 


9,011 .89 


1 ,626.12 


10,638.01 


10,488.61 




10,488.61 


10,913.12 


1,954.74 


12,867.86 


10,875.07 




10,875.07 


14,153.65 


2,550.14 


16,703.79 


505.11 


1,051.70 


1,556.81 


8,231.76 


78.00 


8,309.76 




390.72 


390.72 


3,057.20 


5,118.40 


8,175.60 


14,216.42 


34.65 


14,251.07 


2,866.72 


1 ,513.60 


4,380.32 


10,000.07 


1,655.50 


11,655.57 


8,074.08 




8,074.08 


5,620.95 


1 ,626.12 


7,247.07 


9,569.89 


1,745.01 


11 ,314.90 


8,545.28 


1 ,446.12 


9,991.40 


3,247.36 




3,247.36 


9,536.15 


1,626.12 


11 ,162.27 


23,482.09 




23,482.09 


12,082.64 


-70.80 


12,011 .84 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


10,116.64 




10,116.64 


12,726.13 


1,711.10 


14,437.27 


3,509.73 




3,509.73 


10,255.37 


1 ,806.12 


12,061 .49 


12,686.80 




12,686.80 


11,304.12 


1 ,986.12 


13,290.24 


14,785-76 




14,785-76 


13,894.36 




13,894.36 


12,082.64 




12,082.64 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


11,304.12 


1,986.12 


13,290.24 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


10,276.52 


1 ,806.12 


12,082.64 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,765.76 


10,255.37 


1,774.22 


12,029.59 


12,387.59 


2,196.92 


14,584.51 


11,773.60 


2,035.68 


13,809.28 


12,329.97 


2,166.12 


14,496.09 


23,482.09 




23,482.09 


12,329.97 


2,166.12 


14,496.09 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


3,244.19 




3,244.19 


10,255.37 


1 ,806.12 


12,061 .49 


16,200.60 




■16,200.60 


13,489.55 


2,^5.20 


15,984.75 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


11 ,238.69 


1,986.12 


13,224.84 


11 ,818.24 


2,076.12 


13,894.36 



POSITION 

South Row School (cont'd) 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Westlands School 



Principal 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 

Elementary 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


14,785-76 




14,785.76 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


5,517.92 




5,517.92 


5,816.51 


879.04 


6,695.55 


1^,785.76 


4.50 


14,790.26 


11,304.12 


2,085.12 


13,389.24 


9,736.00 


45.70 


9,781.70 


11,304.12 


1,986.12 


13,290.24 


11,773.60 


2,076.12 


13,849.72 


18,161.00 




18,161.00 


13,489.55 


2,453.20 


15,942.75 


14,496.09 




14,496.09 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


4,848.42 


871.04 


5,719.46 



23,482.09 

10,790.68 
14,498.85 
15,511.89 
12,512.56 
11,818.24 
12,512.56 
12,686.80 
13,489.55 

2,384.56 
15,942.75 

9,708.67 
13,849.72 
14,785.76 

12,512.56 
12,512.56 
12,726.13 
12,329.97 
12,182.59 
12,329.97 
10,790.68 
10,265.84 
12,512.56 
10,255.37 

6,439.85 
11,794.75 

5,683.32 
13,593.38 
14,123.92 
11,773.60 
12,512.56 

8,289.88 



14,046.15 
4,676.16 



1,896.12 

835.32 
2,273.20 
2,076.12 
2,273.20 

2,453.20 



1,716.12 

276.12 
2,273.20 
2,273.20 
2,273.20 
2,166.12 
2,233.24 
2,166.12 
1,896.12 
1,896.12 
2,381.70 
1 ,806.12 

795.50 
2,076.12 
1,933.44 

2,273.20 
2,076.12 
2,273.20 
1 ,450.12 



2,543.04 
813.04 



23,482.09 



12 


686 


80 


14 


498.85 


16 


347 


21 


14 


785 


76 


13 


894 


36 


14 


785 


76 


12 


686 


80 


15 


942 


75 


2 


384 


56 


15 


942 


75 


11 


424 


79 


13 


849.72 


lit 


785 


76 




276 


12 


14 


785 


76 


14 


785 


76 


14 


999 


33 


I*. 


496 


09 


14 


415 


83 


14 


496 


09 


12 


686 


80 


12 


161 


96 


14 


894 


26 


12 


061 


49 


7 


,235 


35 


13 


870.07 


7 


,616 


76 


13 


593 


38 


16 


397 


12 


13 


849 


72 


14 


785 


76 


9 


740 


00 


16 


,589 


19 


5 


,489 


20 



118 



POSITION 

Elementary (cont'd) 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 
Guidance Counselor 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Art Teacher 

Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 
Music Teacher 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Phys Ed 

Read ing 
Reading 
Reading 
Reading 
Read ing 
Reading 
Reading 

Librarians 
Librarians 

IMC 

Program Supervisor 

IMC Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


1 A ,046. 1 5 


2,543.04 


16,589.19 


19,502.01 




19,502.01 


14,046.15 


2,543.04 


16,589.19 


6,536.95 




6,536.95 


12,477.56 


2,166.12 


14,643.68 


7,604.72 


1,356.12 


8,960.84 


12,512.56 


2,273.20 


14,785.76 


10,276.52 


1,806.12 


12,082.64 


11,413.09 




11,413.09 


12,329.97 


2,166.12 


14,496.09 


8,666.97 


1,536.12 


10,203.09 


14,785.76 




14,785.76 


5,620.95 


1,626.12 


7,247.07 


1,602.49 


130.00 


*l,?32,if9 


10,255.37 


1,806.12 


12,061.49 


8,289.88 


1,446.12 


9,736.00 


8,960.84 




8,960.84 


7,999-72 


45.70 


8,045.42 


9,696.97 


1,716.12 


11,413.09 


11,304.12 


1,923.19 


13,227.31 


8,443.12 


1,446.12 


9,889.24 


5,645.18 


2,753.50 


8,398.68 


13,008.07 


4.83 


13,012.90 


9,058.17 


1,536.12 


10,594.29 


14,793.12 




14,793.12 


15,889.55 


2,453.20 


18,342.75 


12,516.24 


2,273.20 


14,789.44 


10,999.76 


1,896.12 


12.8P5.88 


12,212.31 


2,076.12 


14,288.43 


17,134.20 


90.00 


17,224.20 


16,720.18 




16,720.18 


14,146.34 


2,573.84 


16,720.18 


13,586.95 


2,484.00 


16,070.95 


13,586.95 


2,484.00 


16,070.95 


13,586.95 


2,484.00 


16,070.95 


12,612.75 


2,304.00 


14,916.75 


14,146.34 


2,573.84 


16,720.18 


8,289.88 


1 ,446.12 


9,736.00 


9,708.67 


1 ,716.12 


11 ,424.79 


20,326.14 




20,326.14 


9,708.67 


1,716.12 


11 ,424.79 



Core Evaluation Team 

Cha i rpersons 
Chai rperson 
Cha i rperson 



15,871.74 
16,309.31 



15,871.74 
16,309.31 



119 



POSITION 



REGULAR PAY 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



Core Evaluation Team (Cont'd) 
Cha i rperson 

School Psychologist 

Summer Workshops 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Title I Teacher 

Teacher 

Title I Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Title I Aide 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



15,895.02 
12,172.02 



9,077.96 
8,555.8ft 



1,983.08 



255.40 
140.32 
136.65 
258.48 
620.09 
478.20 
366.70 
258.48 
366.70 
765.20 
272.36 
669.80 

1,169.57 
701.60 
334.60 
491.85 
433.30 

1,126.58 
330.03 

1 ,142.28 
239.50 

2,722.00 
242.48 

1,126.58 
510.40 
164.00 
334.90 
542.60 
779.94 
344.42 
255.40 
389.97 
334.90 
229.86 
255.40 
731.77 
255.20 
430.44 
126.35 
258.48 
114.25 
287.10 
920.77 
287.10 

1 ,600.50 
417.72 
733.40 
319.00 
398.50 



15,895.02 
14,155.10 



255.40 
140.32 
136.65 
258.48 
620.09 
478.20 
366.70 
258.48 
366.70 
765.20 
272.36 
669.80 

1,169.57 
701.60 
334.60 
491.85 
433.30 

1,126.58 
330.03 

1,142.28 
239.50 

2,722.00 
242.48 

1,126.58 
510.40 
164.00 
334.90 
542.60 
779.94 
344.42 
255.40 
389.97 
334.90 
229.86 
255.40 
731.77 
255.20 
430.44 

9,204.31 
258.48 

8,670.09 
287.10 
920.77 
287.10 

1 ,600.50 
417.72 
733.40 
319.00 
398.50 



120 



POSITION 

Summer Workshops (cont'd) 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Title I Teacher 

Teacher 

Title I Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Di rector Title I 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Aide 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




586.72 


586.72 




398.50 


398.50 




301.41 


301 .41 




866.60 


866.60 




319.00 


319.00 




239.50 


239.50 




301.41 


301.41 




586.72 


586.72 




535.84 


535.84 




102.16 


102.16 




153.24 


153.24 




3,840.10 


3,840.10 




430.45 


430.45 




330.03 


330.03 




382.60 


382.60 




669.80 


669.80 




153.24 


153.24 




90.93 


90.93 




334.60 


334.60 




481.66 


481.66 




366.70 


366.70 




287.00 


287.00 




318.86 


318.86 




319.00 


319.00 




334.90 


334.90 




121.24 


121.24 




484.96 


484.96 




1,408.96 


1,408.96 




43.30 


43.30 


8,555.84 


114.25 


8,670.09 




121.24 


121.24 


10,121.70 


178.78 


10,300.48 




255-20 


255.20 




449.59 


449.59 




829.46 


829.46 


15,381.95 




15,381.95 




484.96 


484.96 




439.76 


439.76 




828.80 


828.80 




334.90 


334.90 




433.30 


433.30 




792.42 


792.42 




561.28 


561.28 




272.79 


272.79 




612.16 


612.16 




401.50 


401 .50 




701.60 


701 .60 




108.00 


108.00 




255.40 


255.40 




260.52 


260.52 




210.34 


210.34 




215.55 


215.55 




255.16 


255.16 




287.10 


287.10 



121 



POSITION 

Special Education 
Director of Spec. Ed. 

Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 
Teacher 



Subst 


tute 


Teachers 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


t.ute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


23,482.09 




23,482.09 


10,426.60 




10,426.60 


13,642.55 


113.00 


13,755.55 


10,505.36 


1,943.27 


12,448.63 


12,579.96 


2,243.05 


14,823.00 


13,976.29 




13,976.29 


9,498.94 


2,816.96 


12,315.90 


13,739.54 


2,530.12 


16,269.66 


12,023.59 


2,153.04 


14,245.64 


8,271.93 


1,433.04 


9,704.97 


1,909.04 




1,909.04 


8,539.87 


1,523.04 


10,062.91 


12,537.39 


2,243.04 


14,780.43 


13,551.72 




13,551.72 


11,831.26 


2,145.46 


13,978.72 


9,708.67 


1,745.01 


11,453.68 


12,673.85 


2,256.12 


14,929.97 


9,352.45 


1,626.12 


10,978.57 


9,708.67 


1,716.12 


11,424.79 


6,118.49 


2,057.61 


8,176.10 


13,678.36 




13,678.36 


9,808.86 


1,746.92 


11,555.78 


14,584.51 




14,584.51 


14,146.34 


2,573.84 


16,720.18 


9,691.14 


1,746.92 


11,438.06 


3,437.52 




3,437.52 


16,073.74 




16,073.74 


4,198.72 




4,198.72 


16,073.74 




16,073.74 


4,388.88 




4,388.88 


14,146.34 


2,573.84 


16,720.18 


9,061.75 


1,536.12 


10,597.87 




1,118.00 


1,118.00 


110.62 


3,660.00 


3,770.62 




500.00 


500.00 




503.25 


503.25 




611.00 


611.00 




156.00 


156.00 




988.00 


988.00 




234.00 


234.00 




598.00 


598.00 




143.00 


143.00 




182.00 


182.00 




1,222.00 


1,222.00 




100.00 


100.00 




130.00 


130.00 




650.00 


650.00 




26.00 


26.00 




232.00 


232.00 




2,487.00 


2,487.00 



122 



POSITION 



Subst 


itute 


Teachers 


Subst 


itute 


Teacher 


Subst 


itute 


Teacher 


Subst 


itute 


Teacher 


Subst 


"tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


itute 


Teacher 


Subst 


itute 


Teacher 


Subst 


'tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


"tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


'tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst' 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst" 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 


Substi 


tute 


Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




878.75 


878.75 




300.00 


300.00 




182.00 


182.00 




1,094.00 


1,094.00 




1,259-00 


1 ,259.00 




104.00 


104.00 




182.00 


182.00 




39.00 


39-00 




468.00 


468.00 




26.00 


26.00 




1,898.00 


1,898.00 




442.00 


442.00 




286.00 


286.00 


26.00 


-26.00 






338.00 


338.00 




234.00 


234.00 




302.00 


302.00 




910.00 


910.00 




390.00 


390.00 


' 


52.00 


52.00 




300.00 


300.00 




1,891.00 


1 ,891.00 




182.00 


182.00 




130.00 


130.00 




1,183.00 


1 ,183.00 




26.00 


26.00 




26.00 


26.00 




26.00 


26.00 




272.00 


272.00 




1,417.00 


1,417.00 




2,733.00 


2,733.00 




572.00 


572.00 




200.00 


200.00 




234.00 


234.00 




1,118.00 


1,118.00 




286.00 


286.00 




210.00 


210.00 




156.00 


156.00 




26.00 


26.00 




26.00 


26.00 




150.00 


150.00 




468.00 


468.00 




208.00 


208.00 




702.00 


702.00 




52.00 


52.00 




1,872.00 


1 ,872.00 




26.00 


26.00 




78.00 


78.00 




143.00 


143.00 




949.00 


949.00 




754.00 


754.00 




104.00 


104.00 




78.00 


78.00 




104.00 


104.00 



123 



POSITION 



Subst 


tute 


Teachers 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


"tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


"tute 


Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




125.00 


125.00 




956.00 


956.00 




325.00 


325.00 




169.00 


169.00 




156.00 


156.00 




26.00 


26.00 




52.00 


52.00 




182.00 


182.00 




767.00 


767.00 




1 ,457-00 


1,457.00 




104.00 


104.00 




488.00 


488.00 




2,180.00 


2,180.00 




897.00 


897.00 




143.00 


143.00 




676.00 


676.00 




130.00 


130.00 




78.00 


78.00 




104.00 


104.00 




90.00 


90.00 




1,178.00 


1,178.00 




3,126.00 


3,126.00 




52.00 


52.00 




24.00 


24.00 




754.00 


754.00 




208.00 


208.00 




666.00 


666.00 




858.00 


858.00 




26.00 


26.00 




78.00 


78.00 




465.00 


465.00 




26.00 


26.00 




1,872.00 


1 ,872.00 




286.00 


286.00 




117.00 


117.00 




60.00 


60.00 




1,573.00 


1,573.00 




104.00 


104.00 




52.00 


52.00 




819.00 


819.00 




104.00 


104.00 




816.00 


816.00 




1,974.00 


1 ,974.00 




1 ,265.00 


1 ,265.00 




1,008.00 


1 ,008.00 




518.00 


518.00 




884.00 


884.00 




869.00 


869.00 




680.00 


680.00 




26.00 


26.00 




663.00 


663.00 




130.00 


130.00 




410.00 


410.00 




481 .00 


481 .00 



124 







POSITION 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher (c 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 


Subst 


tute 


Teacher 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




182.00 


182.00 




78.00 


78.00 




503.50 


503.50 




2,436.00 


2,436.00 


300.00 


156.00 


456.00 




325.00 


325.00 




2,444.00 


2,444.00 




1 ,447.00 


1 ,447.00 




1 ,306.00 


1 ,306.00 




3T2.00 


312.00 




528.00 


528.00 




416.00 


416.00 




52.00 


52.00 




1,833.00 


1 ,833.00 




164.00 


164.00 




52.00 


52.00 




390.00 


390.00 




481 .00 


481 .00 




364.00 


364.00 




104.00 


104.00 




26.00 


26.00 




26.00 


26.00 




312.00 


312.00 




1,066.00 


1 ,066.00 




1,462.40 


1 ,462.40 




26.00 


26.00 




13.00 


13.00 




260.00 


260.00 




52.00 


52.00 




841.92 


841.92 


1 ,000.00 


1,238.00 


2,238.00 




156.00 


156.00 




150.00 


150.00 




156.00 


156.00 




234.00 


234.00 




481.00 


481.00 




962.00 


962.00 




52.00 


52.00 




302.00 


302.00 




500.00 


500.00 




351.00 


351.00 




104.00 


104.00 




2,132.00 


2,132.00 




1 ,820.00 


1 ,820.00 




2,757.00 


2,757.00 




52.00 


52.00 




507.00 


507.00 




429.00 


429.00 




1 ,888.00 


1 ,888.00 




910.00 


910.00 




3,178.96 


3,178.96 




455.00 


455.00 




26.00 


26.00 



125 



POSITION 



Tutors 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Tutor 

Secretaries 
Administration 
Administrat ion 
Coordinators' 
Personnel 
Payrol 1 

Administration 
Superintendent ' s 
Payroll 
Payrol 1 

Administrat ion 
Administrat ion 
Bookkeeping 
Payrol 1 
Coordinators ' 
Career Ed 
Coord inators ' 
Cal 1 s Subst i tutes 
Media Center 
Special Education 



REGULAR PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




2,140.65 


2,140.65 




1,325.59 


1,325.59 




337.00 


337.00 




838.75 


838.75 




153.00 


153.00 




111.48 


111.48 




66.00 


66.00 




472.49 


472.49 




370.00 


370.00 




18.00 


18.00 




48.00 


48.00 




63.00 


63.00 




133.25 


133.25 


7,889.70 




7,889.70 




4,360.15 


4,360.15 


7,130.90 


-84.77 


7.046.13 


8,052.12 


327.07 


8,379.19 


8,720.40 




8,720.40 


7,712.64 


6.19 


7,718.83 


8,316.39 


211.37 


8,527.76 


2,175.60 


440.30 


2,615.90 


2,590.00 


349.65 


2,939.65 


8,836.20 


37.71 


8,873.91 


7,130.56 


276.00 


7,406.56 


8,648.91 




8,648.91 


3,347.25 




3,347.25 


8,486.40 




8,486.40 


5,253.30 




5,253.30 


6,885.06 


-231 .05 


6,654.01 


3,989.41 


-155.36 


3,834.05 


6,895.20 




6,895.20 


7,889.70 




7,889.70 



Secretaries 



High School 

Principal ' s 

Receptionist 

House 

House 

House 

House 

Gu idance 

Parker Jr. High 

Secretary 

Secretary 

McCarthy Jr. High 
Secretary 
Secretary 
Secretary 



7,765.55 




7,765.55 


5,938.66 


289.80 


6,228.46 


6,270.03 


26.55 


6,296.58 


6,278.48 


195.96 


6,474.44 


5,998.07 


93.26 


6,091.33 


6,009.90 


273.00 


6,282.90 


7,114.90 




7,114.90 


7,765.55 




7,765.55 


6,455.80 




6,455.80 


5,687.50 


-192.22 


5,495.28 


6,455.80 




6,455.80 


7,765.55 




7,765.55 



126 



POSITION 



REGULAR PAY 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



Byam School 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Center School 
Secretary 

Harrington School 

Secretary 

Secretary 

McFarl in School 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

Secretary 

North School 
Secretary 

South Row School 
Secretary 

Westlands School 
Administrative Assistant 
Secretary 

Sub Secretaries 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 
Sub Secretary 



6,458.82 
5,709.34 



6,477.18 



68.25 
336.70 



163.80 



6,527.07 
6,046.0*4 



6,640.: 



6,465.03 


-163.80 


6,301.23 


5,696.86 


-360.75 


5,336.11 


1,023.75 


-136.50 


887.25 


6,112.45 


447.25 


6,559-70 


3,808.87 


-192.40 


3,616.47 


3,756.48 


-412.76 


3,343.72 


6,480.69 


341.25 


6,821.94 


5,924.16 


627.90 


6,552.06 


7,965.47 


664.07 


8,629.54 


5,681.26 


-96.20 


5,585.06 




430.70 


430.70 




431.65 


431.65 




1,284.95 


1,284.95 




200.20 


200.20 




108.10 


108.10 




62.00 


62.00 




95.32 


95.32 




316.05 


316.05 




80.60 


80.60 




265.05 


265.05 




111.60 


111.60 




122.45 


122.45 




142.60 


142.60 




635.50 


635-50 




119.48 


119.48 




210.00 


210.00 




702.15 


702.15 




2,909.35 


2,909.35 



127 





POSITION 


Custod 


ans 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod' 


an 


Custod" 


an 


Custod" 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod" 


an 


Custod' 


an 


Custod' 


an 


Custod' 


an 


Custod' 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


an 


Custod 


'an 


Custod 


"an 


Custod 


: an 


Custod 


Ian 



EGULAR PAY C 


1VERTIME PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


380.80 




190.40 


571.20 


10,244.00 




-8.40 


10.235.60 


9,908.80 


696.16 


51.36 


10,648.32 


9,578.40 


136.76 


-7.44 


9 


707.72 






2,048.02 


2 


048.02 


9,578.40 


105.44 


-7.44 


9 


676.40 


9,332.80 


286.49 


-.80 


9 


618.49 


9,578.40 


130.00 


-7.44 


9 


709.96 


8,152.00 


6.45 


-197.60 


7 


960.85 


9,578.40 


220.00 


-7.44 
1,891.75 


9 
1 


790.96 
891.75 


11,576.81 






11 


576.81 


9,578.40 


576.46 


-7.44 


10 


147.42 


9,578.40 


865.33 


-7.44 


10 


436.29 


10,450.70 


213.62 


5.87 


10 


670.19 


6,988.80 


71.50 


-5.28 


7 


055.02 


1,104.00 


66.24 


5,201.12 


6 


371.36 


9,256.00 


1,280.43 


-7.20 


10 


529.23 


6,312.00 


348.30 


-44.00 


6 


616.30 


9,256.00 


1,291.65 


-7.20 


10 


540.45 


9,578.40 


1,333.03 


-7.44 


10 


903.99 


7,416.00 


540.55 


-338.40 


7 


618.15 


9,256.00 


62.10 


-7.20 


9 


310.90 


1,104.00 


143.64 


6,789.71 


8 


037.75 


9,256.00 


109.65 


-80.80 


9 


284.85 


9,256.00 


780.33 


-7.20 


10 


029.13 


9,256.00 


62.60 


-7.20 


9 


311.40 


9,578.40 


374.24 


-7.44 


9 


945.20 


1,104.00 


97.32 


147.20 


1 


348.52 


9,578.40 


55.40 


-7.44 


9 


626.36 


9,256.00 


842.26 


-7.20 


10 


098.06 


9,256.00 


295.24 


-41.60 


9 


509.64 


9,256.00 


748.92 


-7.20 


9 


997.72 


9,256.00 


1,454.65 


-7.20 


10 


703.45 


9,578.40 


574.11 


-7.44 


10 


145.07 


9,256.00 


12.90 


-7.20 


9 


261.70 


9,256.00 


361.20 


-7.20 


9 


610.00 


9,256.00 


276.76 


-7.20 


9 


525.56 


9,256.00 


527.88 


-7.20 


9 


776.68 


9,256.00 


697.79 


-7.20 


9 


946.59 


9,256.00 


348.30 


-7.20 


9 


597.10 


9,256.00 


927.33 


-7.20 


10 


176.13 


9,256.00 


902.65 


-7.20 


10 


151.45 


7,416.00 


210.27 


-228.00 


7 


398.'27 


9,256.00 




-7.20 


9 


248.80 


9,256.00 


56.15 


-7.20 


9 


304.95 


9,578.40 


84.56 


-7.44 


9 


655.52 


9,578.40 


67.78 


-7.44 


9 


638.74 


9,256.00 


653.58 


-7.20 


9 


902.38 


263.20 




789.60 


1 


052.80 


9,256.00 


159.10 


-7.20 


9 


407-90 


9,256.00 




-7.20 


9 


248.80 


9,578.40 


1,025.25 


-7.44 


10 


596.21 


9,256.00 


250.65 


-7.20 


9 


499.45 



128 



POSITION 



REGULAR PAY OVERTIME PAY 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



Custod ian (cont'd) 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custod ian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Custod ian 

Custodian 

Custodian 

Substitute Custodians 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Substitute Custodian 

Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 
Aide 

Director Food Services 
Director Food Services 

A/V 
A/V 

School Physician 
School Physician 

Nurses 

LPN 

LPN 

LPN 

LPN 

RN Head Nurse 

LPN 

LPN 



9,256.00 
9,578.40 
9,256.00 
9,256.00 
9,256.00 
9,578.40 
9,256.00 
331.20 
9,256.00 
9,256.00 



11,93^.56 



8,155.71 
12,743.35 

1,500.00 
2,250.00 



4,271.32 
3,380.28 
5,066.68 
5,066.68 
7,306.81 
4,271.32 
4,271.32 

129 



606.20 

180.05 

54.00 

1,093.91 

1,359-87 

248.40 

392.16 

198.72 

1,445.38 

1,256.12 



-7.20 
-7.44 
-7.20 
-7.20 
-7.20 
-7.55 

-76.00 

1,154.88 

-7.20 

-41.60 



164.00 

154.80 

1,842.40 

66.24 

167.10 

1,731.60 

2,738.43 

1,839.11 

447.44 

27.80 

309.60 

900.00 

125.40 

626.45 

46.20 

4.40 

1,221.00 

1*100.00 

1,151.85 

997.50 

1,126.55 

35.20 

48.40 

-405.00 
1,213.20 



795.36 
-76.08 

-244.80 

1,384.98 

795.36 

795.36 

\ 



9,855.00 

9,751.01 

9,302.80 

10,342.71 

10,608.67 

9,819.36 

9,572.16 

1,684.80 

10,694.18 

10,470.52 



164.00 

154.80 

1,842.40 

66.24 

167.10 

1,731.60 

2,738.43 

1,839.11 

447.44 

27.80 

309.60 

900.00 

125.40 

626.45 

46.20 

40 

00 



4 

1 ,221 

1,100.00 

1,151.85 

997.50 

1,126.55 

35.20 

48.40 

11,529.56 
1,213.20 

8,155.71 
12,743.35 

1 ,500.00 
2,250.00 



5,066.68 
3,304.20 
5,066.68 
4,841.88 
7,306.81 
5,066.68 
5,066.68 





POSITION 


Nurses (cont'.d) 


RN 




RN 




RN 




Subst i tute 


Nurses 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 


Substitute 


Nurse 



Teacher 


A 


des and Substitute Aides 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and Substitute Aide 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


"eacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


'de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


'de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


"de 


and 


Substitute 


A 


de 



"GULAR PAY ( 


WERT 1 ME PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


8,109.82 






19.26 


8,129.08 


8,109.82 






19.26 


8,129.08 


1,860.36 






1,271.43 

1,587.60 

2,160.11 

2,250.00 

226.80 

315.00 

241.20 

327.60 

100.80 

781.20 

1,651.95 

1,500.00 

25.20 

47.99 
281.59 


3,131.79 

1,587.60 

2,160.11 

2,250.00 

226.80 

315.00 

241.20 

327.60 

100.80 

781.20 

1,651.95 

1,500.00 

25.20 

47.99 
281.59 


1,200.50 






609.08 


1,809.58 


1,018.00 






1,462.14 


2,480.14 


1,249.50 






445.36 


1,694.87 


2,205.00 






666.98 
172.80 


2,871.98 
172.80 


1,274.00 






-198.45 


1,075.55 


1,146.60 






541.32 


1,687.92 


1,528.80 






327.24 


1,856.04 


1,911.00 






956.84 

593.62 

20.66 


2,867.84 

593.62 

20.66 


1,577.80 






626.12 


2,203.92 


686.00 






904.70 
1,212.75 


1,626.70 
1,212.75 
1,262.49 








1,262.49 


2,177.50 


156 


40 


1,748.58 


4,082.50 


633.60 






-85.80 

13.97 

180.40 


547.80 

13.97 

180.40 


1,911.00 






951.94 


2,862.94 


1,592.50 






681.63 


2,274.13 


1,274.00 






612.80 


1,886.80 


509.50 


127 


38 


479.72 


1,116.70 


1,528.80 






643.39 
1,192.50 


2,172.14 
1,192.50 


764.40 


80 


60 


352.17 
77.96 


1,197.17 
77.96 


2,732.00 






545.20 


3,277.20 


3,189.75 


12 


75 


-540.76 
240.52 


2,661.74 
240.52 


1,274.00 


56 


35 


609.85 


1,940.20 


2,286.48 


3 


65 


824.67 
25.03 


3,114.80 
25.03 



130 



POSITION 



Teacher 


A 


des an 


i Substitute Aides 


Teacher 


A 


fde 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


A 


'de 


Teacher 


A 


'de 


and 


Subst 


"tute 


A 


"de 


Teacher 


A 


'de 


and 


Subst 


"tute 


A 


'de 


Teacher 


A 


'de 


and 


Subst 


"tute 


A 


'de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


'de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A' 


de 


and 


Subst' 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 



REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


(cont'd) 












211.09 


211.09 


1,783.60 




698.71 


2,482.31 






1,521.63 


1,521.63 






4,476.30 


4,476.30 


1,592.50 




696.80 


2,289.18 






282.41 


282.14 


3,283.00 


278.25 


1,463.10 


5,024.35 


T ,401.40 




637.27 


2,038.67 


1,528.80 




733.53 


2,262.33 


1,685.60 




645.71 


2,331.31 






126.50 


126.50 


1,011.00 




888.71 


2,799-71 


1,528.80 




749.52 


2,278.32 






238.35 


238.35 


1,210.30 




605.16 


1,815.46 






1,036.12 


1,036.12 


1,274.00 




584.57 


1,858.57 


1,549.01 


22.05 


530.48 


2,101.54 


1,342.00 


53.90 


563.40 


1,959.30 


1,401.40 


6.12 


594.56 


2,002.08 


1,528.80 




681.46 


2,210.26 


2,123.16 




972.55 


3,095.71 


1,446.55 


6.12 


581.75 


2,034.42 






363.29 


363.29 


1,646.40 




735.32 


2,381.72 


1,592.50 


3.68 


777.77 


2,373.95 


1,587.16 


19.60 


448.07 


2,054.83 


657,60 




614.35 


1,271.95 






1,027.23 


1,027.23 






14.58 


14.58 






971.60 


971.60 


2,253.58 


49.66 


287.30 


2,590.54 






46.17 


46.17 


1,911.00 




811.08 


2,722.08 


1,592.50 




733.65 


2,325.15 






24.20 


24.20 






106.93 


106.93 


2,058.00 


3.67 


882.68 


2,944.35 






49.50 


49.50 






1,462.50 


1,462.50 


933.00 


16.27 


171.12 


1,120.39 






103.37 


103.37 






829.29 


829.29 


1,401.40 


1.22 


620.20 


2,022.82 


1,528.80 


2.45 


694.05 


2,225.30 


1,646.40 


18.98 


661.00 


2,326.38 


178.36 




-105.60 


72.76 


2,613.00 




1,433.44 


4,046.44 


1,783.60 


23.27 


888.60 


2,695.47 


1,576.51 


18.36 


746.39 


2,341.26 






38.07 


38.07 






74.80 


74.80 






38.88 


38.88 



131 



POSITION 



Teacher 


A 


des and Substitute Aides 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


"de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


"de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 



(cont'd) 



1,531.20 
1,700.50 
1,633-20 
1,27^.00 
588.00 
2,511.00 
1,576.38 

509.60 
1,672.06 
1,592.50 
1,911.00 
1,274.00 

1,528.80 

974.50 

2,764.45 

1,274.00 

1,911.00 

264.00 
1,528.80 
1,372.00 
1,672.06 

1,719.90 

2,123.16 

754.60 

509.60 

1,852.20 

686.00 

392.00 

1,528.80 

1,274.00 



1,911.00 
509.60 
2,123.16 
1,391.60 
1,960.00 



TIME PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




74.80 


74.80 




38.88 


38.88 




24.30 


24.30 




38.87 


38.87 




1,001.93 


2,533.13 




185.35 


1,885.85 




-411.11 


1,222.09 


7.35 


681.32 


1,962.67 


354.01 


712.06 


1,654.07 




1,148.50 


3,659.50 


1.22 


731.35 


2,308.95 




52.80 


52.80 


14.94 


225.76 


750.30 


25.72 


850.73 


2,548.51 




770.50 


2,363.00 




689.70 


2,600.70 


8.57 


619.21 


1,901.78 




380.07 


380.07 




742.71 


2,271.51 


116.45 


904.24 


1,995.19 


66.30 


1,231.67 


4,062.42 




45.53 


45-53 


33.07 


410.67 


1,717.74 




40.70 


40.70 




956.84 


2,867.84 




483.19 


483.19 




953.60 


1,217.60 




749.52 


2,278.32 




564.19 


1,936.19 




791.56 


2,463.62 




18.52 


18.52 


34.28 


872.40 


2,262.58 




330.33 


330.33 




957.44 


3,080.60 




1,438.20 


1,438.20 


64.92 


387.53 


1,207.05 


232.75 


646.28 


1,388.63 




695.30 


2,547.50 




16.18 


16.18 


2.45 


-82.30 


606.15 




82.15 


82.15 




-131.08 


260.92 




877.62 


877.62 




810.26 


2,339.06 




44.96 


44.96 




580.90 


1,854.90 




79.80 


79.80 




12.10 


12.10 




1,658.61 


1,658.61 




942.14 


2,853.14 


3.92 


213.24 


726.76 


3.67 


932.05 


3,058.88 




666.10 


2,057.70 


38.58 


660.18 


2,658.76 




14.58 


14.58 



132 



POSITION 



Teacher 


A 


des and Substitute Aides 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Teacher 


A 


de 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 



Library 


and 


Substi 


tute 


Ai 


des 


Library 


and 


Substi 


tute 


Ai 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


tute 


A 


de 


LI brary 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


A 


'de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


"tute 


A 


'de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


A 


"de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


•de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


"de 


Library 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 


LI brary 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 


Library 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 


LI brary 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 


Library 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 


LI brary 


and 


Subst 


itute 


A 


ide 



Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 
Adult Education 



REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME PAY 


OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


(cont'd) 








1,274.00 




588.50 


1,862.50 






467.86 


467.86 


1,274.00 




634.00 


1 ,908.00 


2,123.16 




973.77 


3,096.93 






12.10 


12.10 


1,411.20 




660.52 


2,071.72 






14.58 


14.58 


1,274.00 


24.50 


765.89 


2,064.39 


1,068.20 


4.90 


-169.77 


903.33 


1,852.20 


1.83 


738.16 


2,592.19 


1,512.81 


29.40 


784.04 


2,326.25 


807.55 


70.40 


547.68 


1,452.63 


509.60 


1.22 


-87.22 


423.60 


1,528.80 




666.76 


2,195.56 


1,640.21 




750.80 


2,391.01 






985.88 


985.88 






27.50 


27.50 






36.58 


36.58 


1,984.50 




841.87 


2,826.37 


1,082.90 




636.45 


1,719.35 


1,592.50 




740.05 


2,332.55 






13.20 


13.20 






1,005.40 


1,005.40 


2,058.00 


13.47 


842.00 


2,913.47 






74.25 


74.25 


1,114.68 


204.53 


615.77 


1,934.98 


2,070.25 


18.37 


907.51 


2,996.13 


2,058.00 


3.67 


926.93 


2,988.60 


2,229.50 




855.74 


3,085.24 






116.60 


116.60 


1,592.50 


4.90 


606.28 


2,203.68 


1,911.00 




903.60 


2, 814.60 


1,911.00 




839.40 


2,750.40 


1,911.00 


6.12 


947.48 


2,864.60 


1,051.05 


3.67 


560.98 


1 ,615.70 






33.00 


33.00 






6.60 


6.60 


1,656-20 




806.88 


2,463.08 






24.20 


24.20 


73.50 




-7.35 


66.15 






3-30 


3.30 


1,114.68 


280.50 


705.16 


2,100.34 


1,051.05 


34.29 


567.97 


1,653.31 






203.95 


203.95 






390.43 


390.43 






790.00 


790.00 






2,646.55 


2,646.55 






200.00 


200.00 






712.00 


712.00 



POSITION 



Adult Education (cont'd) 



REGULAR PAY OVERTIME PAY 



Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 
Adult 



Education 
Educat ion 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 
Education 



School Committee Secy. 
School Committee Secy. 



IMC 














Aide 










6,552 


00 


Aide 














Cataloguer 








8,773 


94 


Chapter 766 Aide 












Chapter 766 Aide 












Cafeteria 


Workers and Substitutes 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


6,212 


44 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


3,928.96 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


180 


00 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


V/o r ke r 


and 


Subst 


tute 






Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 







295.78 



OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


355.00 


355.00 


96.00 


96.00 


334.00 


33^.00 


730.00 


730.00 


358.00 


358.00 


379.00 


379.00 


406.00 


406.00 


544.00 


544.00 


733.00 


733.00 


358.00 


358.00 


308.00 


308.00 


382.00 


382.00 


709.00 


709.00 


712.00 


712.00 


688.00 


688.00 


100.00 


100.00 


452.55 


452.55 


1,799.70 


1,799-70 


-266.35 


6,581.43 


52.80 


52.80 



8,773.94 



1,483.97 


1,483.97 


1,910.99 


1,910.99 


481.75 


481.75 


90.73 


90.73 


-404.82 


5,807.62 


3,192.34 


3,192.34 


98.70 


98.70 


2,727.51 


2,727.51 


2,998.60 


2,998.60 


135.14 


135.14 


9.40 


9.40 


879.55 


4,808.53 


3,050.63 


3,050.63 


2,772.54 


2,772.54 


3,183.72 


3,363.72 


3,143.34 


1,143.34 


3,141.94 


3,141.94 


2,652.88 


2,652.88 


2,652.88 


2,652.88 


1,918.98 


1,918.98 


2,597.34 


2,597.34 


7.65 


7.65 


2,622.68 


2,622.68 


14.10 


14.10 


9.40 


9.40 


3,137.76 


3,137.76 



134 





POSITION 




REGULAR PA 


Cafeteria 


Workers an 


i Substitutes 


(cont'd) 


Cafeteria 


Workers an 


J Substitute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


itute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


"tute 




Cafeteria 


Wo r ke r 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


"tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


"tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


"tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


4,875.44 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Wo r ke r 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Wo r ke r 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


5,368.80 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


5,368.80 


Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst" 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst" 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst" 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 




Cafeteria 


Worker 


and 


Subst' 


tute 





OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


610.80 


610.80 


2,844.06 


2,844.06 


1,903.36 


1,903.36 


282.00 


282.00 


2,597.3*1 


2,597.34 


2,652.16 


2,652.16 


18.80 


18.80 


1,938.95 


1,938.95 


22.33 


22.33 


1,701.36 


1,701.36 


3,141.94 


3,141.94 


24.68 


24.68 


2,104.32 


2,104.32 


3,175.35 


3,175.35 


2,873.14 


2,873.14 


830.73 


830.73 


3,116.20 


3,116.20 


3,203.31 


3,203.31 


1,738.05 


1,738.05 


2,800.34 


2,800.34 


1,558.46 


6,433.90 


85.78 


85.78 


455.90 


455.90 


2,453.34 


2,453.34 


126.90 


126.90 


71.68 


71.68 


3,324.48 


3,324.48 


31.73 


31.73 


2,545.50 


2,545.50 


2,594.36 


2,594.36 


2,622.72 


2,622.72 


207.39 


207.39 


3,324.48 


3,324.48 


12.93 


12.93 


3,168.48 


3,168.48 


2,328.07 


2,328.07 


3,050.63 


3,050.63 


3,149.80 


3,149.80 


410.69 


410.69 


2,627.96 


2,627.96 


3,063.54 


3,063.54 


949.40 


949.40 


-349.85 


5,018.95 


-822.09 


4,546.71 


3,077.00 


3,077.00 


12.93 


12.93 


2,628.80 


2,628.80 


317.26 


317.26 


112.80 


112.80 


47.68 


47.68 


2,473.91 


2,473.91 


3,146.58 


3,146.58 


1,968.48 


1,968.48 


209.15 


209.15 



135 



POSITION 



Cafeter 


a 


Workers anc 


Substitutes 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Wo r ke r 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter" 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter' 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


V/orker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


Cafeter 


'a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


tute 


Cafeter 


'a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


'tute 


Cafeter 


'a 


Worker 


and 


Subst 


"tute 



REGULAR PAY OVERTIME PAY 



it'd) 



4,232.96 
4,232.96 



5,368.80 
6,114.00 

4,232.96 
5,274.90 



5,368.80 



OTHER 


GROSS PAY 


3,149.80 


3,149.80 


1,706.66 


1 ,706.66 


3,168.76 


3,168.76 


28.20 


28.20 


3,180.48 


3,180.48 


2,328.07 


2,328.07 


68.15 


68.15 


2,011.90 


2,011.90 


636.85 


636.85 


855.42 


855.42 


3,141.94 


3,141.94 


1,174.42 


1,174.42 


928.27 


928.27 


11.75 


11.75 


3,141.94 


3,141.94 


966.89 


5,199.85 


1,066.99 


5,299.95 


3,150.88 


3,150.88 


264.96 


264.96 


9.40 


9.40 


2,582.44 


2,582.44 


3,171.56 


3,171.56 


3,145.70 


3,145.70 


326.66 


326.66 


28.20 


28.20 


1,475.73 


1,475.73 


2,565.64 


2,565.64 


-282.77 


5,086.03 


3,400. 08 


3, 400. 08 


3,144.74 


3,177.74 


637.75 


6.751.75 


3,167.68 


3,167.68 


2,212.53 


2,212.53 


3,166.60 


3,166.60 


2,612.24 


2,612.24 


1,066.99 


5,299-95 


2,990.74 


2,990.74 


3,149.80 


3,149.80 


1,340.05 


6,614.95 


2,126.80 


2,126.80 


14.10 


14.10 


4,917.04 


4,917.04 


3,141.94 


3,141.94 


380.70 


380.70 


22.33 


22.33 


91.65 


91.65 


1,830.98 


1,830.98 


932.95 


932.95 


7.05 


7.05 


3,077.00 


3,077.00 


-349.45 


5,018.95 


42.30 


42.30 


271.43 


271.43 


3,414.98 


3,414.98 


79-90 


79.90 



136 



POSITION REGUALR PAY OVERTIME PAY OTHER GROSS PAY 

Cafeteria Workers and Substitutes (cont'd) 

Cafeteria Worker and Substitute 2,33^-39 2,33 / ».39 

Teacher Substitutes 
Teacher Substitutes 
Teacher Substitutes 



00.00 


1*00.00 


26.00 


26.00 


91.00 


91.00 



137 



POSITION 



NASHOBA VALLEY TECHNICAL HIGH SCHOOL 

REGULAR PAY OVERTIME OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



AUTOMOTIVE DEPT , 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 



CARPENTRY DEPT . 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

COMMERCIAL ART 
Teacher 
Teacher 
TOTAL 

COMM. SER. AID 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

DRAFTING DEPT . 
Teacher 
Teacher 
TOTAL 

ELECTRICAL DEPT . 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

ELECTRONICS DEPT . 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

GRAPHICS DEPT . 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

MACHINE SHOP 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 



15,848.82 
14,602.57 
15,417.69 
45,869.08 



13,215.30 
4,707.63 

15,453.82 

16,014.59 
7,658.41 

57,049.75 



10,053.82 
15,711.18 
25,765.00 



15,053.89 

14,877.52 

6,280.37 

36,211.78 



14,511.95 
16,336.81 
30,848.76 



14,090.69 
14,602.57 
16,892.22 
45,585.48 



4,361.49 

4,569.21 

10,989.55 

13,727-10 

33,647.35 



16,308.68 
16,625.76 
14,090.69 
47,025.13 



14,573.41 
15,734.00 
16,342.59 
46,650.00 

13 



11.54 



38.00 
W5t 



15,860.36 
14,602.57 
15,417.69 
45,880.62 



13,215.30 
4,707.63 

15,453.82 

16,014.59 
7,658.41 

57,049.75 



10.053.82 
15,749.18 
25,803.00 



15,053.89 

14,877.52 

6,280.37 

36,211.78 



14,511.95 
16,336.81 
30,848.76 



14,090.69 
14,602.57 
16,892.22 
45,585.48 



4,361.49 

4,569.21 

10,989.55 

13,727-10 

33,647.35 



16,308.68 
16,625.76 
14,090.69 
47,025.13 



14,573.41 
15,734.00 
16,342.59 
46,650.00 



POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME 


METAL FAB 






Teacher 


15,720.82 




Teacher 


16,303.99 




TOTAL 


32,02^.81 




CULINARY ARTS 






Teacher 


4, 707. 63 




Teacher 


7,681.55 




TOTAL 


12,389.18 




DATA PROCESSING 






Teacher 


16,21*8.99 




Teacher 


19,033.98 
4, 361. 49 




TOTAL 


39,644.46 




PAINTING S DECORATING 






Teacher 


4,015.35 




Teacher 


12,554.43 




TOTAL 


16,569.78 




PLUMBING & HEATING DEPT. 






Teacher 


14,090.69 




Teacher 


A, 009. 79 




Teacher 


8,359.32 




TOTAL 


26,459.80 




AUTOBODY DEPT. 






Teacher 


16,073.73 




Teacher 


15,114.37 




TOTAL 


31,188.10 




PHYS. ED. DEPT. 






Teacher 


10,484.28 




Teacher 


10,253.16 




Teacher 


16,059.27 




TOTAL 


36,796.71 




SPECIAL NEEDS DEPT. 






SUPERVISOR 


14,453.13 




AIDE 


133.00 




AIDE 


2,855.63 




SUBSTITUTE TEACHER 


1, 140.00 




AIDE 


2,889.13 




SUBSTITUTE SUPERVISOR 


442.00 




INSTRUCTOR 


11,011.26 




SOCIAL WORKER 


1,714.50 




TOTAL 


34,638.65 




COMMUNITY SERVICE 






Teacher Data Processing 


2,884. 57 




D.P. Keypunch Oper. 


502.51 





OTHER 



9.50 



25.50 
35.00 



1.76 



GROSS PAY 



15,720.82 
16,313.49 
32,034.31 



4,707.63 

7,707.05 

12,^14.68 



16,248.99 

19,033.98 

4,361.49 

39,644.46 



4,015.35 
12,554.43 
16,569.78 



14,090.69 
4,009.79 
8,359-32 

26,459.80 



16,073.73 
15,114-37 
31,188.10 



10,484.28 
10,253.16 
16,059.27 
36,796.71 



14,453.13 

133.00 

2,855.63 

1,140.00 

2,889.13 

442.00 

11 ,011.26 

1,714.50 

34,638.65 



2,884.57 
504.27 



139 



POSITION 


REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME 


COMMUNITY SERVICE (cont'd) 






D.P. Programmer 


8,109.37 




D.P. Keypunch Oper. 


1,471.50 




TOTAL 


12,967.95 




GUIDANCE DEPT. 






Di rector 


20,864.44 




Counselor 


11,439.98 




Counselor 


4,326.84 




Placement Counselor 


8,936.92 




Social Worker 


875.50 




Counselor 


14,751.01 




TOTAL 


61,194.69 




ACADEMIC DEPT. 






Teacher 


12,554.43 




Teacher 


6,280.37 




Teacher 


12,977.71 




Teacher 


10,801.51 




Teacher 


16,282.81 




Teacher 


9,949.58 




Teacher 


12,076.77 




Teacher 


15,655.96 




Teacher 


15,491.92 




Teacher 


3,323.07 




Teacher 


11,380.84 




Teacher 


9,949.75 




Teacher 


5,720.94 




Teacher 


13,369.72 




Teacher 


11,083.23 




Teacher 


12,419.87 




TOTAL 


179,318.48 




CAFETERIA 






SUB 


555.00 




Sub. 


157.50 




Worker 


2,324.67 




Worker 


2,572.72 




Sub. 


12.50 




Worker 


2,158.21 




Sub. 


456.57 




Worker 


3,670.46 




Worker 


3,568.62 




Manager 


9,499.88 




TOTAL 


24,976.13 




CUSTODIANS 






Custodian 


8,769.60 




Custodian 


7,486.40 




Custodian 


2,520.00 




Custod ian 


323.50 




Custodian 


8,674.00 




Custodian 


1,091.20 




Custod ian 


1,099.20 




Custodian 


7,972.00 





OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




8,109.37 




1,471.50 


1.76 


12,969.71 




20,864.44 




11,439.98 




4,326.84 




8,936.92 




875.50 




14,751.01 




61,194.69 




12,554.43 




6,280.37 




12,977.71 




10,801.51 




16,282.81 




9,949.58 




12,076.77 




15,655.96 




15,491.92 




3,323.07 




11,380.84 


38.00 


9,987.75 




5,720.94 




13,369.72 




11,083.23 




12,419.87 


38.00 


179,356.48 




555.00 




157.50 


7.74 


2,332.41 


9.27 


2,581.99 




12.50 


15.82 


2,174.03 




456.57 


6.24 


3,676.70 


8.64 


3,667.26 


35.00 


9,534.88 


82.71 


25,148.84 


1,363.87 


10,133.47 


216.00 


7,702.40 


311.12 


2,831.12 


85.92 


409.42 


852.58 


9,526.58 




1,091.20 




1,099.20 


336.50 


8,308.50 



140 



POSITION REGULAR PAY OVERTIME OTHER GROSS PAY 

CUSTODIANS (cont'd) 

Custodian 9,232.95 2,727.28 11,960.23 

Custodian 48.00 48.00 

Custodian 3,342.80 133.57 3,^76.37 

TOTAL 50,559.65 6,026.8** 56,586.49 

OFFICE SEC. 67,530.80 67,608.43 

ADMINISTRATORS 

Spec. Needs Coord. 2, 465.04 2,465.04 

Supt-Director 28,856.51 28,856.51 

Technical Coord. 12,163.34 28.04 12,191.38 

7,096.14 7,096.14 

Ass't to Supt. 23,849.02 23,849.02 

Academic Coord. 19,524.06 19,524.06 

TOTAL 93,954.11 28.04 93,982.15 

SUBSTITUTES 

Teacher 120.00 120.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 40.00 40.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 150.00 150.00 

Teacher 150.00 150.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 360.00 360.00 

Teacher 390.00 390.00 

Teacher 570.00 570.00 

Teacher 120.00 120.00 

Teacher 2,340.00 2,340.00 

Teacher 20.00 20.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 2, 280.00 2, 280.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 150.00 150.00 

Teacher 1,110.00 1,110.00 

Teacher 610.00 610.00 

Teacher 570.00 570.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 90.00 90.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 540.00 540.00 

Teacher 210.00 210.00 

Teacher 20.00 20.00 

Teacher 1,290.00 1,290.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 300.00 300.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 720.00 720.00 

Teacher 30.00 30.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

Teacher 60.00 60.00 

141 



POSITION 



REGULAR PAY 



OVERTIME 



OTHER 



GROSS PAY 



SUBSTITUTES (cont'd) 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

Teacher 

TOTAL 

NIGHT SCHOOL 

Teachers 

Clerical 

Tool Crib Boys 

TOTAL 



15.00 
240.00 

90.00 
930.00 
150.00 

30.00 
150.00 

30.00 
740.00 

90.00 
210.00 

30.00 

150.00 

210.00 

15,875.00 



31,800.71 
1,213.51 
2,720.51 

35773X73 



15.00 
240.00 

90.00 
930.00 
150.00 

30.00 
150.00 

30.00 
740.00 

90.00 
210.00 

30.00 

150.00 

210.00 

15,895.00 



31,800.71 
1,213.51 
2,720.51 

35,734.73 



DRIVERS 

Driver 

Driver 

Driver 

Driver 

Driver 

Driver 

Driver 

TOTAL 



3,5^0.60 

6.60 

5,355.68 

4,084.80 

475.^0 

542.00 

393.76 

14,398.84 



103.95 



307.15 



118.50 
411.10 



9.10 



3,711.91 

15.60 

6,214.99 

4,084.80 

475.^0 

542.00 

512.26 

15,556.98 



SCHOOL COMMITTEE 
Secretaries 
Secretaries 
TOTAL 



LIBRARY 



450.00 
382.50 
832.50 

8,650.84 



187.88 



450.00 
382.50 
832.50 

8,838.72 



SUMMER SCHOOL 

Teacher 

Teacher 



TOTAL 



855.00 
28.50 
855.00 
826.50 
855.00 
3,420.00 



855.00 
28.50 
855.00 
826.50 
855-00 
3,420.00 



SUMMER EXPLORATORY 



Teachers 


& 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 


Teachers 


6 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 


Teachers 


& 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 


Teachers 


& 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 


Teachers 


£ 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 


Teachers 


& 


tool 


Crib 


Boys 



456.00 
874.00 
874.00 
684.00 
96.00 
72.00 



456.00 
874.00 
874.00 
684.00 
96.00 
72.00 



142 





POSITION 




REGULAR PAY 


OVERTIME 


SUMMER EXPLORATORY (< 


:ont'd) 
Boys 


874.00 




Teachers 


& 


too 


1 Crib 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


1 Crib 


Boys 


190.00 




Teachers 


S 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


874.00 




Teachers 


& 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


418.00 




Teachers 


& 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


798.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


152.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


874.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


144.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


76.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


112.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


418.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


40.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


48.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


368.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


342.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


380.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


800.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


456.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


184.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


40.00 




Teachers 


£ 


too 


Crib 


Boys 


874.00 




TOTAL 










12,622.00 




DRIVER EDUCATIC 


)N 








Driver Educatic 


>n 








Driver Educatic 


>n 








TOTAL 














LIAISON 


INSTRUC 


:tors 








Liaison 


Instruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


instruc 


.tor 








Liai son 


Instruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


Instruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


nstruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


Instruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


nstruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


Instruc 


.tor 








Liaison 


nstruc 


.tor 








TOTAL 














LEAD INSTRUCTOF 


is 









Lead Instructor 

Lead Instructor 

Lead Instructor 

Lead Instructor 

Lead Instructor 

Lead Instructor 
TOTAL 



OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




874.00 




190.00 




184.00 




874.00 




184.00 




418.00 




798.00 




184.00 




152.00 




874.00 




144.00 




76.00 




184.00 




112.00 




418.00 




40.00 




184.00 




48.00 




368.00 




184.00 




342.00 




380.00 




800.00 




456.00 




184.00 




40.00 




874.00 




12,622.00 


594.00 


594.00 


571.00 


571.00 


1,165.00 


1,165.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


400.00 


3,600.00 


3,600.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


100.00 


600.00 


600.00 



143 



POSITION 

Detention Master 
Discipl ine Master 
TOTAL 

Senior Class Advisor 

Assistant 

Junior Class Advisor 

Assistant 

Sophmore Class Advisor 

Freshman Class Advisor 

Student Council Advisor 

School Newspaper Advisor 

TOTAL 

Music Instructor 
Athletic Director 
Head Football Coach 
Assistant Football 
Head Freshman Football 
Cross County 
Head Hockey 
Assistant Head Hockey 
J.V. Hockey 
Basketbal 1 
J.V. Basketball 
Freshman Basketball 
Girls Basketball 
Fencing 
Head Basebal 1 
Head Track 
Assistant Track 
Cheerleader Advisor 
TOTAL 

Nurse 



REGULAR PAY OVERTIME OTHER 


GROSS PAY 




500.00 


500.00 




400.00 


400.00 




900.00 


900.00 




4oo.oo 


400.00 




100.00 


100.00 




300.00 


300.00 




100.00 


100.00 




200.00 


200.00 




200.00 


200.00 




300.00 


300.00 




250.00 


250.00 




1,850.00 


1,850.00 




398.75 


398.75 




1,100.00 


1,100.00 




1,450.00 


1,450.00 




1,100.00 


1,100.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




800.00 


800.00 




1,100.00 


1,100.00 




650.00 


650.00 




600.00 


600.00 




1,200.00 


1,200.00 




900.00 


900.00 




800.00 


800.00 




600.00 


600.00 




550.00 


550.00 




1,000.00 


1,000.00 




900.00 


900.00 




650.00 


650.00 




500.00 


500.00 




14,490.00 


14,490.00 



8,501.53 



184.47 



8,686.00 



144 




ANNl 1* 




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Chelmsford 



INDEX 

Appointed Town Officials 3 

Board of Appeals 76 

Board of Assessors 72 

Board of Registrars 90 

Board of Selectmen 7 

CATV Advisory Committee 92 

Celebrations Committee 89 

Cemetery Commission 77 

Civil Defense Commission 69 

Conservation Commission 82 

Council on Aging 83 

Crystal Lake Restoration Committee 92 

Department of Veterans' Services 74 

Dog Officer 81 

DP. W. Study Committee 77 

Elected Town Officials 3 

Environmental Advisory Council 84 

Fire Department 69 

Fire Station Building Committee — East Chelmsford 70 

Flood Prevention Study Committee 87 

Gas Inspector 80 

General Information 2 

Health Department 71 

Highway Department 71 

Historical Commission 89 

Historic District Commission 90 

Home Rule Advisory Committee 84 

Housing Authority 87 

Insect Pest Control 82 

Inspector of Animals 81 

Insurance Sinking Fund Commission 92 

Jury List 9 

Northern Middlesex Area Commission 85 

Park Department 77 

Planning Board 74 

Plumbing Inspector 80 

Police Department 66 

Public Libraries 76 

Purchasing Agent 91 

Recreation Commission 78 

Revolutionary War Bicentennial Celebrations Commission 90 

School Committee 54 

Sealer of Weights & Measures 80 

Sewer Commission 88 

Town Accountant 93 

Town Aide 83 

Town Clerk 8 

Warrant for Presidential Primary March 2, 1976 12 

Results of Presidential Primary Election held on March 2, 1976 13 

Warrant for Town Election April 5, 1976, and Town Meeting May 3, 1976 16 

Results of Annual Town Election held on April 5, 1976 23 

Annual Town Meeting May 3, 1976, action taken on ARTICLES 2, & 2B, 

BUDGET ARTICLES 2A &3 25 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 10, 1976, BUDGET ARTICLES CON'T 

Also ARTICLES 4-32 30 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting of May 24, 1976 35 

Special Town Meeting May 24, 1976, action taken on special articles 1-10 37 

Adjourned Annual Town Meeting May 24, 1976, article 33-36 37 

Adjourned Annual Town Meetingjune 2, 1976, Article 37 39 

Adjourned Annual Town Meetingjune 8, 1976, Article 37-58 39 

Warrant for State Primary September 14, 1976 42 

Results of State Primary held on September 14, 1976 43 

Warrant for State Election November 2, 1976 46 

Results of State Election held on November 2, 1976 49 

Warrant for Special Town Meeting of December 1 , 1976 51 

Special Town Meeting December 1, 1976, action taken on 

Special Articles 1-8 52 

Town Planner 91 



Treasurer and Tax Collector 93 

Tree Department 82 

Veterans' Emergency Fund Committee 75 

Wire Inspector 80 

Youth Center Advisory Committee 78 



This report was prepared from individual inputs from all Town 
departments and committees and coordinated by the Board of Selectmen. 
The funds, $ 10,000 were appropriated at the 1976 Annual Town Meeting 
as line item 270. under Unclassified Departments. Each booklet cost 

$ . .